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Neurogenic inflammation

Shanta Islam, Md Shafiullah Shajib, Tajnin Ahmed
BACKGROUND: Celosia cristata Linn. (Amaranthaceae) is used in traditional medicine for the treatment of headache, sores, ulcers, eye inflammations, skin eruption, painful menstruation and carpal tunnel syndrome. This study was performed to evaluate the antinociceptive activity of methanol extract of the whole plant of C. cristata (MECC). METHODS: The evaluation of the antinociceptive effect of MECC was performed using thermal (hot plate, tail immersion test) and chemical (acetic acid, formalin, and glutamate-induced nociception test) pain models in mice at four different doses (50, 100, 200, 400 mg/kg; p...
October 22, 2016: BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Tilmann Ditting, Kristina Rodionova, Sonja Heinlein, Karl Friedrich Hilgers, Christian Ott, Roland Schmieder, Kerstin Amann, Roland Veelken
OBJECTIVE: Afferent renal nerves exhibit a dual function. They influence intrarenal immunological processes by release of neurokinins like CGRP and control central sympathetic outflow via afferent electrical activity. The former seems to be important in renal inflammation whereas the sympathetic modulation by afferent electrical activity is not fully understood in cardiovascular disease and hypertension. Hence, we hypothesized that augmented effects of CGRP in renal inflammation occur with increased afferent renal nerve activity...
September 2016: Journal of Hypertension
Paul Owusu Donkor, Ying Chen, Liqin Ding, Feng Qiu
ETHNOPHARMACOLOGICAL RELEVANCE: Ligusticum species (Umbelliferae) have been widely used in traditional Chinese medicine, Korean folk medicine and Native American medicine for their medicinal and nutritional value. Decoctions of the rhizomes are used in treatment and prophylaxis of migraine, anaemia and cardiovascular conditions including stroke. AIM OF STUDY: This review is intended to fully compile the constituents of locally and traditionally used Ligusticum species, present their bioactivities and highlight potential leads for future drug design, and thus, provide a reference for further research and application of these species...
October 8, 2016: Journal of Ethnopharmacology
Frances Corrigan, Kimberley A Mander, Anna V Leonard, Robert Vink
BACKGROUND: The neuroinflammatory response following traumatic brain injury (TBI) is known to be a key secondary injury factor that can drive ongoing neuronal injury. Despite this, treatments that have targeted aspects of the inflammatory pathway have not shown significant efficacy in clinical trials. MAIN BODY: We suggest that this may be because classical inflammation only represents part of the story, with activation of neurogenic inflammation potentially one of the key initiating inflammatory events following TBI...
October 11, 2016: Journal of Neuroinflammation
József Kun, Anikó Perkecz, Lorenz Knie, György Sétáló, Tamás Tornóczki, Erika Pintér, Ágnes Bán
OBJECTIVE: Oral lichen planus (OLP) is a chronic inflammatory disease of unknown etiology with antigen-specific and non-specific mechanisms. Transient Receptor Potential Ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) is a non-selective cation channel activated by noxious stimuli such as oxidative stress products evoking pain and release of proinflammatory mediators from sensory nerve endings culminating in neurogenic inflammation. Extraneuronal TRPA1s e.g. on immune cells possess yet unkown functions. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: We studied the buccal mRNA expression (qPCR) and protein localization (immunohistochemistry) of TRPA1 receptors, and key OLP mediator transcripts in oral mucosa samples of healthy volunteers (n=9), OLP patients (n=43) and OLP-like hyperkeratotic diseases (n=12)...
October 8, 2016: Oral Diseases
Xin Sun, Zachary B Jones, Xiao-Ming Chen, Libing Zhou, Kwok-Fai So, Yi Ren
Spinal cord injury (SCI) is a devastating event that results in significant physical disabilities for affected individuals. Apart from local injury within the spinal cord, SCI patients develop a variety of complications characterized by multiple organ dysfunction or failure. These disorders, such as neurogenic pain, depression, lung injury, cardiovascular disease, liver damage, kidney dysfunction, urinary tract infection, and increased susceptibility to pathogen infection, are common in injured patients, hinder functional recovery, and can even be life threatening...
October 6, 2016: Journal of Neuroinflammation
David Arsanious, Emmanuel Gage, Jonathon Koning, Mazin Sarhan, Gassan Chaiban, Mohammed Almualim, Joseph Atallah
BACKGROUND: One of the potential side effects with radiofrequency ablation (RFA) includes painful cutaneous dysesthesias and increased pain due to neuritis or neurogenic inflammation. This pain may require the prescription of opioids or non-opioid analgesics to control post-procedural pain and discomfort. OBJECTIVES: The goal of this study is to compare post-procedural pain scores and post-procedural oral analgesic use in patients receiving continuous thermal radiofrequency ablation versus patients receiving pulsed dose radiofrequency immediately followed by continuous thermal radiofrequency ablation for zygopophaseal joint disease...
September 2016: Pain Physician
Rita Dorantes-Heredia, José Manuel Ruiz-Morales, Fernando Cano-García
Lung cancer is the principal cause of cancer-related death worldwide. The use of targeted therapies, especially tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs), in specific groups of patients has dramatically improved the prognosis of this disease, although inevitably some patients will develop resistance to these drugs during active treatment. The most common cancer-associated acquired mutation is the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) Thr790Met (T790M) mutation. During active treatment with targeted therapies, histopathological transformation to small-cell lung carcinoma (SCLC) can occur in 3-15% of patients with non-small-cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) tumors...
August 2016: Translational Lung Cancer Research
Össur Ingi Emilsson, Bryndís Benediktsdóttir, Ísleifur Ólafsson, Elizabeth Cook, Sigurður Júlíusson, Einar Stefán Björnsson, Sunna Guðlaugsdóttir, Anna Soffía Guðmundsdóttir, Ekaterina Mirgorodskaya, Evert Ljungström, Erna Sif Arnardóttir, Þórarinn Gíslason, Christer Janson, Anna-Carin Olin
BACKGROUND: Nocturnal gastroesophageal reflux (nGER) is associated with respiratory symptoms and sleep-disordered breathing (SDB), but the pathogenesis is unclear. We aimed to investigate the association between nGER and respiratory symptoms, exacerbations of respiratory symptoms, SDB and airway inflammation. METHODS: Participants in the European Community Respiratory Health Survey III in Iceland with nGER symptoms (n = 48) and age and gender matched controls (n = 42) were studied by questionnaires, exhaled breath condensate (EBC), particles in exhaled air (PEx) measurements, and a home polygraphic study...
2016: Respiratory Research
Tilmann Ditting, Kristina Rodionova, Sonja Heinlein, Karl Friedrich Hilgers, Christian Ott, Roland Schmieder, Kerstin Amann, Roland Veelken
OBJECTIVE: Afferent renal nerves exhibit a dual function. They influence intrarenal immunological processes by release of neurokinins like CGRP and control central sympathetic outflow via afferent electrical activity. The former seems to be important in renal inflammation whereas the sympathetic modulation by afferent electrical activity is not fully understood in cardiovascular disease and hypertension. Hence, we hypothesized that augmented effects of CGRP in renal inflammation occur with increased afferent renal nerve activity...
September 2016: Journal of Hypertension
Alina Buture, Rubesh Gooriah, Randa Nimeri, Fayyaz Ahmed
CONTEXT: Migraine and cluster headache are undoubtedly painful conditions. The respective pathogenesis of these two conditions is incompletely understood. In both cases, the treatments used have largely been empirical and have relied to a much lesser extent on our understanding of the mechanisms causing pain. We hereby review the pain mechanisms in migraine and cluster headache, two of the commonest primary headache disorders. EVIDENCE ACQUISITION: A review of the English literature was conducted by searching PubMed for studies on pain mechanism in migraine and cluster headache...
June 2016: Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine
Siegfried Mense, Ulrich Hoheisel
Recently, the existence of nociceptive fibers in fascia tissue has attracted much interest. Fascia can be a source of pain in several disorders such as fasciitis and non-specific low back pain. However, little is known about the properties of fascia nociceptors and possible changes of the fascia innervation by nociceptors under pathological circumstances. In this histologic study, the density of presumably nociceptive fibers and free nerve endings was determined in the three layers of the rat TLF: inner layer (IL, covering the multifidus muscle), middle layer (ML) and outer layer (OL)...
July 2016: Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
Reza Bahador, Ahmadreza Mirbolook, Sara Arbab, Pooya Derakhshan, Amirmohammad Gholizadeh, Sadegh Abedi
BACKGROUND: Reflex sympathetic dystrophy (RSD) syndrome is a multifactorial disorder with clinical features of neurogenic inflammation that causes hypersensitivity to pain or severe allodynia as well as blood flow problems, swelling, skin discoloration and maladaptive neuroplasticity due to vasomotor disorders. Patients with major trauma are prone to homeostasis leading to inflammatory response syndrome and multiple organ distress syndrome. Several studies have investigated the etiology of this condition, but the cause remains unknown...
May 2016: Trauma Monthly
K N Dodds, E A H Beckett, S F Evans, P M Grace, L R Watkins, M R Hutchinson
In the central nervous system, bidirectional signaling between glial cells and neurons ('neuroimmune communication') facilitates the development of persistent pain. Spinal glia can contribute to heightened pain states by a prolonged release of neurokine signals that sensitize adjacent centrally projecting neurons. Although many persistent pain conditions are disproportionately common in females, whether specific neuroimmune mechanisms lead to this increased susceptibility remains unclear. This review summarizes the major known contributions of glia and neuroimmune interactions in pain, which has been determined principally in male rodents and in the context of somatic pain conditions...
2016: Translational Psychiatry
Fuben Xu, Huayu Wu, Kun Zhang, Peizhen Lv, Li Zheng, Jinmin Zhao
Nerve regeneration remains a challenge to the treatment of peripheral nerve injury. Andrographolide (Andro) is the main active constituent of Andrographis paniculata, which has been applied in the treatment of several diseases, including inflammation, in ancient China. Andro has been reported to facilitate the reduction of edema and to exert analgesic effects in the treatment of various diseases. These findings suggest that Andro may be considered a promising anti‑inflammatory agent that may suppress destruction and accelerate proliferation of Schwann cells following peripheral nerve injury...
October 2016: Molecular Medicine Reports
Shifeng Wang, Chenxi Zhai, Yanling Zhang, Yangyang Yu, Yuxin Zhang, Lianghui Ma, Shiyou Li, Yanjiang Qiao
The increasing demand for safe and effective treatments of chronic pain has promoted the investigation of novel analgesic drugs. Some herbals have been known to be able to relieve pain, while the chemical basis and target involved in this process remained to be clarified. The current study aimed to find anti-nociceptive candidates targeting transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 (TRPA1), a receptor that implicates in hyperalgesia and neurogenic inflammation. In the current study, 156 chemicals were tested for blocking HEK293/TRPA1 ion channel by calcium-influx assay...
2016: Molecules: a Journal of Synthetic Chemistry and Natural Product Chemistry
Benjamin M Manning, Sarah M Gruba, Audrey F Meyer, Christy L Haynes
As tissue-resident immune cells, mast cells are frequently found in close proximity to afferent neurons and are subjected to immunoactive mediators secreted by these neurons, including substance P (SP) and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP). Neurogenic inflammation is thought to play an important role in the pathophysiology of many diseases. Unraveling the cellular mechanisms at the interface between the immune response and the peripheral nervous system is important for understanding how these diseases arise and progress...
August 31, 2016: ACS Chemical Biology
Jacek C Szepietowski, Adam Reich
Psoriasis is a common chronic inflammatory skin disease observed in about 1-3% of the general population. About 60-90% of patients with psoriasis suffer from itching. Interestingly, in the past itch was not considered as an important symptom of psoriasis. Despite the high frequency of itch in psoriasis, the pathogenesis of this symptom is still not fully elucidated. Although most studies indicate neurogenic inflammation and the role of neuropeptides, other mediators may be important as well. The majority of psoriatic patients consider itch as the most bothersome symptom of the disease as it significantly alters daily functioning and psychosocial well-being...
2016: Current Problems in Dermatology
Eugene Krustev, Milind M Muley, Jason J McDougall
Neurogenic inflammation is a local inflammatory response that is driven by the peripheral release of neuropeptides from small diameter afferents which occurs in many organs including joints. The knee joint has a rich endocannabinoid system which has been shown to decrease acute synovitis. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of joint afferents on leukocyte-endothelial interactions within the synovial microcirculation of mice and determine the role of endocannabinoids on this inflammatory response...
August 22, 2016: Neuropeptides
HyeonJu Kim, Ying Wei, Ji Yong Lee, Yue Wu, Yi Zheng, Michael A Moskowitz, John W Chen
The relationship between inflammation and neurogenesis in stroke is currently not well understood. Focal ischemia enhances cell proliferation and neurogenesis in the neurogenic regions, including the subventricular zone (SVZ), dentate gyrus, as well as the non-neurogenic striatum, and cortex in the ischemic hemisphere. Myeloperoxidase (MPO) is a potent oxidizing enzyme secreted during inflammation by activated leukocytes, and its enzymatic activity is highly elevated after stroke. In this study, we investigated whether the inhibition of MPO activity by a specific irreversible inhibitor, 4-aminobenzoic acid hydrazide (ABAH) (MPO(-/-) mice) can increase neurogenesis after transient middle cerebral artery occlusion in mice...
November 2016: Journal of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics
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