Read by QxMD icon Read

Neurogenic inflammation

Marc G J Feuilloley
By its size and diversity, the cutaneous microbial flora is the second of the human body and there is a growing body of research showing its key role in cutaneous homeostasis. However, skin is also the first neuroendocrine organ and it is now demonstrated that bacteria can sense a multitude of human hormones and neurotransmitters. Then, besides of the intrinsic effect of their virulence factors on cutaneous neurogenic activity, recent data demonstrate that the virulence, invasion potential, and biofilm formation activity of some of the principal species of the cutaneous bacteria flora are directly controlled by neuropeptides released by sensory nerve endings including substance P and calcitonin gene-related peptide...
March 16, 2018: Seminars in Immunopathology
Marion Griton, Jan Pieter Konsman
Although the immune and nervous systems have long been considered independent biological systems, they turn out to mingle and interact extensively. The present review summarizes recent insights into the neural pathways activated by and involved in infection-induced inflammation and discusses potential clinical applications. The simplest activation concerns a reflex action within C-fibers leading to neurogenic inflammation. Low concentrations of pro-inflammatory cytokines or bacterial fragments may also act on these afferent nerve fibers to signal the central nervous system and bring about early fever, hyperalgesia and sickness behavior...
March 14, 2018: Clinical Autonomic Research: Official Journal of the Clinical Autonomic Research Society
Satyanarayana Achanta, Narendranath Reddy Chintagari, Marian Brackmann, Shrilatha Balakrishna, Sven-Eric Jordt
The skin is highly sensitive to the chemical warfare agent in mustard gas, sulfur mustard (SM) that initiates a delayed injury response characterized by erythema, inflammation and severe vesication (blistering). Although SM poses a continuing threat, used as recently as in the Syrian conflict, no mechanism-based antidotes against SM are available. Recent studies demonstrated that Transient Receptor Potential Ankyrin 1 (TRPA1), a chemosensory cation channel in sensory nerves innervating the skin, is activated by SM and 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide (CEES), an SM analog, in vitro, suggesting it may promote vesicant injury...
March 10, 2018: Toxicology Letters
João Cavaleiro Rufo, Inês Paciência, Diana Silva, Carla Martins, Joana Madureira, Eduardo de Oliveira Fernandes, Patrícia Padrão, Pedro Moreira, Luís Delgado, André Moreira
BACKGROUND: Endurance swimming exercises coupled to disinfection by-products exposure has been associated with increased airways dysfunction and neurogenic inflammation in elite swimmers. However, the impact of swimming pool exposure at a recreational level on autonomic activity has never been explored. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate how swimming pool attendance is influencing lung and autonomic function in school-aged children. METHODS: A total of 858 children enrolled a cross sectional survey...
2018: PloS One
Dora Reglodi, Alexandra Vaczy, Eloísa Rubio-Beltran, Antoinette MaassenVanDenBrink
Pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide (PACAP) is an ubiquitous peptide involved, among others, in neurodevelopment, neuromodulation, neuroprotection, neurogenic inflammation and nociception. Presence of PACAP and its specific receptor, PAC1, in the trigeminocervical complex, changes of PACAP levels in migraine patients and the migraine-inducing effect of PACAP injection strongly support the involvement of PACAP/PAC1 receptor in migraine pathogenesis. While antagonizing PAC1 receptor is a promising therapeutic target in migraine, the diverse array of PACAP's functions, including protection in ischemic events, requires that the cost-benefit of such an intervention is well investigated by taking all the beneficial effects of PACAP into account...
March 2, 2018: Journal of Headache and Pain
Cláudia Saraiva, Daniela Talhada, Akhilesh Rai, Raquel Ferreira, Lino Ferreira, Liliana Bernardino, Karsten Ruscher
There is a high quest for novel therapeutic strategies to enhance recovery after stroke. MicroRNA-124 (miR-124) has been described as neuroprotective and anti-inflammatory molecule. Moreover, miR-124 is a well described enhancer of adult neurogenesis that could offer potentially beneficial effects. Herein, we used miR-124-loaded nanoparticles (miR-124 NPs) to evaluate their therapeutic potential in an in vitro and in vivo model of stroke. For that, neuroprotective and neurogenic responses were assessed in an in vitro model of stroke...
2018: PloS One
Emine Elif Altuntaş, Ömer Tamer Doğan, Bülent Saraç, Nergiz Hacer Turgut, Kasım Durmuş, Melih Akyol
Neurogenic inflammation plays a role in the pathophysiology of allergic rhinitis. Highly effective in reducing the sensory irritation caused by some substances, strontium salts directly affect C-type nerve fibers. The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy of mometasone furoate and strontium chloride on early-phase symptoms in a rat model of allergic rhinitis. Wistar albino rats (n = 24) were randomly divided into three groups: the mometasone group, receiving 1 μg mometasone furoate (2 µl/site); the strontium 3% group, receiving 3% strontium chloride (2 μl/site); and the strontium 5% group, receiving 5% strontium chloride (2 μl/site)...
January 2018: Ear, Nose, & Throat Journal
Francesca L'Episcopo, Cataldo Tirolo, Maria F Serapide, Salvatore Caniglia, Nunzio Testa, Loredana Leggio, Silvia Vivarelli, Nunzio Iraci, Stefano Pluchino, Bianca Marchetti
Neuroinflammatory processes are recognized key contributory factors in Parkinson's disease (PD) physiopathology. While the causes responsible for the progressive loss of midbrain dopaminergic (mDA) neuronal cell bodies in the subtantia nigra pars compacta are poorly understood, aging, genetics, environmental toxicity, and particularly inflammation, represent prominent etiological factors in PD development. Especially, reactive astrocytes, microglial cells, and infiltrating monocyte-derived macrophages play dual beneficial/harmful effects, via a panel of pro- or anti-inflammatory cytokines, chemokines, neurotrophic and neurogenic transcription factors...
2018: Frontiers in Aging Neuroscience
Eva Pigna, Alessandra Renzini, Emanuela Greco, Elena Simonazzi, Stefania Fulle, Rosa Mancinelli, Viviana Moresi, Sergio Adamo
BACKGROUND: Denervation triggers numerous molecular responses in skeletal muscle, including the activation of catabolic pathways and oxidative stress, leading to progressive muscle atrophy. Histone deacetylase 4 (HDAC4) mediates skeletal muscle response to denervation, suggesting the use of HDAC inhibitors as a therapeutic approach to neurogenic muscle atrophy. However, the effects of HDAC4 inhibition in skeletal muscle in response to long-term denervation have not been described yet...
February 24, 2018: Skeletal Muscle
Mohammad Khalil, Korina Alliger, Carl Weidinger, Cansu Yerinde, Stefan Wirtz, Christoph Becker, Matthias Agop Engel
Transient receptor potential (TRP) ion channels are widely expressed in several tissues throughout the mammalian organism. Originally, TRP channel physiology was focusing on its fundamental meaning in sensory neuronal function. Today, it is known that activation of several TRP ion channels in peptidergic neurons does not only result in neuropeptide release and consecutive neurogenic inflammation. Growing evidence demonstrates functional extra-neuronal TRP channel expression in immune and epithelial cells with important implications for mucosal immunology...
2018: Frontiers in Immunology
Wenbin Yang, Timothy J Searl, Ryan E Yaggie, Anthony J Schaeffer, David J Klumpp
Interstitial cystitis/ bladder pain syndrome (IC/BPS) is a chronic bladder condition associated with pain and voiding dysfunction that is often regarded as a neurogenic cystitis. Patient symptoms are correlated with the presence of urothelial lesions. We previously characterized a murine neurogenic cystitis model that recapitulates mast cell accumulation and urothelial lesions, and these events were dependent upon TNF. To further explore the role of TNF in bladder inflammation and function, we generated a transgenic mouse model with chronic TNF overexpression in urothelium under the control of the uroplakin II (UPII) promoter...
February 21, 2018: American Journal of Physiology. Renal Physiology
M Kodali, B Hattiangady, G A Shetty, A Bates, B Shuai, A K Shetty
Diminished cognitive and mood function are among the most conspicuous symptoms of Gulf War Illness (GWI). Our previous studies in a rat model of GWI have demonstrated that persistent cognitive and mood impairments are associated with substantially declined neurogenesis, chronic low-grade inflammation, increased oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction in the hippocampus. We tested the efficacy of curcumin (CUR) to maintain better cognitive and mood function in a rat model of GWI because of its neurogenic, antiinflammatory, antioxidant, and memory and mood enhancing properties...
March 2018: Brain, Behavior, and Immunity
Michael S Hester, Natalia Tulina, Amy Brown, Guillermo Barila, Michal A Elovitz
Prenatal inflammation is associated with poor neurobehavioral outcomes in exposed offspring. A common route of exposure for the fetus is intrauterine infection, which is often associated with preterm birth. Hippocampal development may be particularly vulnerable to an inflammatory insult during pregnancy as this region remains highly neurogenic both prenatally and postnatally. These studies sought to determine if intrauterine inflammation specifically altered hippocampal neurogenesis and migration of newly produced granule neurons during the early postnatal period...
February 12, 2018: Brain Research
Kalpna Gupta, Ilkka T Harvima
Mast cells are best recognized for their role in allergy and anaphylaxis, but increasing evidence supports their role in neurogenic inflammation leading to pain and itch. Mast cells act as a "power house" by releasing algogenic and pruritogenic mediators, which initiate a reciprocal communication with specific nociceptors on sensory nerve fibers. Consequently, nerve fibers release inflammatory and vasoactive neuropeptides, which in turn activate mast cells in a feedback mechanism, thus promoting a vicious cycle of mast cell and nociceptor activation leading to neurogenic inflammation and pain/pruritus...
March 2018: Immunological Reviews
Martin Steinhoff, Jörg Buddenkotte, Ethan A Lerner
To protect our body systems, there is a constant interactive conversation between the skin nervous and immune system. Important elements of this conversation in the skin include mast cells, basophils, and sensory nerve fibers. These cells employ a vast array of sensors that detect danger and react accordingly. This reaction, summarized as neurogenic inflammation, manifests at the conscious level as sensations including pain and itch. Here we provide a perspective on the blossoming knowledge that is illuminating connections between mast cells, basophils, and sensory nerve fibers in the mediation of itch...
March 2018: Immunological Reviews
Linda S Sorkin, Kelly A Eddinger, Sarah A Woller, Tony L Yaksh
Neurogenic inflammation results from the release of biologically active agents from the peripheral primary afferent terminal. This release reflects the presence of releasable pools of active product and depolarization-exocytotic coupling mechanisms in the distal afferent terminal and serves to alter the physiologic function of innervated organ systems ranging from the skin and meninges to muscle, bone, and viscera. Aside from direct stimulation, this biologically important release from the peripheral afferent terminal can be initiated by antidromic activity arising from five anatomically distinct points of origin: (i) afferent collaterals at the peripheral-target organ level, (ii) afferent collaterals arising proximal to the target organ, (iii) from mid-axon where afferents lacking myelin sheaths (C fibers and others following demyelinating injuries) may display crosstalk and respond to local irritation, (iv) the dorsal root ganglion itself, and (v) the central terminals of the afferent in the dorsal horn where local circuits and bulbospinal projections can initiate the so-called dorsal root reflexes, i...
February 8, 2018: Seminars in Immunopathology
Yuanyuan Li, Tiantian Qu, Lijun Tian, Tingting Han, Yongjun Jin, Yuesi Wang
Neurogenic locus notch homolog protein (Notch) signaling mediates intracellular communication and may regulate cell fate decisions, including cell proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) possess immunomodulatory properties and the potential for use in stem cell replacement treatments. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the therapeutic effects of human placenta‑deviated MSCs (hPMSCs) in asthma and to investigate the mechanisms of Notch signaling mediated by transplanted MSCs...
January 19, 2018: Molecular Medicine Reports
Farah Chamaa, Lynn Bitar, Batoul Darwish, Nayef E Saade, Wassim Abou-Kheir
Physio-pathological conditions such as neuroinflammation can modulate neurogenesis in the hippocampus. The aim of this study is to follow the time course of inflammation-induced effects on the neurogenic niche and the counter-effects of an anti-inflammatory drug. Rats received intracerebroventricular injections of lipopolysaccharide/endotoxin (ET) and intraperitoneal injections of 5'-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine, then perfused at different time intervals. At day 3, ET injection resulted in thermal hyperalgesia accompanied by a significant decrease in neurogenesis...
February 15, 2018: Journal of Neuroimmunology
Li Zhang, Tieying Sun, Longteng Liu, Lifang Wang
Unexplained chronic cough (UCC) affects millions of patients worldwide. New therapeutic approaches to this condition are urgently needed, since current treatment options provide only symptomatic relief. Cough reflex hypersensitivity has been shown to play an important role in the pathogenesis of UCC. The transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) is present on peripheral terminals of airway sensory nerves and modulation of its activity represents a potential target for the pharmacological treatment of UCC...
December 27, 2017: Pulmonary Pharmacology & Therapeutics
Alireza Heidari, Mehdi Shahrabi, Marzieh Salehi Shahrabi, Mehdi Ghandehari, Pegah Rahbar
Objectives: Pulpal inflammation is often associated with odontogenic pain. Dental pulp is abundantly innervated with sensory fibers encompassing neuropeptides. Neurokinin A (NKA) and substance P (SP) are important neuropeptides in the dental pulp that can cause neurogenic inflammation. Since no previous study has assessed dental pulp neuropeptides in children, this study aimed to compare the level of NKA and SP in gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) of sound and symptomatic carious primary teeth...
July 2017: Journal of Dentistry of Tehran University of Medical Sciences
Fetch more papers »
Fetching more papers... Fetching...
Read by QxMD. Sign in or create an account to discover new knowledge that matter to you.
Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"