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direct oral anticoagulants guidelines

Matthew Gaskins, Martin Dittmann, Lisa Eisert, Ricardo Niklas Werner, Corinna Dressler, Christoph Löser, Alexander Nast
BACKGROUND: A survey in 2012 revealed marked heterogeneity in the management of antithrombotic agents in dermatologic surgery in Germany. An evidence-based guideline on this topic was published for the first time in 2014. METHODS: Using the same study sample, we conducted an anonymous survey on the management of antithrombotic agents and familiarity with the guideline. We reported the results as relative frequencies and compared them with those from 2012. RESULTS: We analyzed a total of 208 questionnaires (response rate: 36...
March 2018: Journal der Deutschen Dermatologischen Gesellschaft, Journal of the German Society of Dermatology: JDDG
Anne-Céline Martin, Sarah Lessire, Isabelle Leblanc, Anne-Sophie Dincq, Ivan Philip, Isabelle Gouin-Thibault, Anne Godier
BACKGROUND: Guidelines recommend to perform atrial fibrillation (AF) catheter ablation without interruption of direct oral anticoagulant (DOAC) and to administer unfractionated heparin (UFH) for an activated clotting time (ACT) ≥300 seconds, by analogy with vitamin K antagonist (VKA). Nevertheless, pharmacological differences between DOAC and VKA, especially regarding ACT sensitivity and UFH response, prevent extrapolation from VKA to DOAC. HYPOTHESIS: The level of anticoagulation at the time of the procedure in uninterrupted DOAC-treated patients is unpredictable, and would complicate intra-procedural UFH administration and monitoring...
March 13, 2018: Clinical Cardiology
Kiyoshi Azakami
Patients who undergo percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) placement are often on antiplatelet therapy. There is a potential risk of infarction if these medications are discontinued.The guidelines of the Japan Gastroenterological Endoscopy Society, classify PEG as an operation associated with a high risk of bleeding; however, it is known that surgery can be performed without interruption when patients are treated with low-dose aspirin alone. Nevertheless, we experienced the case of severe bleeding at the incision site, which was accompanied by massive hematemesis and hemorrhagic shock the night after PEG using the modified introducer method in an 87-year-old male patient...
2018: Nihon Ronen Igakkai Zasshi. Japanese Journal of Geriatrics
Michael Jolly, John Phillips
Pulmonary embolism remains a leading cause of death in the United States, with an estimated 180,000 deaths per year. Guideline-based treatment in most cases recommends oral anticoagulation for 3 months. However, in a small subset of patients, the "submassive, high-risk" by current nomenclature, with hemodynamic instability, more advanced therapeutic options are available. Treatment modalities to extract the thromboembolism and reduce pressure overload in the cardiopulmonary system include use of intravenous or catheter-directed thrombolytic agents, catheter-directed mechanical thrombectomy, and surgical embolectomy...
April 2018: Surgical Clinics of North America
Y Hassona, D Malamos, M Shaqman, Z Baqain, C Scully
Direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) are increasingly used as alternatives to warfarin because of the superior pharmacokinetic properties. Clinical guidelines on the influences of DOACs for dental procedures have emerged, but all of necessity based on low-quality available evidence. Herein, we share our experience with a case series, and propose a protocol regarding the management of dental patients taking DOACs.
March 2018: Oral Diseases
Charles Marc Samama, Dan Benhamou, Frédéric Aubrun, Jean-Luc Bosson, Pierre Albaladejo
BACKGROUND: Venous thromboembolism (VTE) prophylaxis is not always part of the usual care of ambulatory surgery patients, and few guidelines are available. OBJECTIVES: To collect data on the application of VTE prophylaxis in ambulatory patients. DESIGN: The OPERA study is a large national survey performed in 221 healthcare facilities. PATIENTS: 2174 patients who underwent one of ten selected procedures over two pre-defined days of investigation...
February 15, 2018: Anaesthesia, Critical Care & Pain Medicine
Yvonne M C Henskens, Anouk J W Gulpen, René van Oerle, Rick Wetzels, Paul Verhezen, Henri Spronk, Simon Schalla, Harry J Crijns, Hugo Ten Cate, Arina Ten Cate-Hoek
Background: Traditional coagulation tests are included in emergency guidelines for management of patients on direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) who experience acute bleeding or require surgery. We determined the ability of traditional coagulation tests and fast whole blood thromboelastography (ROTEM®) to screen for anticoagulation activity of dabigatran and rivaroxaban as low as 30 ng/mL. Methods: One hundred eighty-four citrated blood samples (75 dabigatran, 109 rivaroxaban) were collected from patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF), to perform screening tests from different manufacturers, (diluted, D) PT, aPTT, TT and ROTEM®...
2018: Thrombosis Journal
Mauro Chiarito, Davide Cao, Francesco Cannata, Cosmo Godino, Corrado Lodigiani, Giuseppe Ferrante, Renato D Lopes, John H Alexander, Bernhard Reimers, Gianluigi Condorelli, Giulio G Stefanini
Importance: Patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS) remain at high risk for experiencing recurrent ischemic events. Direct oral anticoagulants (DOAC) have been proposed for secondary prevention after ACS. Objective: To evaluate the safety and efficacy of DOAC in addition to antiplatelet therapy (APT) after ACS, focusing on treatment effects stratified by baseline clinical presentation (non-ST-segment elevation ACS [NSTE-ACS] vs ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction [STEMI])...
February 7, 2018: JAMA Cardiology
Eugenia Rota, Gianluca Bruzzone, Sergio Agosti, Roberto Pastorino, Nicola Morelli
RATIONALE: To date, the only treatment approved for acute ischemic strokes is thrombolysis. Whether intravenous thrombolysis may be safe in patients taking direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) is currently a matter of debate. PATIENT CONCERNS: A 74-year-old woman, who was on rivaroxaban 20 mg/d for nonvalvular atrial fibrillation, was admitted to our stroke unit with left-sided hemiparesis and aphasia. The onset of neurologic deficits had occurred 5 hours after the last rivaroxaban dose...
December 2017: Medicine (Baltimore)
Finlay A McAlister, Scott Garrison, Leanne Kosowan, Justin A Ezekowitz, Alexander Singer
BACKGROUND: As questions have been raised about the appropriateness of direct oral anticoagulant (DOAC) dosing among outpatients with atrial fibrillation, we examined this issue in patients being managed by primary care providers. METHODS AND RESULTS: This was a retrospective cohort new-user study using electronic medical records from 744 Canadian primary care clinicians. Potentially inappropriate DOAC prescribing was defined as prescribing lower or higher doses than those recommended by guidelines for patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation...
January 26, 2018: Journal of the American Heart Association
Jessica E Burjorjee, Rachel Rooney, Melanie Jaeger
OBJECTIVE: In this case report, we describe a case of epidural hematoma following epidural analgesia in a patient with recent cessation of a direct oral anticoagulant (DOAC). CASE REPORT: An 89-year-old woman requiring upper abdominal surgery presented with multiple comorbidities, including a prior cerebrovascular accident resulting in a left-sided hemiparesis and atrial fibrillation requiring anticoagulation with rivaroxaban. In accordance with our departmental guidelines at the time of procedure, rivaroxaban was discontinued 4 days preoperatively...
January 24, 2018: Regional Anesthesia and Pain Medicine
Seiji Madoiwa
The clinical relevance of the association between venous thromboembolism(VTE)and cancer is well documented. VTE is one of the leading causes of death in cancer patients. It would be an advantage to have knowledge on predictive parameters for the development of thrombosis and to be able to select cancer patients individually according to their riskprofiles. An elevated platelet count is associated with an increased riskof VTE in cancer patients. The biomarkers including D-dimer have been identified and used to extend the existing riskstratification...
December 2017: Gan to Kagaku Ryoho. Cancer & Chemotherapy
Minna Voigtlaender, Florian Langer
In patients with solid tumours or haematological malignancies, venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a leading cause of death and significantly contributes to morbidity and healthcare resource utilization. Current practice guidelines recommend long-term anticoagulation with low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH) as the treatment of choice for cancer-associated VTE, based on clinical trial data showing an overall improved safety and efficacy profile of LMWH compared to vitamin K antagonists. However, several open questions remain, e...
February 2018: VASA. Zeitschrift Für Gefässkrankheiten
Roopinder K Sandhu, Lisa M Guirguis, Tammy J Bungard, Erik Youngson, Lisa Dolovich, Jamie C Brehaut, Jeff S Healey, Finlay A McAlister
Background: Oral anticoagulant therapy (OAC) to prevent atrial fibrillation (AF)-related strokes remains poorly used. Alternate strategies, such as community pharmacist prescribing of OAC, should be explored. Methods: Approximately 400 pharmacists, half with additional prescribing authority (APA), randomly selected from the Alberta College of Pharmacists, were invited to participate in an online survey over a 6-week period. The survey consisted of demographics, case scenarios assessing appropriateness of OAC (based on the 2014 Canadian Cardiovascular Society AF guidelines) and perceived barriers to prescribing...
January 2018: Canadian Pharmacists Journal: CPJ, Revue des Pharmaciens du Canada: RPC
Taylor Steuber
Appropriate treatment of venous thromboembolism (VTE) is critical to minimizing long-term morbidity and mortality. The emergence of direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) has provided clinicians with expanded therapeutic options for patients with VTE, and as a result, updated practice guidelines released by the American College of Chest Physicians favor DOACs over traditional anticoagulants, such as warfarin. The newest DOAC, betrixaban, received FDA approval in 2017, with an indication for VTE prophylaxis in hospitalized adults...
December 2017: American Journal of Managed Care
A Williams, A Biffen, N Pilkington, L Arrick, R J Williams, M E Smith, M Smith, J Birchall
BACKGROUND: The management of epistaxis requires an understanding of haematological factors that may complicate its treatment. This systematic review includes six distinct reviews examining the evidence supporting epistaxis-specific management strategies relating to warfarin, direct oral anticoagulants, heparin, antiplatelet agents, tranexamic acid and transfusion. METHOD: A systematic review of the literature was performed using a standardised methodology and search strategy...
December 2017: Journal of Laryngology and Otology
William F McIntyre, Jeff Healey
Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common serious heart rhythm disorder, with a lifetime incidence of 1 in 4 for patients >40 years of age[1]. AF is a major cause of death and disability, as it is associated with a 4-5 fold increase in the risk of ischemic stroke[2]. In patients with AF, oral anticoagulation (OAC) therapy can reduce the risk of stroke by about two-thirds and the risk of all-cause mortality by approximately one-quarter, but is associated with an increased risk of bleeding[3], [4]. Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common serious heart rhythm disorder and is associated with an increased risk of ischemic stroke...
April 2017: Journal of Atrial Fibrillation
Devada Singh-Franco, Genevieve Hale, Robin J Jacobs
OBJECTIVES: Availability of direct oral anticoagulants and CHA2 DS2 VASc/HAS-BLED scoring tools underscore the importance of appropriate and safe use of oral anticoagulation therapy (OACT). The purpose of this study was to evaluate stroke prevention pharmacotherapy in adult patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF) discharged from a large, community-based hospital. METHODS: A retrospective cohort study was conducted using a de-identified data collection sheet for data extraction (demographics, admitting diagnosis, OACT prior to admission and at discharge, concomitant medications that could increase bleed risk and/or acid-suppressive therapies)...
February 2018: Hospital Practice (Minneapolis)
I Benzidia, J Connault, A Solanilla, U Michon-Pasturel, M Jamelot, M K Nguessan, A Hij, C Le Maignan, D Farge, C Frère
Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a frequent and serious complication in cancer patients, and the second leading cause of death in this setting. Cancer patients are also more likely to present recurrent VTE and major bleeding while taking anticoagulants. Management of VTE in these patients is always challenging and remains suboptimal worldwide. In 2013, the International Initiative on Thrombosis and Cancer (ITAC-CME) released international guidelines for the treatment and prophylaxis of VTE and central venous catheter-associated thrombosis, based on a systematic review of the literature ranked according to the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation scale...
December 2017: Journal de Médecine Vasculaire
Jacqueline M L Halton, Anne-Caroline Picard, Ruth Harper, Fenglei Huang, Martina Brueckmann, Savion Gropper, Hugo Maas, Igor Tartakovsky, Ildar Nurmeev, Lesley G Mitchell, Leonardo R Brandão, Elizabeth Chalmers, Manuela Albisetti
Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is more frequent in infants than in older children. Treatment guidelines in children are adapted from adult VTE data, but do not currently include direct oral anticoagulant use. Dabigatran etexilate (DE) use in the paediatric population with VTE therefore requires verification. We investigated the pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) relationship, safety and tolerability of DE oral liquid formulation (OLF) in infants with VTE (aged < 12 months) who had completed standard anticoagulant treatment in an open-label, phase IIa study...
November 2017: Thrombosis and Haemostasis
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