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Physician-assisted suicide

M A J M Buijsen
Physicians are regularly confronted with pharmacists who refuse to provide euthanasia drugs. They do not always understand that the provision of euthanasia drugs is not a normal professional activity for pharmacists. It is a lot less clear that pharmacists are also allowed to have fundamental objections. In addition, professional standards lack clarity for pharmacists who do not have such objections to the provision of euthanasia drugs. The relationship between physicians and pharmacists in the context of euthanasia presents problems overlooked by researchers of the third evaluation of the Termination of Life on Request and Assisted Suicide (review procedures) Act (WTL)...
2018: Nederlands Tijdschrift Voor Geneeskunde
Joris Vandenberghe
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
March 8, 2018: New England Journal of Medicine
Irene Tuffrey-Wijne, Leopold Curfs, Ilora Finlay, Sheila Hollins
BACKGROUND: Euthanasia and assisted suicide (EAS) have been legally possible in the Netherlands since 2001, provided that statutory due care criteria are met, including: (a) voluntary and well-considered request; (b) unbearable suffering without prospect of improvement; (c) informing the patient; (d) lack of a reasonable alternative; (e) independent second physician's opinion. 'Unbearable suffering' must have a medical basis, either somatic or psychiatric, but there is no requirement of limited life expectancy...
March 5, 2018: BMC Medical Ethics
David Gibbes Miller, Rebecca Dresser, Scott Y H Kim
Authorising euthanasia and assisted suicide with advance euthanasia directives (AEDs) is permitted, yet debated, in the Netherlands. We focus on a recent controversial case in which a Dutch woman with Alzheimer's disease was euthanised based on her AED. A Dutch euthanasia review committee found that the physician performing the euthanasia failed to follow due care requirements for euthanasia and assisted suicide. This case is notable because it is the first case to trigger a criminal investigation since the 2002 Dutch euthanasia law was enacted...
March 3, 2018: Journal of Medical Ethics
N Rose Gaston, Jill M Randall, Lisa R Kiesel
Physician-assisted suicide (PAS) is explicitly legal in five states and by court decision in one. Legislative bills have been introduced in other states including Minnesota, Iowa, and Wisconsin. This quantitative study was designed to understand Midwest, hospice and palliative care at end-of-life social workers' attitudes toward PAS, preferred terminology, perception of preparedness for the implementation, and awareness of PAS legislation in their state. Sixty-two social workers from Minnesota, Iowa, and Wisconsin completed an anonymous online survey...
March 1, 2018: Journal of Social Work in End-of-life & Palliative Care
Lars H Breimer, Torbjörn K Nilsson, Michael E Breimer
Declaration of conflicts of interest (COI, understood mainly as financial) in medical publications is long established. Most journals refer only to the guidelines of the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors (ICMJE) but not to those of the WAME (World Association of Medical Editors). We surveyed 17 journals and found only one (BJOG), which explicitly mentioned "religious interest" as an example of a possible COI and one other journal included "personal belief" (Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology of India) as a COI...
February 7, 2018: Indian Journal of Medical Ethics
Robert Preston
Background: Physician-administered euthanasia (PAE) was legalized, along with physician-assisted suicide (PAS), in The Netherlands in 2001. Sources of data: Annual reports of the Dutch Regional Euthanasia Review Committees, the committees' 2015 published Code of Practice and research studies. Areas of agreement: There is a general openness about the practice of PAE/PAS in The Netherlands and an avoidance of misleading euphemisms. The 2001 law also includes arrangements for post-event review of PAE/PAS decisions...
February 12, 2018: British Medical Bulletin
Mohammad Mustaqim Malek, Noor Naemah Abdul Rahman, Mohd Shahnaz Hasan, Luqman Haji Abdullah
In end-of-life situation, the need for patient's preference comes into the picture with the intention of guiding physicians in the direction of patient care. Preference in medical directive is made by a person with full mental capacity outlining what actions should be taken for his health should he loses his competency. This is based on the reality of universal paradigm in medical practice that emphasises patient's autonomy. A specific directive is produced according to a patient's wish that might include some ethically and religiously controversial directives such as mercy killing, physician-assisted suicide, forgoing life-supporting treatments and do-not-resuscitate...
February 7, 2018: Journal of Religion and Health
Andrew McGee, Franklin G Miller
BACKGROUND: A competent patient has the right to refuse foods and fluids even if the patient will die. The exercise of this right, known as voluntarily stopping eating and drinking (VSED), is sometimes proposed as an alternative to physician assisted suicide. However, there is ethical and legal uncertainty about physician involvement in VSED. Are physicians advising of this option, or making patients comfortable while they undertake VSED, assisting suicide? This paper attempts to resolve this ethical and legal uncertainty...
December 27, 2017: BMC Medicine
Erwin Stolz, Hannes Mayerl, Peter Gasser-Steiner, Wolfgang Freidl
BACKGROUND: Care-dependency constitutes an important issue with regard to the approval of end-of-life decisions, yet attitudes towards assisted suicide and euthanasia are understudied among care-dependent older adults. We assessed attitudes towards assisted suicide and euthanasia and tested empirical correlates, including socio-demographics, religiosity, physical illness, psychological distress and social isolation. METHODS: A nationwide cross-sectional survey among older care allowance recipients (50+) in private households in Austria was conducted in 2016...
December 7, 2017: BMC Medical Ethics
William Feigelman, Rebecca L Sanford, Julie Cerel
Several previous studies suggested that primary care physicians can provide important bereavement assistance to survivors of suicide, yet no study has investigated whether suicide-bereaved patients perceive their physicians as helpful. Contacting bereavement communities on social media, we collected online survey data from 146 bereaved respondents reporting suicides causing them severe emotional distress. Data analysis suggested that nearly half (48%) of the respondents encountered positive, help-offering responses from physicians, compared to 10% whose responses were deemed as negative...
January 1, 2017: Omega
Malcolm H Parker
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
November 20, 2017: Medical Journal of Australia
David Gibbes Miller, Scott Y H Kim
ObjectivesTo assess how Dutch regional euthanasia review committees (RTE) apply the euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide (EAS) due care criteria in cases where the criteria are judged not to have been met ('due care not met' (DCNM)) and to evaluate how the criteria function to set limits in Dutch EAS practice. DESIGN: A qualitative review using directed content analysis of DCNM cases in the Netherlands from 2012 to 2016 published on the RTE website (https://www.euthanasiecommissie...
October 25, 2017: BMJ Open
Ralf J Jox, Isra Black, Gian Domenico Borasio, Johanna Anneser
BACKGROUND: Physician-assisted dying has been the subject of extensive discussion and legislative activity both in Europe and North America. In this context, dying by voluntary stopping of eating and drinking (VSED) is often proposed, and practiced, as an alternative method of self-determined dying, with medical support for VSED being regarded as ethically and legally justified. ARGUMENT: In our opinion, this view is flawed. First, we argue that VSED falls within the concept of suicide, albeit with certain unique features (non-invasiveness, initial reversibility, resemblance to the natural dying process)...
October 20, 2017: BMC Medicine
Robert M Sade, Minoo N Kavarana
Ethical behavior has always been deeply ingrained in surgical culture, but ethical deliberation has only recently become an important component of cardiac surgical practice. In our earlier review, we covered a range of issues including several related to informed consent, conflict of interest, professional self-regulation and innovation, among many others. This update covers several topics of interest to cardiac surgeons and cardiologists, focusing on controversial issues specific to the practice of cardiothoracic surgery: informed consent, relations with hospitals and euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide...
October 20, 2017: Future Cardiology
Jeffrey Kirby
There has been contentious debate over the years about whether there are morally relevant similarities and differences between the three practices of continuous deep sedation until death, physician-assisted suicide, and voluntary euthanasia. Surprisingly little academic attention has been paid to a comparison of the uses of these practices in the two types of circumstances in which they are typically performed. A comparative domains of ethics analysis methodological approach is used in the paper to compare 1) the use of the three practices in paradigm circumstances, and 2) the use of the practices in paradigm circumstances to their use in non-paradigm circumstances...
December 2017: Journal of Bioethical Inquiry
Timothy E Quill, Robert M Arnold, Stuart J Youngner
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
October 17, 2017: Annals of Internal Medicine
Lois Snyder Sulmasy, Paul S Mueller
Calls to legalize physician-assisted suicide have increased and public interest in the subject has grown in recent years despite ethical prohibitions. Many people have concerns about how they will die and the emphasis by medicine and society on intervention and cure has sometimes come at the expense of good end-of-life care. Some have advocated strongly, on the basis of autonomy, that physician-assisted suicide should be a legal option at the end of life. As a proponent of patient-centered care, the American College of Physicians (ACP) is attentive to all voices, including those who speak of the desire to control when and how life will end...
October 17, 2017: Annals of Internal Medicine
William G Kussmaul
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
October 17, 2017: Annals of Internal Medicine
Rebecca A Spence, Charles D Blanke, Thomas J Keating, Lynne P Taylor
Physician aid in dying (PAD) or assisted suicide is becoming legal in more US jurisdictions. Meanwhile, the needs of terminally ill patients with cancer are receiving greater attention, including the integration of palliative care into oncology practice. This article highlights a case vignette of a patient with advanced cancer who requests PAD from her oncologist, as a backdrop to help the practicing oncologist examine his or her moral stance regarding participation in aid in dying. The article concludes by offering a framework within which the practicing oncologist can receive and process a patient's request for PAD...
October 2017: Journal of Oncology Practice
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