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GPCR signaling

Megan Allen, Suhasini Ghosh, Gerard P Ahern, Sonia Villapol, Kathleen A Maguire-Zeiss, Katherine Conant
Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are a family of secreted endopeptidases expressed by neurons and glia. Regulated MMP activity contributes to physiological synaptic plasticity, while dysregulated activity can stimulate injury. Disentangling the role individual MMPs play in synaptic plasticity is difficult due to overlapping structure and function as well as cell-type specific expression. Here, we develop a novel system to investigate the selective overexpression of a single MMP driven by GFAP expressing cells in vivo...
October 20, 2016: Scientific Reports
Nariman Balenga, Pedram Azimzadeh, Joyce A Hogue, Paul N Staats, Yuhong Shi, James Koh, Holly Dressman, John A Olson
Abnormal feedback of serum calcium to parathyroid hormone (PTH) secretion is the hallmark of primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT). While the molecular pathogenesis of parathyroid neoplasia in PHPT has been linked to abnormal expression of genes involved in cell growth (i.e. cyclin D1, retinoblastoma and β catenin), the molecular basis of abnormal calcium sensing by calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) and PTH hypersecretion in PHPT are incompletely understood. Through gene expression profiling, we discovered that an orphan adhesion G protein-coupled receptor, GPR64/ADGRG2 is expressed in human normal parathyroid glands and is overexpressed in parathyroid tumors from patients with PHPT...
October 19, 2016: Journal of Bone and Mineral Research: the Official Journal of the American Society for Bone and Mineral Research
Eun-Kyung Kwon, Chan-Ki Min, Yuri Kim, Jae-Won Lee, Abdimadiyeva Aigerim, Sebastian Schmidt, Hyun-Jun Nam, Seong Kyu Han, Kuglae Kim, Jeong Seok Cha, Hoyoung Kim, Sanguk Kim, Hyun-Soo Cho, Myung-Sik Choi, Nam-Hyuk Cho
Members of the herpesviral family use multiple strategies to hijack infected host cells and exploit cellular signaling for their pathogenesis and latent infection. Among the most intriguing weapons in the arsenal of pathogenic herpesviruses are the constitutively active virally-encoded G protein-coupled receptors (vGPCRs). Even though vGPCRs contribute to viral pathogenesis such as immune evasion and proliferative disorders, the molecular details of how vGPCRs continuously activate cellular signaling are largely unknown...
October 15, 2016: Biochimica et Biophysica Acta
Guoqiang Ma, Shuang Li, Yuhong Han, Shuangxi Li, Tao Yue, Bing Wang, Jin Jiang
Hedgehog (Hh) signaling plays a central role in development and diseases. Hh activates its signal transducer and GPCR-family protein Smoothened (Smo) by inducing Smo phosphorylation, but whether Smo is activated through other post-translational modifications remains unexplored. Here we show that sumoylation acts in parallel with phosphorylation to promote Smo cell-surface expression and Hh signaling. We find that Hh stimulates Smo sumoylation by dissociating it from a desumoylation enzyme Ulp1. Sumoylation of Smo in turn recruits a deubiquitinase UBPY/USP8 to antagonize Smo ubiquitination and degradation, leading to its cell-surface accumulation and elevated Hh pathway activity...
October 7, 2016: Developmental Cell
Youn Yi Jo, Ji Yeon Lee, Chul-Kyu Park
The neuropeptide substance P (SP) is expressed in primary sensory neurons and is commonly regarded as a "pain" neurotransmitter. Upon peripheral inflammation, SP activates the neurokinin-1 (NK-1) receptor and potentiates activity of transient receptor potential vanilloid subtype 1 (TRPV1), which is coexpressed by nociceptive neurons. Therefore, SP functions as an important neurotransmitter involved in the hypersensitization of inflammatory pain. Resolvin E1 (RvE1), derived from omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, inhibits TRPV1 activity via activation of the chemerin 23 receptor (ChemR23)-an RvE1 receptor located in dorsal root ganglion neurons-and therefore exerts an inhibitory effect on inflammatory pain...
2016: Mediators of Inflammation
Nan Gao, Tao Liang, Yuan Yuan, Xiuchan Xiao, Yihuan Zhao, Yanzhi Guo, Menglong Li, Xuemei Pu
G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are important drug targets and generally activated by ligands. However, some experiments found that GPCRs also give rise to constitutive activity through some mutations (viz., CAM), which are usually associated with different kinds of diseases. However, the mechanisms of CAMs and their roles in interactions with drug-ligands are unclear in experiments. Herein, we used microsecond molecular dynamics simulations to study the effect of one important F282L mutation on β2AR in order to address the questions above...
October 13, 2016: Physical Chemistry Chemical Physics: PCCP
Nijiro Nohata, Yusuke Goto, J Silvio Gutkind
The G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) family is the largest family of cell-surface receptors involved in signal transduction. Aberrant expression of GPCRs and G proteins are frequently associated with prevalent human diseases, including cancer. In fact, GPCRs represent the therapeutic targets of more than a quarter of the clinical drugs currently on the market. MiRNAs (miRNAs) are also aberrantly expressed in many human cancers, and they have significant roles in the initiation, development and metastasis of human malignancies...
October 13, 2016: Journal of Human Genetics
Issei S Shimada, Saikat Mukhopadhyay
Disruption of the normal mechanisms that mediate neural tube closure can result in neural tube defects (NTDs) with devastating consequences in affected patients. With the advent of next-generation sequencing, we are increasingly detecting mutations in multiple genes in NTD cases. However, our ability to determine which of these genes contribute to the malformation is limited by our understanding of the pathways controlling neural tube closure. G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) comprise the largest family of transmembrane receptors in humans and have been historically favored as drug targets...
October 12, 2016: Birth Defects Research. Part A, Clinical and Molecular Teratology
Inken Lorenzen, Juliane Lokau, Yvonne Korpys, Mirja Oldefest, Charlotte M Flynn, Ulrike Künzel, Christoph Garbers, Matthew Freeman, Joachim Grötzinger, Stefan Düsterhöft
An important, irreversible step in many signalling pathways is the shedding of membrane-anchored proteins. A Disintegrin And Metalloproteinase (ADAM) 17 is one of the major sheddases involved in a variety of physiological and pathophysiological processes including regeneration, differentiation, and cancer progression. This central role in signalling implies that ADAM17 activity has to be tightly regulated, including at the level of localisation. Most mature ADAM17 is localised intracellularly, with only a small amount at the cell surface...
October 12, 2016: Scientific Reports
Jin Xiang, Eugene Chun, Chang Liu, Liang Jing, Zina Al-Sahouri, Lan Zhu, Wei Liu
G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) constitute the largest class of drug targets in the human genome, which highlights the importance of understanding the molecular basis of their activation, downstream signaling, and regulation. Since 2007, great progress has been made in the field of GPCR structure determination and their signaling complexes at the molecular level. Here, we summarize the high-resolution structures of over 30 different GPCRs with their co-crystallized ligands, and outline the successful strategies involved, including construct design, expression systems, and lipidic cubic phase (LCP) composition, and the many key technical parameters of the crystallization methods...
October 7, 2016: Trends in Pharmacological Sciences
Frederick J Ehlert, Richard Sl Stein
We describe a method for estimating the affinities of ligands for active and inactive states of a G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR). Our protocol involves measuring agonist-induced signaling responses of a wild type GPCR and a constitutively active mutant of it under control conditions and after partial receptor inactivation or reduced receptor expression. Our subsequent analysis is based on the assumption that the activating mutation increases receptor isomerization into the active state without affecting the affinities of ligands for receptor states...
October 7, 2016: Journal of Pharmacological and Toxicological Methods
Sebastian George Barton Furness, Yi-Lynn Liang, Cameron James Nowell, Michelle Louise Halls, Peter John Wookey, Emma Dal Maso, Asuka Inoue, Arthur Christopoulos, Denise Wootten, Patrick Michael Sexton
G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) signaling, mediated by hetero-trimeric G proteins, can be differentially controlled by agonists. At a molecular level, this is thought to occur principally via stabilization of distinct receptor conformations by individual ligands. These distinct conformations control subsequent recruitment of transducer and effector proteins. Here, we report that ligand efficacy at the calcitonin GPCR (CTR) is also correlated with ligand-dependent alterations to G protein conformation. We observe ligand-dependent differences in the sensitivity of the G protein ternary complex to disruption by GTP, due to conformational differences in the receptor-bound G protein hetero-trimer...
October 20, 2016: Cell
L Xu, L Li, P Yang, Z Ma
The migratory locust (Locusta migratoria) shows aggregative traits in nymph marching bands and swarm formations through mutual olfactory attraction of conspecifics. However, olfactory preference in different nymph stages in gregarious locusts is not sufficiently explored. In this study, we found that the nymph olfactory preference for gregarious volatiles exhibited obvious variations at different developmental stages. The gregarious locusts show attractive response to conspecific volatiles from the third stadium...
October 7, 2016: Insect Molecular Biology
Pierre-Michaël Coly, Nicolas Perzo, Vadim Le Joncour, Céline Lecointre, Marie-Thérèse Schouft, Laurence Desrues, Marie-Christine Tonon, Olivier Wurtz, Pierrick Gandolfo, Hélène Castel, Fabrice Morin
Chemotactic migration is a fundamental behavior of cells and its regulation is particularly relevant in physiological processes such as organogenesis and angiogenesis, as well as in pathological processes such as tumor metastasis. The majority of chemotactic stimuli activate cell surface receptors that belong to the G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) superfamily. Although the autophagy machinery has been shown to play a role in cell migration, its mode of regulation by chemotactic GPCRs remains largely unexplored...
October 7, 2016: Autophagy
Daria R Bulanova, Yevhen A Akimov, Anne Rokka, Teemu D Laajala, Tero Aittokallio, Petri Kouvonen, Teijo Pellinen, Sergey G Kuznetsov
G-Protein Coupled Receptor (GPCR), Class C, Group 5, Member A (GPRC5A) has been implicated in several malignancies. The underlying mechanisms, however, remain poorly understood. Using a panel of human cell lines, we demonstrate that CRISPR/Cas9-mediated knockout and RNAi-mediated depletion of GPRC5A impairs cell adhesion to integrin substrates: collagens I and IV, fibronectin, as well as to extracellular matrix proteins derived from the Engelbreth-Holm-Swarm (EHS) mouse sarcoma (Matrigel). Consistent with the phenotype, knock-out of GPRC5A correlated with a reduced integrin β1 (ITGB1) protein expression, impaired phosphorylation of the focal adhesion kinase (FAK), and lower activity of small GTPases RhoA and Rac1...
October 7, 2016: Cell Adhesion & Migration
Nicole E Brown, Nevin A Lambert, John R Hepler
RGS14 is a multifunctional scaffolding protein possessing two distinct G protein interaction sites including a regulator of G protein signaling (RGS) domain that acts as a GTPase activating protein (GAP) to deactivate Gαi/o-GTP proteins, and a G protein regulatory (GPR) motif that binds inactive Gαi1/3-GDP proteins independent of Gβγ. GPR interactions with Gαi recruit RGS14 to the plasma membrane to interact with Gαi-linked GPCRs and regulate Gαi signaling. While RGS14 actions on Gα proteins are well characterized, consequent effects on Gβγ signaling remain unknown...
October 2016: Pharmacology Research & Perspectives
David R Janero, Ganesh A Thakur
Allosteric modulators of G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) hold the promise of improved pharmacology and safety over typical orthosteric GPCR ligands. These features are particularly relevant to the cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1R) GPCR, since typical orthosteric CB1R ligands are associated with adverse events that limit their translational potential. Areas covered: The contextual basis for applying allostery to CB1R is considered from pharmacological, drug-discovery, and medicinal standpoints. Rational design of small-molecule CB1R allosteric modulators as potential pharmacotherapeutics would be greatly facilitated by direct experimental characterization of structure-function correlates underlying the biological activity of chemically-diverse CB1R allosteric modulators, CB1R allosteric ligand-binding binding pockets, and amino acid contact residues critical to allosteric ligand engagement and activity...
October 7, 2016: Expert Opinion on Drug Discovery
Ofra Barchad-Avitzur, Michael F Priest, Noa Dekel, Francisco Bezanilla, Hanna Parnas, Yair Ben-Chaim
G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) mediate many signal transduction processes in the body. The discovery that these receptors are voltage-sensitive has changed our understanding of their behavior. The M2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (M2R) was found to exhibit depolarization-induced charge movement-associated currents, implying that this prototypical GPCR possesses a voltage sensor. However, the typical domain that serves as a voltage sensor in voltage-gated channels is not present in GPCRs, making the search for the voltage sensor in the latter challenging...
October 4, 2016: Biophysical Journal
Giovanni Luchetti, Ria Sircar, Jennifer H Kong, Sigrid Nachtergaele, Andreas Sagner, Eamon Fx Byrne, Douglas F Covey, Christian Siebold, Rajat Rohatgi
Cholesterol is necessary for the function of many G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs). We find that cholesterol is not just necessary but also sufficient to activate signaling by the Hedgehog (Hh) pathway, a prominent cell-cell communication system in development. Cholesterol influences Hh signaling by directly activating Smoothened (SMO), an orphan GPCR that transmits the Hh signal across the membrane in all animals. Unlike most GPCRs, which are regulated by cholesterol through their heptahelical transmembrane domains, SMO is activated by cholesterol through its extracellular cysteine-rich domain (CRD)...
October 5, 2016: ELife
H C Stephen Chan, Slawomir Filipek, Shuguang Yuan
G protein-coupled receptors are recognized as one of the largest families of membrane proteins. Despite sharing a characteristic seven-transmembrane topology, G protein-coupled receptors regulate a wide range of cellular signaling pathways in response to various physical and chemical stimuli, and prevail as an important target for drug discovery. Notably, the recent progress in crystallographic methods led to a breakthrough in elucidating the structures of membrane proteins. The structures of β2-adrenergic receptor bound with a variety of ligands provide atomic details of the binding modes of agonists, antagonists and inverse agonists...
October 5, 2016: Scientific Reports
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