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face memory

André Klapper, Ron Dotsch, Iris van Rooij, Daniël H J Wigboldus
It is widely assumed among psychologists that people spontaneously form trustworthiness impressions of newly encountered people from their facial appearance. However, most existing studies directly or indirectly induced an impression formation goal, which means that the existing empirical support for spontaneous facial trustworthiness impressions remains insufficient. In particular, it remains an open question whether trustworthiness from facial appearance is encoded in memory. Using the 'who said what' paradigm, we indirectly measured to what extent people encoded the trustworthiness of observed faces...
November 2016: Journal of Personality and Social Psychology
Steve D Charman, Andrea Reyes, Daniella K Villalba, Jacqueline R Evans
Some innocent suspects rely on the memory of strangers to corroborate their alibis. However, no research has examined whether such potential alibi corroborators can accurately recognize an innocent suspect with whom they previously interacted. We developed a novel alibi corroboration paradigm in which undergraduate students (representing innocent suspects who would later provide an alibi) interacted with naïve university employees (representing potential alibi corroborators). Each student briefly interacted with a different naïve university employee (n = 60), and were also each yoked to a different employee with whom they did not interact (n = 60)...
October 19, 2016: Behavioral Sciences & the Law
Maria Teresa Turano, Maria Pia Viggiano
The relationship between face recognition ability and socioemotional functioning has been widely explored. However, how aging modulates this association regarding both objective performance and subjective-perception is still neglected. Participants, aged between 18 and 81 years, performed a face memory test and completed subjective face recognition and socioemotional questionnaires. General and social anxiety, and neuroticism traits account for the individual variation in face recognition abilities during adulthood...
October 18, 2016: Neuropsychology, Development, and Cognition. Section B, Aging, Neuropsychology and Cognition
Nicola Jones, Leigh M Riby, Michael A Smith
BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Older adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2) exhibit accelerated decline in some domains of cognition including verbal episodic memory. Few studies have investigated the influence of DM2 status in older adults on recognition memory for more complex stimuli such as faces. In the present study we sought to compare recognition memory performance for words, objects and faces under conditions of relatively low and high cognitive load. METHODS: Healthy older adults with good glucoregulatory control (n = 13) and older adults with DM2 (n = 24) were administered recognition memory tasks in which stimuli (faces, objects and words) were presented under conditions of either i) low (stimulus presented without a background pattern) or ii) high (stimulus presented against a background pattern) cognitive load...
July 2016: Archives of Medical Research
Andrew C Lynn, Aarthi Padmanabhan, Daniel Simmonds, William Foran, Michael N Hallquist, Beatriz Luna, Kirsten O'Hearn
Face recognition abilities improve between adolescence and adulthood over typical development (TD), but plateau in autism, leading to increasing face recognition deficits in autism later in life. Developmental differences between autism and TD may reflect changes between neural systems involved in the development of face encoding and recognition. Here, we focused on whole-brain connectivity with the fusiform face area (FFA), a well-established face-preferential brain region. Older children, adolescents, and adults with and without autism completed the Cambridge Face Memory Test, and a matched car memory test, during fMRI scanning...
October 16, 2016: Developmental Science
Barnan Das, Diane J Cook, Narayanan C Krishnan, Maureen Schmitter-Edgecombe
Caring for individuals with dementia is frequently associated with extreme physical and emotional stress, which often leads to depression. Smart home technology and advances in machine learning techniques can provide innovative solutions to reduce caregiver burden. One key service that caregivers provide is prompting individuals with memory limitations to initiate and complete daily activities. We hypothesize that sensor technologies combined with machine learning techniques can automate the process of providing reminder-based interventions...
August 2016: IEEE Journal of Selected Topics in Signal Processing
Nicolas A McNair, Patrick T Goodbourn, Lauren T Shone, Irina M Harris
We used the attentional blink (AB) paradigm to investigate the processing stage at which extraction of summary statistics from visual stimuli ("ensemble coding") occurs. Experiment 1 examined whether ensemble coding requires attentional engagement with the items in the ensemble. Participants performed two sequential tasks on each trial: gender discrimination of a single face (T1) and estimating the average emotional expression of an ensemble of four faces (or of a single face, as a control condition) as T2...
October 13, 2016: Attention, Perception & Psychophysics
Namita A Padgaonkar, Theodore P Zanto, Jacob Bollinger, Adam Gazzaley
Older adults, compared to younger adults, do not benefit from predictive information regarding either what type of stimuli they will see or when to expect them, yet it is unclear whether older adults benefit when given both types of predictive information. Here, electroencephalogram recordings of older (aged 62-87 years) and younger (aged 20-32 years) adults were recorded during a working memory task. Each trial contained 2 faces and 2 scenes presented sequentially, followed by a 5-second delay and a probe stimulus...
September 13, 2016: Neurobiology of Aging
Valeria Peviani, Pina Scarpa, Alessio Toraldo, Gabriella Bottini
Neuropsychological assessment is critical in both diagnosis and prognosis of patients with epilepsy. Beyond electrophysiological and anatomical alterations, other factors including different ethnic-cultural and linguistic backgrounds might affect neuropsychological performance. Only a few studies considered migration and acculturation effects and they typically concerned nonclinical samples. The current study aimed at investigating the influence of ethnic background and time spent in Italy on a full neuropsychological battery administered to both Italian and foreign-born patients and at providing a brief interview for obtaining relevant information on each patient's transcultural and language-related history...
October 10, 2016: Epilepsy & Behavior: E&B
Mark Tippens Reinitz, Geoffrey R Loftus
The authors used a state-trace methodology to investigate the informational dimensions used to recognize old and conjunction faces (made by combining parts of separately studied faces). Participants in 3 experiments saw faces presented for 1 s each. They then received a recognition test; faces were presented for varying brief durations and participants made 3 responses: old/new judgments, confidence judgments, and an indication of whether each response was based on memory for a feature or in general familiarity...
October 13, 2016: Journal of Experimental Psychology. Learning, Memory, and Cognition
Brenna M Flannery, Donald A Bruun, Douglas J Rowland, Christopher N Banks, Adam T Austin, David L Kukis, Yonggang Li, Byron D Ford, Daniel J Tancredi, Jill L Silverman, Simon R Cherry, Pamela J Lein
BACKGROUND: Acute intoxication with organophosphorus (OP) cholinesterase inhibitors can trigger convulsions that progress to life-threatening status epilepticus. Survivors face long-term morbidity including mild-to-severe decline in memory. It is posited that neuroinflammation plays a key role in the pathogenesis of OP-induced neuropsychiatric deficits. Rigorous testing of this hypothesis requires preclinical models that recapitulate relevant phenotypic outcomes. Here, we describe a rat model of acute intoxication with the OP diisopropylfluorophosphate (DFP) that exhibits persistent neuroinflammation and cognitive impairment...
October 12, 2016: Journal of Neuroinflammation
Klajdi Puka, Mary Lou Smith
OBJECTIVE: Little is known about the long-term cognitive outcomes following pediatric epilepsy surgery. Although the evidence for change within the first 2 years is not compelling, the plasticity of the immature brain may allow for improvements in the long term. This study examined memory function in a cohort of surgical and nonsurgical patients at baseline and 4-11 years after. METHOD: Participants were 88 patients (mean age 20.05, standard deviation [SD] 4.21 years) with childhood-onset intractable epilepsy; 53 had undergone resective epilepsy surgery...
October 12, 2016: Epilepsia
Helen Costello, Gillian M Hayes, Elizabeth Highton-Williamson, Shirley Nurock, Dave Hanbury, Paul T Francis
OBJECTIVE: Test the feasibility of assessing cognition, psychiatric symptoms and daily living skills of potential brain donors by telephone and compare satisfaction and attitudes across telephone and face-to-face assessment. METHOD: Data were collected from 108 healthy participants from the Brains for Dementia Research cohort. Purposive sampling was used to assess feasibility and a randomised control trial design compared satisfaction and attitudes towards telephone and face-to-face assessment...
October 7, 2016: International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry
Anna K Bobak, Philip Pampoulov, Sarah Bate
The Cambridge Face Memory Test Long Form (CFMT+) and Cambridge Face Perception Test (CFPT) are typically used to assess the face processing ability of individuals who believe they have superior face recognition skills. Previous large-scale studies have presented norms for the CFPT but not the CFMT+. However, previous research has also highlighted the necessity for establishing country-specific norms for these tests, indicating that norming data is required for both tests using young British adults. The current study addressed this issue in 254 British participants...
2016: Frontiers in Psychology
Lars Westberg, Susanne Henningsson, Anna Zettergren, Joakim Svärd, Daniel Hovey, Tian Lin, Natalie C Ebner, Håkan Fischer
The ability to recognize faces is crucial for daily social interactions. Recent studies suggest that intranasal oxytocin administration improves social recognition in humans. Oxytocin signaling in the amygdala plays an essential role for social recognition in mice, and oxytocin administration has been shown to influence amygdala activity in humans. It is therefore possible that the effects of oxytocin on human social recognition depend on mechanisms that take place in the amygdala-a central region for memory processing also in humans...
2016: Frontiers in Behavioral Neuroscience
Ashley Azar, Kathryn Devlin, Joshua Chang Mell, Tania Giovannetti, Vanessa Pirrone, Michael R Nonnemacher, Shendra Passic, Katherine Kercher, Jean W Williams, Jeffery M Jacobson, Brian Wigdahl, William Dampier, David J Libon, Christian Sell
Evolutionary divergence of the mitochondrial genome has given rise to distinct haplogroups. These haplogroups have arisen in specific geographical locations and are responsible for subtle functional changes in the mitochondria that may provide an evolutionary advantage in a given environment. Based on these functional differences, haplogroups could define disease susceptibility in chronic settings. In this study, we undertook a detailed neuropsychological analysis of a cohort of long-term HIV-1-infected individuals in conjunction with sequencing of their mitochondrial genomes...
2016: PloS One
Roger Ratcliff, Per Sederberg, Troy Smith, Russ Childers
Recent work in perceptual decision-making has shown that although two distinct neural components differentiate experimental conditions (e.g., did you see a face or a car), only one tracked the evidence guiding the decision process. In the memory literature, there is a distinction between a fronto-central evoked potential measured with EEG beginning at 350 ms that seems to track familiarity and a late parietal evoked potential that peaks at 600 ms that tracks recollection. Here, we applied single-trial regressor analysis (similar to multivariate pattern analysis MVPA) and diffusion decision modeling to EEG and behavioral data from two recognition memory experiments to test whether these two components contribute to the recognition decision process...
September 29, 2016: Neuropsychologia
V Prakash, Mohan Ganesan, R Vasanthan, K Hariohm
OBJECTIVES: In India, post-stroke outcomes are determined using functional outcome measures (FOMs), the contents of which have not been validated for their relevance to the Indian population. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the cultural validity of five frequently used stroke-specific FOMs by comparing their contents with the problems reported by patients with stroke in India. METHODS: Face-to-face structured interviews were conducted with 152 patients diagnosed with stroke in India...
September 27, 2016: Topics in Stroke Rehabilitation
Sara E Alger, Jessica D Payne
Relational memories are formed from shared components between directly learned memory associations, flexibly linking learned information to better inform future judgments. Sleep has been found to facilitate both direct associative and relational memories. However, the impact of incorporating emotionally salient information into learned material and the interaction of emotional salience and sleep in facilitating both types of memory is unknown. Participants encoded two sets of picture pairs, with either emotionally negative or neutral objects paired with neutral faces...
September 26, 2016: Cognitive, Affective & Behavioral Neuroscience
L Manderino, M B Spitznagel, G Strain, M Devlin, R Cohen, R D Crosby, J E Mitchell, J Gunstad
OBJECTIVE: Deficits in traditional cognitive domains (e.g. executive function and memory) are common in persons with severe obesity, but it is unclear if this pattern of dysfunction extends to social cognition. The present study examined whether cognitive impairment was associated with poorer emotion recognition in bariatric surgery candidates. METHODS: One hundred sixteen bariatric surgery candidates (mean age = 43.62 ± 11.03; 81% female) completed the computerized Integneuro test battery as part of a larger study visit...
December 2015: Obesity Science & Practice
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