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disparities research

Yousef Jaradat, Morten Birkeland Nielsen, Petter Kristensen, Rita Bast-Pettersen
BACKGROUND: Shift work is associated with sleep disturbances, mental health problems, and job dissatisfaction. Disparities between male and female nurses in the effect of shift work on mental distress and job satisfaction have been scarcely studied. We aimed to examine differences between female and male nurses in the associations between shift work and job satisfaction and mental health. METHODS: In this cross-sectional study, male and female nurses were recruited to rate their job satisfaction on the Generic Job Satisfaction Scale and to complete the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-30)...
February 21, 2018: Lancet
Joseph E Glass, Emily C Williams
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
March 2018: Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs
Jenny Olofsson, Mojgan Padyab, Gunnar Malmberg
BACKGROUND: Previous research suggests that the social network may play very different roles in relation to health in countries with differing welfare regimes. OBJECTIVE: The study aimed to assess the interplay between social network, socioeconomic position, and self-rated health (SRH) in European countries. METHODS: The study used cross-sectional data on individuals aged 50+ from the fourth wave of the Survey of Health, Ageing and Retirement in Europe (SHARE) and includes data from 16 countries...
2018: Global Health Action
Benjamin W Fisher, Thomas J Mowen, John H Boman
Although school security measures have become a common fixture in public schools across the United States, research on the relationship between security and adolescent victimization is mixed, with very few studies examining trends in adolescent victimization across time. Using two waves of data from the Educational Longitudinal Study 2002 (N = 7659; 50.6% female; 56.7% White, 13.3% Black, 13.5% Hispanic, 11.3% Asian American, 5.4% other race), results from a series of multi-level models demonstrate that adolescents in schools with more security measures report higher odds of being threatened with harm, and no difference in odds of being in a physical altercation or having something stolen over time...
March 19, 2018: Journal of Youth and Adolescence
Laurie E Powers, Ann Fullerton, Jessica Schmidt, Sarah Geenen, Molly Oberweiser-Kennedy, JoAnn Dohn, May Nelson, Rosemary Iavanditti, Jennifer Blakeslee
Research clearly documents the serious challenges and poor outcomes experienced by many young people exiting foster care, as well as compounded disparities for the high percentage of youth in care who are identified with disabilities and/or mental health challenges. However, very little research has been conducted to specify or validate effective models for improving the transition trajectories of youth exiting care. Evidence suggests the My Life self-determination enhancement model offers a promising approach for supporting youths' self-determined and positive transition to adulthood...
February 2018: Children and Youth Services Review
Xuandao Liu, Chew Lip Ng, De Yun Wang
Sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) has been proven to be safe and effective from an abundance of Western literature, but data from Asia is less complete. This review aims to examine the basic science, safety and efficacy of SLIT in Asian patients, and to determine future research needs in Asia. We performed a literature search on PUBMED, Scopus, and Cochrane Library database for articles on SLIT originating from Asian countries through Nov 2017. There were 18 randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trials, of which 9 involved solely paediatric subjects...
March 15, 2018: Allergology International: Official Journal of the Japanese Society of Allergology
Jerel P Calzo, S Bryn Austin, Nadia Micali
Much of the research on sexual orientation disparities in eating disorder behaviors has been conducted in the USA, Canada, and Australia. Data on the associations of sexual orientation and eating disorder symptoms among adolescents in the UK are lacking. Participants were children from the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children, a youth cohort born 1991-1992 (n = 5048; 53% female; 12% sexual minority). Sexual orientation was assessed at 16 years. Eating disorder symptoms were assessed at 14 and 16 years...
March 17, 2018: European Child & Adolescent Psychiatry
Carolien J Aantjes, Andrew Gilmoor, Elena V Syurina, Tamaryn L Crankshaw
OBJECTIVE: To conduct a systematic review of the status of post-abortion care (PAC) provision in Eastern and Southern Africa with particular reference to reach, quality and costs of these services. STUDY DESIGN: We searched Pubmed, EMBASE, Science Direct, POPLINE and Web of Science for articles published between 2000 and October 2017 presenting primary or secondary data from one or more countries in the region. RESULTS: Seventy articles representing data from fourteen countries were abstracted and included in the review...
March 14, 2018: Contraception
Whitney E Zahnd, Amanda J Fogleman, Wiley D Jenkins
INTRODUCTION: Despite having lower overall incidence rates, rural populations tend to have higher cancer mortality rates. Rural populations often have higher rates of cancers with primary and secondary prevention modalities. However, there is limited research on rural-urban differences in incidence by stage. Therefore, the objective was to assess rural-urban differences in cancer rates by stage. METHODS: The North American Association of Central Cancer Registries public use data set (2009-2013) was used to calculate age-adjusted incidence rates and rate ratios (rural versus urban) for all stageable cancers, tobacco-associated cancers, human papillomavirus-associated cancers, and individual cancers with screening modalities...
March 14, 2018: American Journal of Preventive Medicine
Ephraim Shapiro
INTRODUCTION: In general, church attendance can be associated with improved health behaviors and fewer related chronic diseases, suggesting a potential opportunity to counteract worsening health behaviors among some immigrants and thereby reduce health disparities. There is a paucity of research, however, on the relationship between religious involvement and immigrants' health behaviors and whether it varies by host or home country context. AIM: To examine the relationship between religious involvement, measured by church attendance, with health behaviors among Latino immigrants in the United States (U...
March 16, 2018: Journal of Racial and Ethnic Health Disparities
Órla Gilheaney, Leo Fa Stassen, Margaret Walshe
PURPOSE: Temporomandibular disorders (TMDs) are caused by changes in the structure and/or function of the temporomandibular joint, masticatory muscles, and/or osseous components. TMDs can result in oral stage dysphagia (OD) with potential effects on function and patient well-being. Little is known about the prevalence, nature, and management of TMD-related OD. The aims of the present study were to estimate the prevalence and nature of OD in adult TMD patients and to identify the common management techniques used to manage the signs and symptoms of TMD-related OD...
February 20, 2018: Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery
Shana Harris, Rebecca A Weiss
In the United States, competency to stand trial (CST) evaluations ensure that criminal defendants are capable of participating in their defenses, thus ensuring an important legal right. However, some research has suggested that the CST process may be impacted by legally irrelevant factors such as a defendant's race and cultural background. However, the majority of researchers examined factors that are predictive of CST recommendations and decisions. Few studies have focused on potential racial discrepancies in attorney referrals for CST evaluations and whether they are exacerbated by professional experience...
March 2018: International Journal of Law and Psychiatry
Jack Tomlin, Peter Bartlett, Birgit Völlm
Mentally disordered offenders may be sent to secure psychiatric hospitals. These settings can resemble carceral spaces, employing high levels of security restricting resident autonomy, expression and social interaction. However, research exploring the restrictiveness of forensic settings is sparse. A systematic review was therefore undertaken to conceptualize this restrictiveness. Eight databases were searched for papers that address restrictive elements of secure forensic care in a non-cursory way. Fifty sources (empirical articles and policy documents) were included and subject to thematic analysis to identify 1) antecedent conditions to, 2) characteristic attributes, 3) consequences and 4) 'deviant' cases of the developing concept...
March 2018: International Journal of Law and Psychiatry
Stephane M Shepherd, Cynthia Willis-Esqueda, Yin Paradies, Diane Sivasubramaniam, Juanita Sherwood, Teresa Brockie
BACKGROUND: Disparities across a number of health indicators between the general population and particular racial and cultural minority groups including African Americans, Native Americans and Latino/a Americans have been well documented. Some evidence suggests that particular groups may receive poorer standards of care due to biased beliefs or attitudes held by health professionals. Less research has been conducted in specifically non-urban areas with smaller minority populations. METHODS: This study explored the self-reported health care experiences for 117 racial and cultural minority Americans residing in a Mid-Western jurisdiction...
March 16, 2018: International Journal for Equity in Health
Nathan H Johnson, Carol Vidal, Flavius R W Lilly
Background: Current prevalence estimates are 15% for depression and 20% for anxiety disorders among college students. These disorders are known to negatively impact academic achievement and persistence. It is important to understand the effects of parental military service on the mental health of children across development. The purpose of this study is to examine the influence of being raised in a military household on current and historical depression and anxiety disorders among college students...
March 14, 2018: Military Medicine
Krystin A Engelhardt, Elizabeth Hisle-Gorman, Gregory H Gorman, Nicole R Dobson
Background: The Military Health System (MHS) provides universal access to medical care to active duty service members, retirees, and their dependents. Observational data from small studies suggest lower preterm birth rates in the MHS compared with U.S. national averages. The objectives of this study are to determine the rate of preterm birth in the MHS from 2006 to 2012 compared with national rates and to analyze the impact of demographic factors on preterm birth in a universal access health care system...
March 14, 2018: Military Medicine
Kimberly Coughlin, R David Hayward, Mary Fessler, Elango Edhayan
OBJECTIVES: Although individual socioeconomic status has been linked with risk of traumatic injury, there has been relatively little research into the question of how economic changes may impact trauma admission rates in neighborhoods with different socioeconomic backgrounds. METHODS: This study pairs ZIP code-level data on trauma admissions with county-level data on unemployment to assess differences in the type of changes experienced in more and less affluent neighborhoods of the Detroit metropolitan area between 2006 and 2014...
March 15, 2018: International Journal of Public Health
Bryce E Hughes
Using a national longitudinal survey data set from the Higher Education Research Institute, this study tested whether students who identified as a sexual minority (for example, lesbian, gay, bisexual, or queer) were more or less likely to persist after 4 years in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) fields, as opposed to switching to a non-STEM program, compared to their heterosexual peers. A multilevel regression model controlling for various experiences and characteristics previously determined to predict retention in STEM demonstrated that, net of these variables, sexual minority students were 8% less likely to be retained in STEM compared to switching into a non-STEM program...
March 2018: Science Advances
Elizabeth A McConnell, Patrick Janulis, Gregory Phillips, Roky Truong, Michelle Birkett
Minority stress theory has widespread research support in explaining health disparities experienced by sexual and gender minorities. However, less is known about how minority stress impacts multiply marginalized groups, such as lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender people of color (LGBT POC). Also, although research has documented resilience in the face of minority stress at the individual level, research is needed that examines macro-level processes such as community resilience (Meyer, 2015). In the current study, we integrate minority stress theory and intersectionality theory to examine multiple minority stress (i...
March 2018: Psychology of Sexual Orientation and Gender Diversity
Inger Sundström-Poromaa
From a psychological perspective, the menstrual cycle has been a research topic for more than 50 years. The most recent menstrual cycle research has been driven by an increased interest in sex differences in neuroscience, and the urge to understand sex disparities in prevalence, clinical presentation, and treatment response in psychiatric or neurologic disorders. Indeed, the menstrual cycle is an excellent model of ovarian steroid influence on emotion, behavior, and cognition. This review summarizes the emotion-related and cognitive findings of methodologically sound menstrual cycle studies...
2018: Vitamins and Hormones
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