keyword
MENU ▼
Read by QxMD icon Read
search

unconscious bias

keyword
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28492707/the-strangest-of-all-encounters-racial-and-ethnic-discrimination-in-us-health-care
#1
Sherman A James
In 2003, a Committee of the Institute of Medicine of the National Academy of Sciences summarized hundreds of studies documenting that US racial minorities, especially African Americans, receive poorer quality health care for a wide variety of conditions than their White counterparts. These racial differences in health care persist after controlling for sociodemographic factors and patients' ability to pay for care. The Committee concluded that physicians' unconscious negative stereotypes of African Americans, and perhaps other people of color, likely contribute to these health care disparities...
May 8, 2017: Cadernos de Saúde Pública
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28472533/a-systematic-review-of-the-impact-of-physician-implicit-racial-bias-on-clinical-decision-making
#2
Erin Dehon, Nicole Weiss, Jonathan Jones, Whitney Faulconer, Elizabeth Hinton, Sarah Sterling
OBJECTIVES: Disparities in diagnosis and treatment of racial minorities exist in the emergency department (ED). A better understanding of how physician implicit (unconscious) bias contributes to these disparities may help identify ways to eliminate such racial disparities. The objective of this systematic review was to examine and summarize the evidence on the association between physician implicit racial bias and clinical decision making. METHODS: Based on PRISMA guidelines, a structured electronic literature search of PubMed, CINAHL, Scopus, and PsycINFO databases was conducted...
May 4, 2017: Academic Emergency Medicine: Official Journal of the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28417507/understanding-the-roots-of-health-inequalities-requires-new-methods
#3
Shawn Walker
It is easy to teach health care professionals and students to follow a guideline, tricky to teach them to become aware of unconscious biases and assumptions which may influence how they execute that guideline. Substandard care may be easily recognised in retrospect, but understanding how and why it continues to happen, to some populations more than others, is key to reducing such disparities. Hypertensive disorders of pregnancy affect women of immigrant populations more often and with worse outcomes than native residents of industrialised countries...
April 17, 2017: BJOG: An International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28408535/unconscious-bias-must-be-tackled-to-reduce-worry-about-overseas-trained-doctors-says-bapio
#4
Abi Rimmer
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
April 13, 2017: BMJ: British Medical Journal
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28401131/perceptions-and-experiences-of-a-gender-gap-at-a-canadian-research-institute-and-potential-strategies-to-mitigate-this-gap-a-sequential-mixed-methods-study
#5
Alekhya Mascarenhas, Julia E Moore, Andrea C Tricco, Jemila Hamid, Caitlin Daly, Julie Bain, Sabrina Jassemi, Tara Kiran, Nancy Baxter, Sharon E Straus
BACKGROUND: The gender gap in academia is long-standing. Failure to ensure that our academic faculty reflect our student pool and national population deprives Canada of talent. We explored the gender distribution and perceptions of the gender gap at a Canadian university-affiliated, hospital-based research institute. METHODS: We completed a sequential mixed-methods study. In phase 1, we used the research institute's registry of scientists (1999-2014) and estimated overall prevalence of a gender gap and the gap with respect to job description (e...
January 2017: CMAJ Open
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28342029/self-awareness-and-cultural-identity-as-an-effort-to-reduce-bias-in-medicine
#6
Augustus A White, Heather J Logghe, Dan A Goodenough, Linda L Barnes, Anne Hallward, Irving M Allen, David W Green, Edward Krupat, Roxana Llerena-Quinn
In response to persistently documented health disparities based on race and other demographic factors, medical schools have implemented "cultural competency" coursework. While many of these courses have focused on strategies for treating patients of different cultural backgrounds, very few have addressed the impact of the physician's own cultural background and offered methods to overcome his or her own unconscious biases. In hopes of training physicians to contextualize the impact of their own cultural background on their ability to provide optimal patient care, the authors created a 14-session course on culture, self-reflection, and medicine...
March 24, 2017: Journal of Racial and Ethnic Health Disparities
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28341310/women-in-leadership-why-so-few-and%C3%A2-what-to-do-about-it
#7
Christina M Surawicz
The numbers of women in medical school and in medical training have increased dramatically and are near 50% overall, but the number of women who advance to senior and leadership positions is not nearly this high. There are many reasons why the number of women in leadership roles in academic medicine has not kept pace with the number of women entering the field of medicine. Two popular themes are the glass ceiling (referring to an invisible barrier to advancement) and the leaky pipeline (the loss of women faculty along the path, or pipeline, to advancement)...
December 2016: Journal of the American College of Radiology: JACR
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28326119/comparing-the-self-report-and-measured-smartphone-usage-of-college-students-a-pilot-study
#8
Heyoung Lee, Heejune Ahn, Trung Giang Nguyen, Sam-Wook Choi, Dae Jin Kim
OBJECTIVE: Nowadays smartphone overuse has become a social and medical concern. For the diagnosis and treatment, clinicians use the self-report information, but the report data often does not match actual usage pattern. The paper examines the similarity and variance in smartphone usage patterns between the measured data and self-reported data. METHODS: Together with the self-reported data, the real usage log data is collected from 35 college students in a metropolitan region of Northeast Asia, using Android smartphone monitoring application developed by the authors...
March 2017: Psychiatry Investigation
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28284674/the-cost-of-unconscious-bias-and-pattern%C3%A2-recognition
#9
Jenny Abramson, Elliot K Fishman, Karen M Horton, Sheila Sheth
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
March 8, 2017: Journal of the American College of Radiology: JACR
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28276847/individual-interpersonal-and-organisational-factors-of-healthcare-conflict-a-scoping-review
#10
Sara Kim, Naike Bochatay, Annemarie Relyea-Chew, Elizabeth Buttrick, Chris Amdahl, Laura Kim, Elise Frans, Matthew Mossanen, Azhar Khandekar, Ryan Fehr, Young-Mee Lee
Unresolved conflicts among healthcare professionals can lead to difficult patient care consequences. This scoping review examines the current healthcare literature that reported sources and consequences of conflict associated with individual, interpersonal, and organisational factors. We identified 99 articles published between 2001 and 2015 from PubMed, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, and Excerpta Medical Database. Most reviewed studies relied on healthcare professionals' perceptions and beliefs associated with conflict sources and consequences, with few studies reporting behavioural or organisational change outcomes...
May 2017: Journal of Interprofessional Care
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28276461/paired-synchronous-rhythmic-finger-tapping-without-an-external-timing-cue-shows-greater-speed-increases-relative-to-those-for-solo-tapping
#11
Masahiro Okano, Masahiro Shinya, Kazutoshi Kudo
In solo synchronization-continuation (SC) tasks, intertap intervals (ITI) are known to drift from the initial tempo. It has been demonstrated that people in paired and group contexts modulate their action timing unconsciously in various situations such as choice reaction tasks, rhythmic body sway, and hand clapping in concerts, which suggests the possibility that ITI drift is also affected by paired context. We conducted solo and paired SC tapping experiments with three tempos (75, 120, and 200 bpm) and examined whether tempo-keeping performance changed according to tempo and/or the number of players...
March 9, 2017: Scientific Reports
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28272112/starting-with-lucy-focusing-on-human-similarities-rather-than-differences-to-address-health-care-disparities
#12
Laura Clementz, Megan McNamara, Nicole M Burt, Matthew Sparks, Mamta K Singh
PROBLEM: Multicultural or cultural competence education to address health care disparities using the traditional categorical approach can lead to inadvertent adverse consequences. Nontraditional approaches that address these drawbacks while promoting humanistic care are needed. APPROACH: In September 2014, the Cleveland VA Medical Center's Center of Excellence in Primary Care Education Transforming Outpatient Care (CoEPCE-TOPC) collaborated with the Cleveland Museum of Natural History (CMNH) to develop the Original Identity program, which uses a biocultural anthropologic framework to help learners recognize and address unconscious bias and starts with a discussion of humans' shared origins...
March 7, 2017: Academic Medicine: Journal of the Association of American Medical Colleges
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28270395/leaky-pipeline-gender-bias-self-selection-or-all-three-a-quantitative-analysis-of-gender-balance-at-an-international-palliative-care-research-conference
#13
Katherine E Sleeman, Jonathan Koffman, Irene J Higginson
OBJECTIVES: The 'leaky pipeline' in academia is a clearly described phenomenon, but has not been examined in palliative care. We analysed the gender balance of speakers at the 9th World Research Congress of the European Association of Palliative Care (EAPC) to test the null hypothesis that there is no difference in the proportion of women and men with senior academic visibility in palliative care conference programmes. METHODS: The final programme of the 2016 EAPC World Congress was examined, and the gender of each speaker was recorded...
March 7, 2017: BMJ Supportive & Palliative Care
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28267223/fundal-pressure-during-the-second-stage-of-labour
#14
REVIEW
G Justus Hofmeyr, Joshua P Vogel, Anna Cuthbert, Mandisa Singata
BACKGROUND: Fundal pressure during the second stage of labour (also known as the 'Kristeller manoeuvre') involves application of manual pressure to the uppermost part of the uterus directed towards the birth canal, in an attempt to assist spontaneous vaginal birth and avoid prolonged second stage or the need for operative birth. Fundal pressure has also been applied using an inflatable belt. Fundal pressure is widely used, however methods of its use vary widely. Despite strongly held opinions in favour of and against the use of fundal pressure, there is limited evidence regarding its maternal and neonatal benefits and harms...
March 7, 2017: Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28261126/is-the-achievement-motive-gender-biased-the-validity-of-tat-pse-in-women-and-men
#15
Nicole Gruber
In picture story exercises like the Thematic Apperception Test (TAT; Heckhausen, 1963), different pictures are presented to a person with the instruction to create a story using the scenes portrayed in the image. It is assumed, that people identify themselves with the people in the images and project their unconscious motives (e.g., achievement motive) onto them. As the TAT shows only men in the pictures, critics claimed the test is gender-biased; assuming women cannot identify with men in pictures. However, it was not assessed, whether female protagonists of the picture really trigger the same achievement motive as men...
2017: Frontiers in Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28238984/race-racism-and-access-to-renal-transplantation-among-african-americans
#16
Kimberly Jacob Arriola
There are clear and compelling racial disparities in access to renal transplant, which is the therapy of choice for many patients with end stage renal disease. This paper conceptualizes the role of racism (i.e., internalized, personally-mediated, and institutionalized) in creating and perpetuating these disparities at multiple levels of the social ecology by integrating two often-cited theories in the literature. Internalized racism is manifested at the intrapersonal level when, for example, African American patients devalue their self-worth, thereby not pursuing the most aggressive treatment available...
2017: Journal of Health Care for the Poor and Underserved
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28197110/interplay-between-narrative-and-bodily-self-in-access-to-consciousness-no-difference-between-self-and-non-self-attributes
#17
Jean-Paul Noel, Olaf Blanke, Andrea Serino, Roy Salomon
The construct of the "self" is conceived as being fundamental in promoting survival. As such, extensive studies have documented preferential processing of self-relevant stimuli. For example, attributes that relate to the self are better encoded and retrieved, and are more readily consciously perceived. The preferential processing of self-relevant information, however, appears to be especially true for physical (e.g., faces), as opposed to psychological (e.g., traits), conceptions of the self. Here, we test whether semantic attributes that participants judge as self-relevant are further processed unconsciously than attributes that were not judged as self-relevant...
2017: Frontiers in Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28194690/impact-of-pregnancy-and-gender-on-internal-medicine-resident-evaluations-a-retrospective-cohort-study
#18
Megan L Krause, Muhamad Y Elrashidi, Andrew J Halvorsen, Furman S McDonald, Amy S Oxentenko
BACKGROUND: Pregnancy and its impact on graduate medical training are not well understood. OBJECTIVE: To examine the effect of gender and pregnancy for Internal Medicine (IM) residents on evaluations by peers and faculty. DESIGN: This was a retrospective cohort study. SUBJECTS: All IM residents in training from July 1, 2004-June 30, 2014, were included. Female residents who experienced pregnancy and male residents whose partners experienced pregnancy during training were identified using an existing administrative database...
February 13, 2017: Journal of General Internal Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28181992/women-prefer-men-who-use-metaphorical-language-when-paying-compliments-in-a-romantic-context
#19
Zhao Gao, Shan Gao, Lei Xu, Xiaoxiao Zheng, Xiaole Ma, Lizhu Luo, Keith M Kendrick
Language plays an important role in romantic attachment. However, it is unclear whether the structure and topic of language use might influence potential mate choice. We investigated 124 female students' preference for compliments paid by males incorporating either literal or metaphoric (conventional/novel) language and targeting their appearance or possessions (house) throughout their menstrual cycle. Male faces paired with novel metaphorical compliments were rated as more attractive by women than those paired with literal ones...
February 9, 2017: Scientific Reports
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28116810/can-implicit-associations-distinguish-true-and-false-eyewitness-memory-development-and-preliminary-testing-of-the-iate
#20
RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL
Rebecca K Helm, Stephen J Ceci, Kayla A Burd
Eyewitness identification has been shown to be fallible and prone to false memory. In this study we develop and test a new method to probe the mechanisms involved in the formation of false memories in this area, and determine whether a particular memory is likely to be true or false. We created a seven-step procedure based on the Implicit Association Test to gauge implicit biases in eyewitness identification (the IATe). We show that identification errors may result from unconscious bias caused by implicit associations evoked by a given face...
November 2016: Behavioral Sciences & the Law
keyword
keyword
63785
1
2
Fetch more papers »
Fetching more papers... Fetching...
Read by QxMD. Sign in or create an account to discover new knowledge that matter to you.
Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read
×

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"