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Depression primary care

Patrick C Kennedy, Helen Purtill, Kieran O'Sullivan
BACKGROUND: Many patients reporting musculoskeletal pain present to Primary Care Physiotherapy with costly comorbid overlapping complaints that remain medically unexplained. These subjective health complaints (SHC) incorporate coexisting multi-site musculoskeletal pain and varied non-musculoskeletal complaints (e.g. anxiety, tiredness). The role of these non-musculoskeletal complaints is acknowledged in spinal musculoskeletal disorders, but less so for peripheral musculoskeletal disorders...
March 8, 2018: Musculoskeletal Science & Practice
Amy Mulick, Jane Walker, Stephen Puntis, Katy Burke, Stefan Symeonides, Charlie Gourley, Marta Wanat, Chris Frost, Michael Sharpe
BACKGROUND: Comorbid major depression has been associated with worse survival in patients with cancer. However, we do not know if treating depression improves survival. In the SMaRT Oncology-2 (good prognosis cancers) and SMaRT Oncology-3 (lung cancer, a poor prognosis cancer) trials, we found that a depression treatment programme, Depression Care for People with Cancer (DCPC), was effective in reducing comorbid major depression. In this analysis, we aimed to identify whether DCPC also had an effect on survival...
March 12, 2018: Lancet Psychiatry
M Karjalainen, J Saltevo, M Tiihonen, M Haanpää, H Kautiainen, P Mäntyselkä
BACKGROUND: The association between pain and diabetes in older people has been largely unexplored. The aim of this survey was to analyze the prevalence and characteristics of pain among Finnish men and women 65 or older with and without diabetes in primary care. METHODS: All home-dwelling persons 65 years or older with diabetes (N = 527) and age and gender matched controls (N = 890) were identified from electronic patient records. Frequent pain was regarded as any pain experienced more often than once a week, and it was divided into pain experienced several times a week but not daily and pain experienced daily or continuously...
March 15, 2018: BMC Geriatrics
M Austin Coker, Carrie E Huisingh, Gerald McGwin, Russell W Read, Mark W Swanson, Laura E Dreer, Dawn K DeCarlo, Lindsay Gregg, Cynthia Owsley
Importance: The prevalence of irreversible vision impairment in the United States is expected to increase by 2050. Vision rehabilitation is the primary treatment option. Clinical trials have established its efficacy in improving quality of life. Yet studies indicate that patients experience many barriers to accessing low-vision care. Objectives: To examine the rate of referral for low-vision rehabilitation services by resident and attending ophthalmologists for adults with irreversible vision impairment and to assess the knowledge, attitudes, and beliefs of patients about vision rehabilitation...
March 15, 2018: JAMA Ophthalmology
Fred Stephen Sarfo, Osei Sarfo-Kantanka, Sheila Adamu, Vida Obese, Jennifer Voeks, Raelle Tagge, Vipin Sethi, Bruce Ovbiagele
BACKGROUND: There is an unprecedented rise in the prevalence of stroke in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA). Secondary prevention guidelines recommend that antihypertensive, statin and antiplatelet therapy be initiated promptly after ischemic stroke and adhered to in a persistent fashion to achieve optimal vascular-risk reduction. However, these goals are seldom realized in routine clinical care settings in SSA due to logistical challenges. We seek to assess whether a polypill containing fixed doses of three antihypertensive agents, a statin and antiplatelet therapy taken once daily per os for 12 months among recent stroke survivors would result in carotid intimal thickness regression compared with usual care (UC)...
March 14, 2018: Trials
Gin S Malhi, Tim Outhred, Grace Morris, Philip M Boyce, Richard Bryant, Paul B Fitzgerald, Malcolm J Hopwood, Bill Lyndon, Roger Mulder, Greg Murray, Richard J Porter, Ajeet B Singh, Kristina Fritz
In December 2015, the Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists published a comprehensive set of mood disorder clinical practice guidelines for psychiatrists, psychologists and mental health professionals. This guideline summary, directed broadly at primary care physicians, is an abridged version that focuses on bipolar disorder. It is intended as an aid to the management of this complex disorder for primary care physicians working in collaboration with psychiatrists to implement successful long term management...
March 19, 2018: Medical Journal of Australia
Daisy Oliveira Costa, Fabíola Isabel Suano de Souza, Glaura César Pedroso, Maria Wany Louzada Strufaldi
This study aimed to determine the presence and association of possible mental disorders diagnoses in primary care pregnant women and newborns' conditions. This is a longitudinal study with pregnant women (18-39 years), in the second and third trimesters of pregnancy, attended at primary care facilities in the metropolitan region of São Paulo (February to August/2014). The following tools were used: sociodemographic questionnaire; Mental Disorders in Primary Care Assessment tool; and an interview with information and mother´s perception of the behavior of newborns...
March 2018: Ciência & Saúde Coletiva
Nancy Byatt, Lucille Cox, Tiffany A Moore Simas, Nisha Kini, Kathleen Biebel, Padma Sankaran, Holly A Swartz, Linda Weinreb
To elucidate (1) the challenges associated with under-recognition of bipolar disorder in obstetric settings, (2) barriers pregnant and postpartum women with bipolar disorder face when trying to access psychiatric care, and (3) how obstetric settings can identify such women and connect them with mental health services. Structured, in-depth interviews were conducted with 25 pregnant and postpartum women recruited from obstetric practices who scored ≥ 10 on the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale and met DSM-IV criteria for bipolar disorder I, II, or not otherwise specified using the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview...
March 13, 2018: Archives of Women's Mental Health
Isabelle Dibu Mulango, Julius Atashili, Bradley N Gaynes, Tsi Njim
BACKGROUND: Mental health and mental illness are often overlooked in the management of patients in our health services. Depression is a common mental disorder worldwide. Recognising and managing mental illnesses such as depression by primary health care providers (PHCPs) is crucial. This study describes the knowledge, attitudes and practices (KAP) of PHCPs regarding depression in Fako Division. METHODS: A cross-sectional study was conducted among PHCPs (general practitioners, nurses, pharmacy attendants and social workers) in public-owned health facilities in the four health districts in Fako Division...
March 13, 2018: BMC Psychiatry
Adam Martin, Rupert Payne, Edward Cf Wilson
BACKGROUND: The National Health Service (NHS) in England spends over £9 billion on prescription medicines dispensed in primary care, of which over two-thirds is accounted for by repeat prescriptions. Recently, GPs in England have been urged to limit the duration of repeat prescriptions, where clinically appropriate, to 28 days to reduce wastage and hence contain costs. However, shorter prescriptions will increase transaction costs and thus may not be cost saving. Furthermore, there is evidence to suggest that shorter prescriptions are associated with lower adherence, which would be expected to lead to lower clinical benefit...
March 12, 2018: Applied Health Economics and Health Policy
Samuel Y S Wong, Yu Ying Sun, Aaroy T Y Chan, Maria K W Leung, David V K Chao, Carole C K Li, King K H Chan, Wai Kwong Tang, Trevor Mazzucchelli, Alma M L Au, Benjamin H K Yip
PURPOSE: We undertook a randomized controlled trial to assess the efficacy of group-based behavioral activation with mindfulness (BAM) for treating subthreshold depression in primary care in Hong Kong. METHODS: We recruited adult patients aged 18 years or older with subthreshold depression from public primary care clinics and randomly assigned them to a BAM intervention group or a usual care group. The BAM group was provided with eight 2-hour weekly BAM sessions by trained allied health care workers...
March 2018: Annals of Family Medicine
Anna Cassell, Duncan Edwards, Amelia Harshfield, Kirsty Rhodes, James Brimicombe, Rupert Payne, Simon Griffin
BACKGROUND: Multimorbidity places a substantial burden on patients and the healthcare system, but few contemporary epidemiological data are available. AIM: To describe the epidemiology of multimorbidity in adults in England, and quantify associations between multimorbidity and health service utilisation. DESIGN AND SETTING: Retrospective cohort study, undertaken in England. METHOD: The study used a random sample of 403 985 adult patients (aged ≥18 years), who were registered with a general practice on 1 January 2012 and included in the Clinical Practice Research Datalink...
March 12, 2018: British Journal of General Practice: the Journal of the Royal College of General Practitioners
Y Y Lee, E A Stockings, M G Harris, S A R Doi, I S Page, S K Davidson, J J Barendregt
BACKGROUND: Studies have consistently shown that subthreshold depression is associated with an increased risk of developing major depression. However, no study has yet calculated a pooled estimate that quantifies the magnitude of this risk across multiple studies. METHODS: We conducted a systematic review to identify longitudinal cohort studies containing data on the association between subthreshold depression and future major depression. A baseline meta-analysis was conducted using the inverse variance heterogeneity method to calculate the incidence rate ratio (IRR) of major depression among people with subthreshold depression relative to non-depressed controls...
March 13, 2018: Psychological Medicine
Suzanne Jolley, Elizabeth Kuipers, Catherine Stewart, Sophie Browning, Karen Bracegirdle, Nedah Basit, Kimberley Gin, Colette Hirsch, Richard Corrigall, Partha Banerjea, Grainne Turley, Daniel Stahl, Kristin R Laurens
OBJECTIVES: Health care guidelines recommend psychological interventions for childhood unusual experiences that are associated with distress or adverse functional impact (UEDs), based on adult, rather than child-specific, evidence. We report the first randomized controlled evaluation of the acceptability and potential clinical utility of cognitive behavioural therapy for childhood UEDs (CBT-UED). DESIGN: Pilot randomized controlled trial. METHODS: Participants aged 8-14 years were recruited from referrals to community services for children with emotional/behavioural problems and screened for self-reported UEDs...
March 12, 2018: British Journal of Clinical Psychology
Federica Picariello, Rona Moss-Morris, Iain C Macdougall, Sam Norton, Maria Da Silva-Gane, Ken Farrington, Hope Clayton, Joseph Chilcot
INTRODUCTION: Fatigue is one of the most common and disabling symptoms in end-stage kidney disease, particularly among in-centre haemodialysis patients. This two-arm parallel group feasibility randomised controlled trial will determine whether a fully powered efficacy trial is achievable by examining the feasibility of recruitment, acceptability and potential benefits of a cognitive-behavioural therapy (CBT)-based intervention for fatigue among in-centre haemodialysis patients. METHODS: We aim to recruit 40 adult patients undergoing in-centre haemodialysis at secondary care outpatient dialysis units, who meet clinical levels of fatigue...
March 8, 2018: BMJ Open
Megan Rose Stafford, Mick Cooper, Michael Barkham, Jeni Beecham, Peter Bower, Karen Cromarty, Andrew J B Fugard, Charlie Jackson, Peter Pearce, Rebekah Ryder, Cathy Street
BACKGROUND: One in ten children in Britain have been identified as experiencing a diagnosable mental health disorder. School-based humanistic counselling (SBHC) may help young people identify, address, and overcome psychological distress. Data from four pilot trials suggest that SBHC may be clinically effective. However, a fully powered randomised controlled trial (RCT) is needed to provide a robust test of its effectiveness, to assess its cost-effectiveness, and to determine the process of change...
March 9, 2018: Trials
Sarah K Ruiz, Susan J Harris, Pedro Martinez, Philip M Gold, Bonnie Klimes-Dougan
BACKGROUND: The quality of our early attachment relationships with primary caregivers is carried forward to new developmental domains, including interpersonal contexts in adulthood. One of the factors that can disrupt early attachment is maternal depression, which may be associated with less responsive care and may impede the development of a secure attachment. Moreover, this disruption in secure attachment may act as a mechanism by which offspring of depressed mothers are more likely to experience their own psychopathology...
January 9, 2018: Journal of Affective Disorders
Fredrika Norlund, Emma Wallin, Erik Martin Gustaf Olsson, John Wallert, Gunilla Burell, Louise von Essen, Claes Held
BACKGROUND: Symptoms of depression and anxiety are common after a myocardial infarction (MI). Internet-based cognitive behavioral therapy (iCBT) has shown good results in other patient groups. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of an iCBT treatment to reduce self-reported symptoms of depression and anxiety among patients with a recent MI. METHODS: In total, 3928 patients were screened for eligibility in 25 Swedish hospitals...
March 8, 2018: Journal of Medical Internet Research
Heather Burroughs, Bernadette Bartlam, Mo Ray, Tom Kingstone, Tom Shepherd, Reuben Ogollah, Janine Proctor, Waquas Waheed, Peter Bower, Peter Bullock, Karina Lovell, Simon Gilbody, Della Bailey, Stephanie Butler-Whalley, Carolyn Chew-Graham
BACKGROUND: Anxiety and depression are common among older people, with up to 20% reporting such symptoms, and the prevalence increases with co-morbid chronic physical health problems. Access to treatment for anxiety and depression in this population is poor due to a combination of factors at the level of patient, practitioner and healthcare system. There is evidence to suggest that older people with anxiety and/or depression may benefit both from one-to-one interventions and group social or educational activities, which reduce loneliness, are participatory and offer some activity...
March 7, 2018: Trials
Carol Coupland, Trevor Hill, Richard Morriss, Michael Moore, Antony Arthur, Julia Hippisley-Cox
BACKGROUND: Antidepressants are one of the most commonly prescribed medications in young and middle-aged adults, but there is relatively little information on their safety across a range of adverse outcomes in this age group. This study aimed to assess associations between antidepressant treatment and several adverse outcomes in people aged 20-64 years diagnosed with depression. METHODS: We conducted a cohort study in 238,963 patients aged 20-64 years registered with practices across the UK contributing to the QResearch primary care database...
March 8, 2018: BMC Medicine
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