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sleep memory

Monika Schönauer, Svenja Brodt, Dorothee Pöhlchen, Anja Breßmer, Amory H Danek, Steffen Gais
During creative problem solving, initial solution attempts often fail because of self-imposed constraints that prevent us from thinking out of the box . In order to solve a problem successfully, the problem representation has to be restructured by combining elements of available knowledge in novel and creative ways. It has been suggested that sleep supports the reorganization of memory representations, ultimately aiding problem solving. In this study, we systematically tested the effect of sleep and time on problem solving, using classical insight tasks and magic tricks...
2018: Frontiers in Human Neuroscience
Marie E Gaine, Snehajyoti Chatterjee, Ted Abel
Sleep deprivation disrupts the lives of millions of people every day and has a profound impact on the molecular biology of the brain. These effects begin as changes within a neuron, at the DNA and RNA level, and result in alterations in neuronal plasticity and dysregulation of many cognitive functions including learning and memory. The epigenome plays a critical role in regulating gene expression in the context of memory storage. In this review article, we begin by describing the effects of epigenetic alterations on the regulation of gene expression, focusing on the most common epigenetic mechanisms: (i) DNA methylation; (ii) histone modifications; and (iii) non-coding RNAs...
2018: Frontiers in Neural Circuits
Anastasia Greenberg, Javad Karimi Abadchi, Clayton T Dickson, Majid H Mohajerani
The signature rhythm of slow-wave forebrain activity is the large amplitude, slow oscillation (SO: ∼1 Hz) made up of alternating synchronous periods of activity and silence at the single cell and network levels. On each wave, the SO originates at a unique location and propagates across the neocortex. Attempts to manipulate SO activity using electrical fields have been shown to entrain cortical networks and enhance memory performance. However, neural activity during this manipulation has remained elusive due to methodological issues in typical electrical recordings...
March 10, 2018: NeuroImage
Ruth L F Leong, Shirley Y J Koh, Jesisca Tandi, Michael W L Chee, June C Lo
Prospective memory is defined as remembering to do something at a particular moment in the future and may be modulated by sleep. Here, we investigated whether multiple nights of partial sleep deprivation would affect the successful retrieval of intentions. Fifty-nine adolescents (mean age ± SD: 16.1 ± 0.6 years) were instructed to remember to press specific keys in response to the target words presented during a semantic categorization task in the future. Their memory was tested after five nights of either 5-h (sleep restriction group) or 9-h time-in-bed (control group)...
April 2018: Sleep Medicine
William D S Killgore, Haley C Kent, Sara A Knight, Anna Alkozei
Humans demonstrate a circadian rhythm of melatonin production that closely tracks the daily light/dark cycle, with profound increases in circulating levels during the night-time and nearly nonexistent levels during daylight hours. Although melatonin is known to play a role in preparing the brain and body for sleep, its effects on cognition and brain function are not well understood. We hypothesized that declines in morning melatonin would be associated with increased functional activation within cortical regions involved in alertness, attention, and executive function...
March 9, 2018: Neuroreport
Scott A Cairney, Anna Á Váli Guttesen, Nicole El Marj, Bernhard P Staresina
How are brief encounters transformed into lasting memories? Previous research has established the role of non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep, along with its electrophysiological signatures of slow oscillations (SOs) and spindles, for memory consolidation [1-4]. In related work, experimental manipulations have demonstrated that NREM sleep provides a window of opportunity to selectively strengthen particular memory traces via the delivery of auditory cues [5-10], a procedure known as targeted memory reactivation (TMR)...
March 2, 2018: Current Biology: CB
Jocelyn Breton, Edwin M Robertson
Our brains are constantly processing past events [1]. These off-line processes consolidate memories, leading in the case of motor skill memories to an enhancement in performance between training sessions. A similar magnitude of enhancement develops over a night of sleep following an implicit task, when a sequence of movements is acquired unintentionally, or following an explicit task, when the same sequence is acquired intentionally [2]. What remains poorly understood, however, is whether these similar offline improvements are supported by similar circuits, or through distinct circuits...
June 2017: Nature Human Behaviour
Dasha Fuentes, Nidia Fernández, Yenela García, Teidy García, Ana Ruth Morales, Roberto Menéndez
The knockout mouse model, B6.129P2-Apoetm1Unc is homozygotic for the Apolipoprotein E (ApoE) deletion; thus, it is capable of developing hyperlipidemia and atherosclerosis but ApoE is also a lipid-transport protein abundantly expressed in most neurons in the central nervous system, so these animals could also be models of neurodegenerative diseases. The aim of this study was to determine age-related changes in spontaneous behavior and in learning and memory of Apolipoprotein E knockout mice. Spontaneous behavioral measurements included sleeping pattern, motor coordination and balance by rotarod and open field activity, whereas learning and memory tests included forced alternation in Y-maze, novel object recognition and passive avoidance conditioning...
March 3, 2018: Behavioral Sciences
Sheldon H Preskorn
This column is the fifth in a series examining the advances being made in central nervous system drug development because of advances in molecular pharmacology and an improved understanding of the neurobiology underlying disturbances in brain function including psychiatric illnesses. This column covers the special animal and human studies conducted as part of the development of suvorexant, which is the first in the class of dual orexin 1 and 2 receptor antagonists to be approved; it has an indication for the treatment of disturbances in sleep onset and maintenance...
March 2018: Journal of Psychiatric Practice
Miranda Occhionero, Piercarla Cicogna, Maria Jose Esposito
The aim of the present study was to deepen knowledge about the effect of a lowered vigilance state on time-based prospective memory (TBPM) performance. For this purpose 2 TBPM tasks (primary and interpolated), which shared a portion of the retention interval, and 3 reasoning tasks, as ongoing activities, were administered after total sleep deprivation and in a regular sleep condition. The results showed a detrimental effect of sleep deprivation on prospective memory performance and a partial dissociation between clock-checking behavior and time estimation for prospective compliance...
April 2017: American Journal of Psychology
Daniel C McFarland, Kelly M Shaffer, Heather Polizzi, John Mascarenhas, Marina Kremyanskaya, Jimmie Holland, Ronald Hoffman
BACKGROUND: The physical symptom burden of patients with myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs) may last for extended periods during their disease trajectories and lead to psychologic distress, anxiety, or depression or all of these. OBJECTIVE: This study evaluated the relationship between physical symptom burden captured by the Physical Problem List (PPL) on the Distress Thermometer and Problem List and psychologic outcomes (distress, anxiety, and depression) in the MPN setting...
January 31, 2018: Psychosomatics
Laurie L Wellman, Mairen E Fitzpatrick, Amy M Sutton, Brook L Williams, Mayumi Machida, Larry D Sanford
The basolateral nucleus of the amygdala (BLA) plays a significant role in mediating individual differences in the effects of fear memory on sleep. Here, we assessed the effects of antagonizing corticotropin releasing factor receptor 1 (CRFR1) after shock training (ST) on fear-conditioned behaviors and sleep. Outbred Wistar rats were surgically implanted with electrodes for recording EEG and EMG and with bilateral guide cannulae directed at BLA. Data loggers were placed intraperitoneally to record core body temperature...
March 1, 2018: Hormones and Behavior
Adrian Svingos, Sarah Greif, Brittany Bailey, Shelley Heaton
Children with conditions affecting cognitive processes experience high levels of sleep disturbance, which may further compound the cognitive ramifications of their disorders. Despite this, existing studies in this area have been primarily confined to only particular diagnostic groups and/or a limited scope of sleep and cognitive parameters. The current study characterized the nature of sleep problems and examined the relationship between a wide range of sleep-related problems and cognitive functioning in a large ( N = 103) diagnostically heterogeneous sample of youth (aged 6-16) referred for neuropsychological assessment...
February 28, 2018: Children
Susanna Mantovani, Simon S Smith, Richard Gordon, John D O'Sullivan
Sleep and circadian alterations are amongst the very first symptoms experienced in Parkinson's disease, and sleep alterations are present in the majority of patients with overt clinical manifestation of Parkinson's disease. However, the magnitude of sleep and circadian dysfunction in Parkinson's disease, and its influence on the pathophysiology of Parkinson's disease remains often unclear and a matter of debate. In particular, the confounding influences of dopaminergic therapy on sleep and circadian dysfunction are a major challenge, and need to be more carefully addressed in clinical studies...
March 1, 2018: Journal of Sleep Research
Lone Baandrup, Julie A E Christensen, Birgitte Fagerlund, Poul Jennum
Neurocognitive impairment is a trait marker of schizophrenia, but no effective treatment has yet been identified. Sleep spindle deficits have been associated with diminished sleep-dependent memory learning. We examined whether this link could be extended into various cognitive domains by investigating the association of a neurocognitive test battery (the Brief Assessment of Cognition in Schizophrenia) with sleep spindle activity and morphology. We examined 37 outpatients diagnosed with schizophrenia and medicated with both antipsychotics and benzodiazepines...
March 1, 2018: Journal of Sleep Research
Damien Léger, Eden Debellemaniere, Arnaud Rabat, Virginie Bayon, Karim Benchenane, Mounir Chennaoui
In recent decades, increasing evidence has positioned slow-wave sleep (SWS) as a major actor in neurophysiological phenomena such as glucose metabolism, hormone release, immunity and memory. This proposed role for SWS, coupled with observations of impaired SWS in several pathologies as well as in aging, has led some researchers to implement methods that could specifically enhance SWS. This review aims to gather the current knowledge extending from the cell to the clinic, in order to construct an overview of what is currently known about so-called SWS...
February 5, 2018: Sleep Medicine Reviews
Keisuke Takano, Louise Vanden Poel, Filip Raes
BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Cognitive bias to sleep-related information is thought to be a core feature of sleep disturbances. The bias may enhance pre-sleep arousal, such as excessive worry about sleeplessness, which prevents people from initiating normal sleep onset. The present study focused on (a) attention bias toward sleep-related stimuli and (b) difficulty in updating working memory for sleep-related stimuli as two possible mechanisms underlying pre-sleep cognitive arousal. METHOD: Participants (n = 61, a community sample) completed a dot-probe task (with sleep-related and matched control word stimuli) and a 1-back and 2-back task (with sleep-related and non-sleep-related pictorial stimuli)...
February 21, 2018: Journal of Behavior Therapy and Experimental Psychiatry
Katherine G Akers, Yoan Chérasse, Yuki Fujita, Sakthivel Srinivasan, Takeshi Sakurai, Masanori Sakaguchi
Neural stem and progenitor cells continue to generate new neurons in particular regions of the brain during adulthood. One of these neurogenic regions is the dentate gyrus (DG) of the hippocampus, which plays an important role in cognition and emotion. By exploiting this innate neuronal regeneration mechanism in the DG, new technologies have the potential to promote resistance to or recovery from brain dysfunction or degeneration. However, a deeper understanding of how adult DG neurogenesis is regulated by factors such as sleep and epigenetic modifications of gene expression could lead to further breakthroughs in the clinical application of neural stem and progenitor cells...
February 27, 2018: Stem Cells
Pablo E Brockmann, Felipe Damiani, Eduardo Pincheira, Francisca Daiber, Sergio Ruiz, Francisco Aboitiz, Raffaele Ferri, Oliviero Bruni
STUDY OBJECTIVES: To assess spindle activity as possible markers for neurocognitive consequences in children with mild obstructive sleep apnea. METHODS: Children aged 6-11 years diagnosed with mild OSA (i.e., an apnea hypopnea index <5.0) were recruited and compared with age and gender-matched healthy controls. Polysomnographic recordings were analyzed for sleep microstructure and spindle activity. All children completed also an intelligence test battery (i.e...
February 9, 2018: European Journal of Paediatric Neurology: EJPN
Ping Chai Koo, Matthias Moelle, Lisa Marshall
Despite many reports on beneficial effects of anodal slow oscillatory-transcranial direct current stimulation (so-tDCS) during non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep on memory consolidation, frequent negative outcomes have also been observed. Our working hypothesis is that so-tDCS efficacy is strongly dependent upon the susceptibility of the underlying network. One component determining susceptibility of the network is hypothesized to be reflected in learning or 'task-induced' plastic changes. Another component is hypothesized to represent inter-individual confounds...
February 24, 2018: European Journal of Neuroscience
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