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sleep memory

Youngsin Jung, Erik K St Louis
REM sleep behavior disorder (RBD) is a common parasomnia disorder affecting between 1 and 7 % of community-dwelling adults, most frequently older adults. RBD is characterized by nocturnal complex motor behavior and polysomnographic REM sleep without atonia. RBD is strongly associated with synucleinopathy neurodegeneration. The approach to RBD management is currently twofold: symptomatic treatment to prevent injury and prognostic counseling and longitudinal follow-up surveillance for phenoconversion toward overt neurodegenerative disorders...
November 2016: Current Treatment Options in Neurology
Fei-Chi Chuang, Li-Ching Chu, Fu-Tsai Kung, Kuan-Hui Huang
OBJECTIVE: To validate the traditional Chinese translated version of the prolapse quality of life questionnaire (P-QOL). MATERIALS AND METHODS: The P-QOL questionnaire was translated into traditional Chinese characters and administered to women recruited from gynecologic outpatient clinics of Kaohsiung Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Kaohsiung, Taiwan. After the test-retest reliability and internal consistency were established in a pilot study, all participants completed the P-QOL questionnaire and were examined in the lithotomy position using the Pelvic Organ Prolapse Quantification System (POP-Q)...
October 2016: Taiwanese Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology
Birgit Kleim, Julia Wysokowsky, Nuria Schmid, Erich Seifritz, Björn Rasch
STUDY OBJECTIVE: To investigate sleep's effect in the immediate aftermath of experiencing an analog trauma in the laboratory on reducing intrusive emotional memory formation. METHODS: Sixty-five healthy women were exposed to an experimental laboratory trauma. They viewed a neutral and a trauma film in the laboratory and were randomly allocated to either a group that slept following film viewing or a group that remained awake. Sleep was recorded with electroencephalogram in a subgroup of participants in the sleep group...
October 10, 2016: Sleep
Nicolas Fraize, Julien Carponcy, Mickaël Antoine Joseph, Jean-Christophe Comte, Pierre-Hervé Luppi, Paul-Antoine Libourel, Paul-Antoine Salin, Gaël Malleret, Régis Parmentier
STUDY OBJECTIVES: It is commonly accepted that sleep is beneficial to memory processes, but it is still unclear if this benefit originates from improved memory consolidation or enhanced information processing. It has thus been proposed that sleep may also promote forgetting of undesirable and non-essential memories, a process required for optimization of cognitive resources. We tested the hypothesis that non-rapid eye movement sleep (NREMS) promotes forgetting of irrelevant information, more specifically when processing information in working memory (WM), while REM sleep (REMS) facilitates the consolidation of important information...
October 10, 2016: Sleep
Harini C Krishnan, Catherine E Gandour, Joshua L Ramos, Mariah C Wrinkle, Joseph J Sanchez-Pacheco, Lisa C Lyons
STUDY OBJECTIVE: Insufficient sleep in individuals appears increasingly common due to the demands of modern work schedules and technology use. Consequently, there is a growing need to understand the interactions between sleep deprivation and memory. The current study determined the effects of acute sleep deprivation on short- and long-term associative memory using the marine mollusk Aplysia californica, a relatively simple model system well known for studies of learning and memory. DESIGN: Aplysia were sleep deprived for 9 h using context changes and tactile stimulation prior to or after training using the operant learning paradigm, learning that food is inedible (LFI)...
October 10, 2016: Sleep
Katharina Zinke, Ines Wilhelm, Müge Bayramoglu, Susanne Klein, Jan Born
Sleep is considered to support the formation of skill memory. In juvenile but not adult song birds learning a tutor's song, a stronger initial deterioration of song performance over night-sleep predicts better song performance in the long run. This and similar observations have stimulated the view of sleep supporting skill formation during development in an unsupervised off-line learning process that, in the absence of external feedback, can initially also enhance inaccuracies in skill performance. Here we explored whether in children learning a motor sequence task, as in song-learning juvenile birds, changes across sleep after initial practice predict performance levels achieved in the long run...
October 16, 2016: Developmental Science
Marie-Hélène Pilon, Stéphane Poulin, Marie-Pierre Fortin, Michèle Houde, Louis Verret, Rémi W Bouchard, Robert Laforce
Few studies have explored the rate of cognitive decline and caregiver burden within the context of a specialized memory clinic. When this was done, the focus was largely on functional decline related to Alzheimer's disease (AD). Our goal was to compare the longitudinal decline of AD patients to those with Vascular Dementia (VaD) on Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE). We further explored the differential impact on caregiver burden. We retrospectively studied 237 charts from patients seen at our Memory Clinic between 2006 and 2012...
March 11, 2016: Neurology (ECronicon)
Robert G Averkin, Viktor Szemenyei, Sándor Bordé, Gábor Tamás
Ultra-high-frequency network events in the hippocampus are instrumental in a dialogue with the neocortex during memory formation, but the existence of transient ∼200 Hz network events in the neocortex is not clear. Our recordings from neocortical layer II/III of freely behaving rats revealed field potential events at ripple and high-gamma frequencies repeatedly occurring at troughs of spindle oscillations during sleep. Juxtacellular recordings identified subpopulations of fast-spiking, parvalbumin-containing basket cells with epochs of firing at ripple (∼200 Hz) and high-gamma (∼120 Hz) frequencies detected during spindles and centered with millisecond precision at the trough of spindle waves in phase with field potential events but phase shifted relative to pyramidal cell firing...
October 12, 2016: Neuron
Lengqiu Guo, Zhuangli Guo, Xiaoqing Luo, Rui Liang, Shui Yang, Haigang Ren, Guanghui Wang, Xuechu Zhen
Sleep, particularly rapid eye movement (REM) sleep, is implicated in the consolidation of emotional memories. In the present study, we investigated the protective effects of a phosphodiesterase 10A (PDE10A) inhibitor MP-10 on deficits in long-term fear memory induced by REM sleep deprivation (REM-SD). REM-SD caused deficits in long-term fear memory, however, MP-10 administration ameliorated the deleterious effects of REM-SD on long term fear memory. Brain-derived neurotropic factor (BDNF) and phosphorylated cAMP response element-binding protein (pCREB) were altered in specific brain regions associated with learning and memory in REM-SD rats...
October 12, 2016: Neuroscience Letters
Dong V Wang, Satoshi Ikemoto
: Hippocampal-cortical interaction during sleep promotes transformation of memory for long-term storage in the cortex. In particular, hippocampal sharp-wave ripple-associated neural activation is important for this transformation during slow-wave sleep. The anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) has been shown to be crucial for expression and likely storage of long-term memory. However, little is known about how ACC activity is influenced by hippocampal ripple activity during sleep. We report here about coordinated interactions between hippocampal ripple activity and ACC neural firings...
October 12, 2016: Journal of Neuroscience: the Official Journal of the Society for Neuroscience
Xinqi Zhou, Taoyu Wu, Jing Yu, Xu Lei
Accumulating evidence supports that sleep deprivation (SD) and aging have similar effects: decreased cognition performance and impaired brain function. Some investigators even proposed the SD as a model of aging. However, few direct comparisons were ever explored between the effects of SD and aging by network module analysis with the resting-state fMRI. In this study, both within- and between-module connectivities were calculated in the whole brain to describe a complete picture of brain networks' functional connectivity among three groups (young normal sleep, young SD and old group)...
October 12, 2016: Brain Connectivity
S Cohen, G Ifergane, E Vainer, M A Matar, Z Kaplan, J Zohar, A A Mathé, H Cohen
Pharmacotherapeutic intervention during traumatic memory consolidation has been suggested to alleviate or even prevent the development of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). We recently reported that, in a controlled, prospective animal model, depriving rats of sleep following stress exposure prevents the development of a PTSD-like phenotype. Here, we report that administering the wake-promoting drug modafinil to rats in the aftermath of a stressogenic experience has a similar prophylactic effect, as it significantly reduces the prevalence of PTSD-like phenotype...
October 11, 2016: Translational Psychiatry
Timothy D Nelson, Katherine M Kidwell, Maren Hankey, Jennifer Mize Nelson, Kimberly Andrews Espy
OBJECTIVE: Although numerous studies have documented the effects of sleep loss on executive control (EC) and related abilities, research examining the impact of early EC on subsequent sleep problems is lacking. Therefore, the current study reports on a longitudinal investigation of EC in preschool as a predictor of sleep-wake problems and daytime sleepiness in early adolescence. PARTICIPANTS: The participants were 141 children (48.6% female) recruited from the community for a longitudinal study spanning preschool through early adolescence, with an oversampling for high sociodemographic risk (34...
October 11, 2016: Behavioral Sleep Medicine
Geneviève Albouy, Bradley R King, Christina Schmidt, Martin Desseilles, Thien Thanh Dang-Vu, Evelyne Balteau, Christophe Phillips, Christian Degueldre, Pierre Orban, Habib Benali, Philippe Peigneux, André Luxen, Avi Karni, Julien Doyon, Pierre Maquet, Maria Korman
Motor memory consolidation is characterized, in part, by a sleep-facilitated decrease in susceptibility to subsequent interfering experiences. Surprisingly, the cerebral substrates supporting this phenomenon have never been examined. We used fMRI to investigate the neural correlates of the influence of sleep on interference to motor memory consolidation. Healthy young adults were trained on a sequential motor task, and subsequently practiced a second competing sequence after an interval including diurnal sleep or wakefulness...
October 11, 2016: Scientific Reports
William A Liberti, Jeffrey E Markowitz, L Nathan Perkins, Derek C Liberti, Daniel P Leman, Grigori Guitchounts, Tarciso Velho, Darrell N Kotton, Carlos Lois, Timothy J Gardner
Motor skills can be maintained for decades, but the biological basis of this memory persistence remains largely unknown. The zebra finch, for example, sings a highly stereotyped song that is stable for years, but it is not known whether the precise neural patterns underlying song are stable or shift from day to day. Here we demonstrate that the population of projection neurons coding for song in the premotor nucleus, HVC, change from day to day. The most dramatic shifts occur over intervals of sleep. In contrast to the transient participation of excitatory neurons, ensemble measurements dominated by inhibition persist unchanged even after damage to downstream motor nerves...
October 10, 2016: Nature Neuroscience
Eyal Aronoff, Robert Hillyer, Michael Leon
We have previously shown in two randomized clinical trials that environmental enrichment is capable of ameliorating symptoms of autism spectrum disorder (ASD), and in the present study, we determined whether this therapy could be effective under real-world circumstances. 1,002 children were given daily Sensory Enrichment Therapy, by their parents, using personalized therapy instructions given over the Internet. Parents were asked to assess the symptoms of their child every 2 weeks for up to 7 months. An intention-to-treat analysis showed significant overall gains for a wide range of symptoms in these children, including learning, memory, anxiety, attention span, motor skills, eating, sleeping, sensory processing, self-awareness, communication, social skills, and mood/autism behaviors...
2016: Neural Plasticity
Xia Deng, Chun-Yan Tang, Jie Zhang, Lei Zhu, Zun-Chun Xie, Hong-Han Gong, Xiang-Zuo Xiao, Ren-Shi Xu
The cortical thickness has gained an extensive attention as a pathological alteration of sporadic Parkinson's disease (sPD), the alteration of pathological cortical thickness may distinctly contribute to the consistent clinical manifestations. Therefore, we investigated the cortical thickness correlates of clinical manifestations in the mid-stage sPD from the Han population of Chinese mainland (HPCM). A sample of 67 mid-stage sPD patients and 35 matched controls from HPCM were performed a corticometry of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and the assessment of clinical manifestations including the demographic and disease-related characteristics, and underwent the final analysis of the cortical thickness correlates with the clinical manifestations...
October 6, 2016: Neuroscience Letters
I Recio, J J Torres
We study emerging phenomena in binary neural networks where, with a probability c synaptic intensities are chosen according with a Hebbian prescription, and with probability (1-c) there is an extra random contribution to synaptic weights. This new term, randomly taken from a Gaussian bimodal distribution, balances the synaptic population in the network so that one has 80%-20% relation in E/I population ratio, mimicking the balance observed in mammals cortex. For some regions of the relevant parameters, our system depicts standard memory (at low temperature) and non-memory attractors (at high temperature)...
September 8, 2016: Neural Networks: the Official Journal of the International Neural Network Society
Jens G Klinzing, Björn Rasch, Jan Born, Susanne Diekelmann
Sleep is known to support the consolidation of newly encoded and initially labile memories. Once consolidated, remote memories can return to a labile state upon reactivation and need to become reconsolidated in order to persist. Here we asked whether sleep also benefits the reconsolidation of remote memories after their reactivation and how reconsolidation during sleep compares to sleep-dependent consolidation processes. In three groups, participants were trained on a visuo-spatial learning task in the presence of a contextual odor...
October 6, 2016: Neurobiology of Learning and Memory
Sue Llewellyn
Writing about dreaming, the poet Raymond Carver said "I feel as if I've crossed some kind of invisible line". In creative people, the "line" between wake, dreaming and psychopathology may be porous, engendering a de-differentiated, super-critical, hybrid state. Evidence exists for a relationship between creativity and psychopathology but its nature has been elusive. De-differentiation between wake, sleep and dreaming may be the common substrate, as dream-like cognition pervades wake and wake-like neurophysiology suffuses sleep...
October 5, 2016: Consciousness and Cognition
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