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Immigrant mental health

Yvonne Tieu, Candace Konnert, Leanne Quigley
Research on underutilization patterns of mental health services among older Chinese immigrants is limited, partly due to the absence of translated, psychometrically sound measures for assessing attitudes towards seeking help. In this study we interviewed 200 older Chinese Canadian immigrants using a translated version of the Inventory of Attitudes Toward Seeking Mental Health Services scale (IASMHS), and assessed mental health care utilization over the past 12 months and intentions to seek help. Confirmatory factor analysis failed to replicate the original three-factor structure; thus, we used exploratory factor analysis to create a 20-item Chinese version, the C-IASMHS...
March 19, 2018: Canadian Journal on Aging, la Revue Canadienne du Vieillissement
Krista M Perreira, Ashley N Marchante, Seth J Schwartz, Carmen R Isasi, Mercedes R Carnethon, Heather L Corliss, Robert C Kaplan, Daniel A Santisteban, Denise C Vidot, Linda Van Horn, Alan M Delamater
This study examined associations of immigrant generation, acculturation, and sources of stress and resilience with four outcomes-depression symptoms, anxiety symptoms, alcohol susceptibility, and smoking susceptibility. We used data from 1466 youth (ages 8-16) enrolled in the Hispanic Community Health Study of Latino Youth (SOL Youth), a probability sample of Hispanic/Latino youth living in Chicago (IL), Miami (FL), Bronx (NY), and San Diego (CA). We found no evidence of an immigrant paradox. Greater children's acculturative stress was associated with depression/anxiety symptoms; greater parent's acculturative stress was associated with smoking susceptibility...
March 17, 2018: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health
Carla T Hilario, John L Oliffe, Josephine P Wong, Annette J Browne, Joy L Johnson
Distress among young immigrant and refugee men has drawn increasing research attention in recent years. Nuanced understandings of distress are needed to inform mental health and public health programming. The purpose of this research was to examine distress from the perspectives of young immigrant and refugee men living in Greater Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. Thirty-three young men (aged 15-22 years) from diverse immigrant and refugee backgrounds participated in interviews, which were conducted between 2014 and 2015...
March 1, 2018: Health (London)
Claire E Kendall, Esther S Shoemaker, Janet Raboud, Amy E Mark, Ahmed M Bayoumi, Ann N Burchell, Mona Loutfy, Sean B Rourke, Clare E Liddy, Ron Rosenes, Timothy Rogers, Tony Antoniou
Timely presentation to care for people newly diagnosed with HIV is critical to optimize health outcomes and reduce onward HIV transmission. Studies describing presentation to care following diagnosis during a hospital admission are lacking. We sought to assess the timeliness of presentation to care and to identify factors associated with delayed presentation. We conducted a population-level study using health administrative databases. Participants were all individuals older than 16 and newly diagnosed with HIV during hospital admission in Ontario, Canada, between April 1, 2007 and March 31, 2015...
March 13, 2018: AIDS and Behavior
Jennifer Hebert-Beirne, Sarah Gabriella Hernandez, Jennifer Felner, Jessica Schwiesow, Anna Mayer, Kevin Rak, Noel Chávez, Yvette Castañeda, Joan Kennelly
In predominately immigrant neighborhoods, the nuances of immigrant life in the ethnic enclave have important, yet underappreciated impact on community health. The complexities of immigrant experiences are essential to unpacking and addressing the impact of acculturative processes on observed racial, ethnic, and class-based health disparities in the United States. These insights because they are largely unexplored are best captured qualitatively through academic-community research partnership. We established the participatory mixed method Little Village participatory community health assessment (CHA) to explore community health in an ethnic enclave...
March 8, 2018: Journal of Community Health
Stephanie A Torres, Catherine DeCarlo Santiago, Katherine Kaufka Walts, Maryse H Richards
Currently, 15 million Mexican and Central American individuals live in the United States, with this number projected to rise in the next few decades (Lesser & Batalova, 2017; Zong & Batalova, 2017). Research has begun to investigate the impact of the nation's immigration practices and policies on immigrant Latino/a families and youth. Current immigration policies can create vulnerabilities, including fear and mistrust, discrimination, limited access to services, parent-child separation, and poverty...
March 5, 2018: American Psychologist
Yolanda Covington-Ward, Kafuli Agbemenu, Annamore Matambanadzo
BACKGROUND: This study examines stress and stress management from the perspective of African immigrants in southwestern Pennsylvania. Our research questions explore how participants define stress, the most common causes of stress, manifestations of stress, and common strategies for stress management. METHODS: We conducted a descriptive, cross-sectional, qualitative study with 34 African immigrants. Data were collected via three focus groups. Qualitative data were audio-recorded, transcribed verbatim, and analyzed to identify common themes...
2018: Journal of Health Care for the Poor and Underserved
Anthony F Jorm, Anna M Ross, Erminia Colucci
BACKGROUND: A number of Delphi expert consensus studies have been carried out with different countries and cultural groups to develop guidelines on how a member of the public should provide assistance to a person who is suicidal. The present study aimed to determine whether cross-culturally generalizable suicide first aid actions are possible by comparing agreement across these Delphi studies. METHODS: Data on endorsement rates for items were compared across six Delphi studies...
March 1, 2018: BMC Psychiatry
Richard C Cervantes, Karina A Gattamorta, Jodi Berger-Cardoso
Little is known about the specific behavioral health impact of acculturation stressors that affect Hispanic/Latino immigrant sub-groups. These immigration-related stressors and traumatic events may have differential impact on depression depending on country/region of origin. Using a measure of immigration and acculturation stress, the current study sought to determine differences in the impact of stress on six sub-groups of Hispanic immigrants. Data on stress and depression were examined using a large, representative adult immigrant sample (N = 641)...
February 27, 2018: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health
Jennifer Nazareno
The U.S. government has a long tradition of providing direct care services to many of its most vulnerable citizens through market-based solutions and subsidized private entities. The privatized welfare state has led to the continued displacement of some of our most disenfranchised groups in need of long-term care. Situated after the U.S. deinstitutionalization era, this is the first study to examine how immigrant Filipino women emerged as owners of de facto mental health care facilities that cater to the displaced, impoverished, severely mentally ill population...
January 1, 2018: International Journal of Health Services: Planning, Administration, Evaluation
Michael Lebenbaum, Maria Chiu, Simone Vigod, Paul Kurdyak
BACKGROUND: Involuntary admissions to psychiatric hospitals are common; however, research examining the trends in prevalence over time and predictors is limited. Aims To examine trends in prevalence and risk factors for involuntary admissions in Ontario, Canada. METHOD: We conducted an analysis of all mental health bed admissions from 2009 to 2013 and assessed the association between patient sociodemographics, service utilisation, pathway to care and severity characteristics for involuntary admissions using a modified Poisson regression...
March 2018: BJPsych Open
L Corscadden, J F Levesque, V Lewis, E Strumpf, M Breton, G Russell
BACKGROUND: Disparities in access to primary care (PC) have been demonstrated within and between health systems. However, few studies have assessed the factors associated with multiple barriers to access occurring along the care-seeking process in different healthcare systems. METHODS: In this secondary analysis of the 2016 Commonwealth Fund International Health Policy Survey of Adults, access was represented through participant responses to questions relating to access barriers either before or after reaching the PC practice in 11 countries (Australia, Canada, France, Germany, Norway, the Netherlands, New Zealand, Sweden, Switzerland, the United Kingdom, and United States)...
February 20, 2018: International Journal for Equity in Health
Winnie W Kung, Xinhua Liu, Debbie Huang, Patricia Kim, Xiaoran Wang, Lawrence H Yang
Despite the fact that Asians constituted a sizeable proportion of those exposed to the World Trade Center attack on September 11, 2001 due to its proximity to Chinatown and many South Asians working in the nearby buildings, no study had focused on examining the mental health impact of the attack in this group. Based on data collected by the World Trade Center Health Registry from a sample of 4721 Asians 2-3 years after the disaster, this study provides a baseline investigation for the prevalence and the risk and protective factors for PTSD among Asian Americans directly exposed to the attack and compared this population against 42,862 non-Hispanic Whites...
February 15, 2018: Journal of Urban Health: Bulletin of the New York Academy of Medicine
Carla C Schubert, Raija-Leena Punamäki, Jaana Suvisaari, Päivikki Koponen, Anu Castaneda
Multiple psychosocial factors influence help-seeking behavior among immigrants, but studies have focused on separate issues in single cultural groups. This study tested a model of help-seeking behavior among three ethnically different immigrant groups. Participants were 1356 Somali, Russian, and Kurdish immigrants (18-64 years). They reported past traumatic events, social network, acculturation indices, trust in services, and mental health as well as usage of mental and somatic health services. Structural equation modeling (SEM) with multigroup procedure was applied...
February 13, 2018: Journal of Behavioral Health Services & Research
Alana M W LeBrón, Michael Spencer, Edith Kieffer, Brandy Sinco, Gloria Palmisano
Discrimination is associated with adverse health outcomes, but few studies have examined the association of discrimination with diabetes-related outcomes including mental health and glycemic control, particularly for immigrant and US-born Latinos. We analyzed survey data (n = 222) collected at baseline of a diabetes intervention. Using multiple linear regression, we examined the association of racial/ethnic discrimination with depressive symptoms, diabetes-related distress, and HbA1c, and variation in these associations by nativity and, for immigrants, length of US residence...
February 12, 2018: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health
Nancy López, Edward D Vargas, Melina Juarez, Lisa Cacari-Stone, Sonia Bettez
Using the 2015 Latino National Health and Immigration Survey (N= 1,197) we examine the relationship between physical and mental health status and three multidimensional measures of race: 1) "street race," or how you believe other "Americans" perceive your race at the level of the street; 2) socially assigned race or what we call "ascribed race," which refers to how you believe others usually classify your race in the U.S.; and 3) "self-perceived race," or how you usually self-classify your race on questionnaires...
January 2018: Sociology of Race and Ethnicity (Thousand Oaks, Calif.)
Van Ta Park, Khue Nguyen, Yvonne Tran, Gwen Yeo, Quyen Tiet, Joyce Suen, Dolores Gallagher-Thompson
OBJECTIVE: Little is known about dementia and caregiving among the rapidly growing Vietnamese American population. This qualitative study elicited insights on culturally tailoring an intervention to address mental health needs in Vietnamese American dementia caregivers from Vietnamese American mental health professionals. METHODS: Eight Vietnamese American mental health professionals were interviewed to explore: experiences working with and needs of the community; Vietnamese attitudes toward treatment; and acculturation in Vietnamese caregiving...
January 30, 2018: Clinical Gerontologist
Su Yeong Kim, Seth J Schwartz, Krista M Perreira, Linda P Juang
Children of immigrants represent one in four children in the United States and will represent one in three children by 2050. Children of Asian and Latino immigrants together represent the majority of children of immigrants in the United States. Children of immigrants may be immigrants themselves, or they may have been born in the United States to foreign-born parents; their status may be legal or undocumented. We review transcultural and culture-specific factors that influence the various ways in which stressors are experienced; we also discuss the ways in which parental socialization and developmental processes function as risk factors or protective factors in their influence on the mental health of children of immigrants...
January 24, 2018: Annual Review of Clinical Psychology
Pratyusha Tummala-Narra, Zhushan Li, Janet Chang, Eun Jeong Yang, Jing Jiang, Michael Sagherian, Jenny Phan, Alyssa Alfonso
Guided by an integrative contextual framework of immigrant youth development (García Coll & Marks, 2012), this study investigated the potential role of developmental (e.g., ethnic identity) and contextual factors (e.g., perceived discrimination, stereotyping) in mental health outcomes and help-seeking attitudes, and variations across gender and nativity among Asian American college students. Online surveys assessing perceived subtle and blatant racism, ethnic identity, the internalization of the model minority stereotype, depressive symptoms, anxiety symptoms, and attitudes toward seeking help from mental health professionals were administered to Asian American college student participants (n = 465) from diverse ethnic backgrounds and geographic regions in the United States...
February 1, 2018: American Journal of Orthopsychiatry
Julie Pannetier, France Lert, Marie Jauffret Roustide, Annabel Desgrées du Loû
In Europe, migrants are at higher risk of common mental disorders or psychological distress than are natives. Little is known regarding the social determinants of migrant mental health, particularly the roles played by migration conditions and transnational practices, which may manifest themselves in different ways for men and for women. The goal of this paper was to understand the gendered roles of migration paths and transnational ties in mental health among sub-Saharan African migrants residing in the Paris, France, metropolitan area...
December 2017: SSM—Population Health
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