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Intracranial hypertension management

Mohammed Rigi, Khurrum Khan, Stacy V Smith, Ayman O Suleiman, Andrew G Lee
Cryptococcal meningitis (CM) is the most common and severe form of cryptococcal infection. In addition to infiltrative and inflammatory mechanisms, intracranial hypertension commonly complicates CM and may cause significant visual and neurological morbidity and mortality. The mainstays of treatment for CM include standard antifungal therapy, management of intracranial hypertension, and treatment of underlying immunosuppressive conditions. Early and aggressive management of intracranial hypertension in accordance with established guidelines reduces the risk of long term visual and neurological complications and death...
October 14, 2016: Survey of Ophthalmology
Lorena Monge Galindo, Ruth Fernando Martínez, Cristina Fuertes Rodrigo, David Fustero de Miguel, Victoria Pueyo Royo, Juan Pablo García Iñiguez, Javier López-Pisón, José Luis Peña-Segura
INTRODUCTION: We present our experience on idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH), before and after the introduction of a specific diagnosis and management protocol. METHOD: A descriptive retrospective study was conducted on patients with IIH over a 25year period (1990-2015), comparing the last 7years (after introduction of the protocol) with the previous 18years. RESULTS: Among the 18,865 patients evaluated, there were 54 cases of IIH (29 infants and 25 children)...
October 13, 2016: Anales de Pediatría: Publicación Oficial de la Asociación Española de Pediatría (A.E.P.)
Michael A Bohl, James Forseth, Peter Nakaji
BACKGROUND: Arginine vasopressin (AVP) is a common second-line or third-line vasopressor used in critically ill neurosurgical patients. Neurosurgical indications include hyperdynamic therapy for vasospasm, maintenance of cerebral perfusion pressure in patients with intracranial hypertension, and prevention of hypotension in patients with sepsis. CASE DESCRIPTION: A series of six neurosurgical patients receiving AVP infusions developed severe but transient diabetes insipidus (tDI) after cessation of AVP...
October 11, 2016: World Neurosurgery
Ryan Hakimi, Ankur Garg
PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Hemorrhagic stroke comprises approximately 15% to 20% of all strokes. This article provides readers with an understanding of the indications and significance of various neuroimaging techniques available for patients presenting with hemorrhagic strokes of distinct causes. RECENT FINDINGS: The most common initial neuroimaging study is a noncontrast head CT, which allows for the identification of hemorrhage. Once an intracranial hemorrhage has been identified, the pattern of blood and the patient's medical history, neurologic examination, and laboratory studies lead the practitioner to pursue further neuroimaging studies to guide the medical, surgical, and interventional management...
October 2016: Continuum: Lifelong Learning in Neurology
Zachary D Threlkeld, Mohan Kottapally, Aimee Aysenne, Nerissa Ko
Intracranial pressure (ICP) monitoring frequently guides key decisions in the management of diseases causing intracranial hypertension. Although typically measured by invasive means, contraindications may leave the clinician with little recourse for dynamic ICP evaluation-particularly when the patient's mental status is compromised. We describe here a healthy 18-year-old woman who subacutely progressed to coma due to diffuse cerebral venous sinus thrombosis. Heparinization precluded the use of invasive ICP monitoring, and electroencephalography (EEG) was used novelly as a surrogate ICP monitor...
October 2016: Neurohospitalist
Renato Gondar, Oliver Pascal Gautschi, Johanna Cuony, Fabienne Perren, Max Jägersberg, Marco-Vincenzo Corniola, Bawarjan Schatlo, Granit Molliqaj, Sandrine Morel, Zsolt Kulcsár, Vitor Mendes Pereira, Daniel Rüfenacht, Karl Schaller, Philippe Bijlenga
BACKGROUND: The management of small unruptured incidentally discovered intracranial aneurysms (SUIAs) is still controversial. The aim of this study is to assess the safety of a management protocol of SUIAs, where selected cases with SUIAs are observed and secured only if signs of instability (growth) are documented. METHODS: A prospective consecutive cohort of 292 patients (2006-2014) and 368 SUIAs (anterior circulation aneurysms (ACs) smaller than 7 mm and posterior circulation aneurysms smaller than 4 mm without previous subarachnoid haemorrhage) was observed (mean follow-up time of 3...
September 30, 2016: Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery, and Psychiatry
Juan Antonio Llompart-Pou, Mario Chico-Fernández, Marcelino Sánchez-Casado, Fermín Alberdi-Odriozola, Francisco Guerrero-López, María Dolores Mayor-García, Javier González-Robledo, María Ángeles Ballesteros-Sanz, Rubén Herrán-Monge, Rafael León-López, Lucía López-Amor, Ana Bueno-González
BACKGROUND: Injury patterns may differ in trauma patients when age is considered. This information is relevant in the management of trauma patients and for planning preventive measures. METHODS: We included in the study all patients admitted for traumatic disease in the participating ICUs from November 23(rd), 2012 to July 31(st), 2015 with complete records. Data on epidemiology, injury patterns, severity scores, acute management, resources utilisation and outcome were recorded and compared in the following groups of age: ≤55years (young adults), 56-65 years (adults), 66-75 years (elderly), >75years (very elderly)...
September 2016: Injury
Kirsten Morrissey, Hilary Fairbrother
More than 1.7 million traumatic brain injuries occur in adults and children each year in the United States, with approximately 30% occurring in children aged < 14 years. Traumatic brain injury is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in pediatric trauma patients. Early identification and management of severe traumatic brain injury is crucial in decreasing the risk of secondary brain injury and optimizing outcome. The main focus for early management of severe traumatic brain injury is to mitigate and prevent secondary injury, specifically by avoiding hypotension and hypoxia, which have been associated with poorer outcomes...
October 2016: Pediatric Emergency Medicine Practice
Eric W Sankey, Benjamin D Elder, Ann Liu, Kathryn A Carson, C Rory Goodwin, Ignacio Jusué-Torres, Daniele Rigamonti
OBJECTIVE Factors associated with emergency department admission and/or shunt revision for idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) are unclear. In this study, the associations of several factors with emergency department admission and shunt revision for IIH were explored. METHODS The authors performed a retrospective review of 31 patients (169 total emergency department visits) who presented to the emergency department for IIH-related symptoms between 2003 and 2015. Demographics, comorbidities, symptoms, IIH diagnosis and treatment history, ophthalmological examination, diagnostic lumbar puncture (LP), imaging findings, and data regarding admission and management decisions were collected...
September 23, 2016: Journal of Neurosurgery
Maya Kumar, Sheila Gahagan, Bretten Pickering, Jeffrey Gold, Martin T Stein
Jennifer is a 16-year-old Latina girl who is new to your practice. During her first well visit, she mentions that she has had daily headaches for 2 years. They began after sustaining a concussion in a car accident. Typically, her headaches are bilateral and "squeezing"; they occur in the afternoons and last for a few hours. Her concussion also resulted in depressed mood, which has improved over time.When you ask if her headaches have changed recently, she says that they have been worse for the last few days...
September 20, 2016: Journal of Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics: JDBP
Lin Shi
According to the seventh report of Joint National Committee (JNC 7), hypertensive emergency (HE), a kind of hypertensive crisis, is defined as a sudden and abrupt elevation in blood pressure so as to cause acute target organ dysfunctions, including central nervous system, cardiovascular system or kidneys. Patients with HE require immediate reduction in markedly elevated blood pressure. Currently, there are no international guidelines for children HE, so the JNC definition is commonly used. Hypertensive emergency in children is rare but a life-threatening emergency...
September 2016: Journal of Hypertension
Kazuyuki Shimada
Stroke is known to frequently recur in patients with a history of cerebrovascular disease, and the control of hypertension is extremely important for the treatment of those patients. The robust relationship between the recurrent cerebrovascular disease and blood pressure control has been demonstrated in large-scale clinical studies. The antihypertensive drug therapy significantly reduces the recurrence rate of all types of cerebrovascular disease, incidences of myocardial infarction and all vascular events...
September 2016: Journal of Hypertension
Airton Leonardo de Oliveira Manoel, Alberto Goffi, Fernando Godinho Zampieri, David Turkel-Parrella, Abhijit Duggal, Thomas R Marotta, R Loch Macdonald, Simon Abrahamson
Spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH), defined as nontraumatic bleeding into the brain parenchyma, is the second most common subtype of stroke, with 5.3 million cases and over 3 million deaths reported worldwide in 2010. Case fatality is extremely high (reaching approximately 60 % at 1 year post event). Only 20 % of patients who survive are independent within 6 months. Factors such as chronic hypertension, cerebral amyloid angiopathy, and anticoagulation are commonly associated with ICH. Chronic arterial hypertension represents the major risk factor for bleeding...
2016: Critical Care: the Official Journal of the Critical Care Forum
Jeffrey Wagner, Cara M Fleseriu, Aly Ibrahim, Justin S Cetas
BACKGROUND: Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) in patients with Cushing disease (CD), after treatment, is rarely described, in adults. The cause is believed to be multifactorial, potentially related to a relative decrease in cortisol after surgical resection or medical treatment of a corticotroph pituitary adenoma. We investigate our center's CD database (140 surgically and 60 medically [primary or adjunct] treated patients) for cases of IIH, describe our center's experience with symptomatic IIH, and review treatment strategies in adults with CD after transsphenoidal resection...
September 12, 2016: World Neurosurgery
Lauren K Dunn, Bhiken I Naik, Edward C Nemergut, Marcel E Durieux
Craniotomy pain may be severe and is often undertreated. Pain management following craniotomy is a balancing act of achieving adequate analgesia but avoiding sedation, respiratory depression, hypercapnia, nausea and vomiting, and hypertension. Opioids are a first-line analgesic therapy; however, concern that opioid-related adverse effects (sedation, respiratory depression) may interfere with neurologic assessment and increase intracranial pressure has limited use of these drugs for intracranial surgery. Non-opioid analgesics avoid these effects and may be useful as part of a multimodal regimen for post-craniotomy pain...
October 2016: Current Neurology and Neuroscience Reports
Courtney J Cook
Induced hypothermia (IH) continues to become a more prevalent treatment modality in neurocritical care. Reducing core temperature has been shown to protect brain tissue during injury and disease. IH has been particularly beneficial in the medical management of refractory intracranial hypertension and malignant cerebral edema. These pathologies are often the result of diffuse cerebral edema after traumatic brain injury, malignant ischemic stroke, or intracerebral hemorrhage. Although there are many benefits to IH, it is not without complications...
September 5, 2016: Journal of Neuroscience Nursing: Journal of the American Association of Neuroscience Nurses
Aubrey L Gilbert, Gena Heidary
PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Papilledema associated with idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) may result in irreversible, progressive visual loss. The development of tools for the evaluation of pediatric patients with IIH is particularly relevant as many patients may not be able to comply with the detailed clinical evaluation utilized in adults for the treatment and management of this disease. The purpose of this review is to summarize relevant articles on the diagnostic tools used in evaluation and management of pediatric IIH...
November 2016: Current Opinion in Ophthalmology
Fernando Mendes Paschoal, Ricardo Carvalho Nogueira, Karla De Almeida Lins Ronconi, Marcelo de Lima Oliveira, Manoel Jacobsen Teixeira, Edson Bor-Seng-Shu
Acute liver failure, also known as fulminant hepatic failure (FHF), embraces a spectrum of clinical entities characterized by acute liver injury, severe hepatocellular dysfunction, and hepatic encephalopathy. Cerebral edema and intracranial hypertension are common causes of mortality in patients with FHF. The management of patients who present acute liver failure starts with determining the cause and an initial evaluation of prognosis. Regardless of whether or not patients are listed for liver transplantation, they should still be monitored for recovery, death, or transplantation...
August 8, 2016: World Journal of Hepatology
G K Rangan, M C Tchan, A Tong, A T Y Wong, B J Nankivell
Autosomal-dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is the most common genetic renal disease in adults, affecting one in every 1000 Australians. It is caused by loss-of-function heterozygous mutations in either PKD1 or PKD2 , which encode the proteins, polycystin-1 and polycystin-2 respectively. The disease hallmark is the development of hundreds of microscopic fluid-filled cysts in the kidney during early childhood, which grow exponentially and continuously through life at varying rates (between 2% and 10% per year), causing loss of normal renal tissue and up to a 50% lifetime risk of dialysis-dependent kidney failure...
August 2016: Internal Medicine Journal
Mohammad Sadegh Masoudi, Elahe Rezaee, Hasanali Hakiminejad, Maryam Tavakoli, Tayebe Sadeghpoor
Main goal in the management of patients with severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) is control of intracranial pressure (ICP). Decompressive craniectomy is an accepted technique for control of refractory intracranial hypertension in patients with severe TBI. Because of high complication rate after decompressive craniectomy, new techniques such as basal cisternostomy have developed. We herein report a case of severe TBI in a 13-year-old boy treated by cisternostomy. The patient was admitted following a motor vehicle accident...
July 2016: Bulletin of Emergency and Trauma
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