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Review of Alzheimer

M Amélia Santos, Karam Chand, Sílvia Chaves
Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a serious progressive neurological disorder, characterized by impaired cognition and profound irreversible memory loss. The multifactorial nature of AD and the absence of a cure so far have stimulated medicinal chemists worldwide to follow multitarget drug-design strategies based on repositioning approved drugs. This review describes a summary of recently published works focused on tailoring new derivatives of US FDA-approved acetylcholinesterase inhibitors, in addition to huperzine (a drug approved in China), either by hybridization with other pharmacophore elements (to hit more AD targets), or by combination of two FDA-approved drugs...
October 24, 2016: Future Medicinal Chemistry
Chatchai Muanprasat, Varanuj Chatsudthipong
Chitosan oligosaccharide (COS) is an oligomer of β-(1➔4)-linked D-glucosamine. COS can be prepared from the deacetylation and hydrolysis of chitin, which is commonly found in the exoskeletons of arthropods and insects and the cell walls of fungi. COS is water soluble, non-cytotoxic, readily absorbed through the intestine and mainly excreted in the urine. Of particular importance, COS and its derivatives have been demonstrated to possess several biological activities including anti-inflammation, immunostimulation, anti-tumor, anti-obesity, anti-hypertension, anti-Alzheimer's disease, tissue regeneration promotion, drug and DNA delivery enhancement, anti-microbial, anti-oxidation and calcium-absorption enhancement...
October 20, 2016: Pharmacology & Therapeutics
Tianfang Jiang, Qian Sun, Shengdi Chen
Oxidative stress reflects an imbalance between the overproduction and incorporation of free radicals and the dynamic ability of a biosystem to detoxify reactive intermediates. Free radicals produced by oxidative stress are one of the common features in several experimental models of diseases. Free radicals affect both the structure and function of neural cells, and contribute to a wide range of neurodegenerative diseases, including Parkinson's disease and Alzheimer's disease. Although the precise mechanisms that result in the degeneration of neurons and the relevant pathological changes remain unclear, the crucial role of oxidative stress in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases is associated with several proteins (such as α-synuclein, DJ-1, Amyloid β and tau protein) and some signaling pathways (such as extracellular regulated protein kinases, phosphoinositide 3-kinase/Protein Kinase B pathway and extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2) that are tightly associated with the neural damage...
October 18, 2016: Progress in Neurobiology
Jia Cheng, XiaoFeng Guo, Tian Zhang, Li Zhong, GuoJun Bu, XiaoFen Chen
Triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells (TREMs) receptors constitute a family modulators in human innate immunity system that encode by a gene cluster. Rare variants in TREM2 were reported to be associated with significant Alzheimer's disease (AD) risk. However, inconsistent results were also reported in some studies of Non-European descents. Recently, the other TREM family members are also considered to involve in AD and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) soluble form of TREM2 (sTREM2) levels has also been associated with respond to progression of disease...
October 18, 2016: Clinica Chimica Acta; International Journal of Clinical Chemistry
Qian Cai, Prasad Tammineni
Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by brain deposition of amyloid plaques and tau neurofibrillary tangles along with steady cognitive decline. Synaptic damage, an early pathological event, correlates strongly with cognitive deficits and memory loss. Mitochondria are essential organelles for synaptic function. Neurons utilize specialized mechanisms to drive mitochondrial trafficking to synapses in which mitochondria buffer Ca2+ and serve as local energy sources by supplying ATP to sustain neurotransmitter release...
October 20, 2016: Journal of Alzheimer's Disease: JAD
Dah Ihm Kim, Ki Hoon Lee, Ji Young Oh, Jun Sung Kim, Ho Jae Han
Mitochondria as dynamic organelles undergo morphological changes through the processes of fission and fusion which are major factors regulating their functions. A disruption in the balance of mitochondrial dynamics induces functional disorders in mitochondria such as failed energy production and the generation of reactive oxygen species, which are closely related to pathophysiological changes associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD). Recent studies have demonstrated a relationship between abnormalities in mitochondrial dynamics and impaired mitochondrial function, clarifying the effects of morphofunctional aberrations which promote neuronal cell death in AD...
October 20, 2016: Cellular and Molecular Neurobiology
K Rygiel
Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disease, in which an accumulation of toxic amyloid beta in the brain precedes the emergence of clinical symptoms. AD spectrum consists of presymptomatic, early symptomatic, and symptomatic phase of dementia. At present, no pharmacotherapy exists to modify or reverse a course of AD, and only symptomatic treatments are available. Many elderly patients, diagnosed with multiple medical conditions (such as cardiovascular diseases, Type 2 diabetes mellitus, and cerebrovascular diseases) are at increased risk of the development of mild cognitive impairment (MCI), AD, and vascular dementia...
October 2016: Journal of Postgraduate Medicine
Qingxi Zhang, Wanling Chen, Sheng Tan, Tongxiang Lin
Parkinson's disease (PD) is the second most frequent neurodegenerative disease after Alzheimer's disease, which is characterized by low level of dopamine expressing in the striatum and deteriorated dopaminergic neurons (DAn) in Substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc). Generation of PD-derived DAn including differentiation of human embryonic stem cell (hESC), human neural stem cell (hNSC), human induced pluripotent stem cell (hiPSC) and directly reprogramming provide an ideal tool to model PD, which created the possibilities of mimicking key essential pathological processes charactering single cell changes in vitro...
October 20, 2016: Human Gene Therapy
M Florencia Iulita, Hélène Girouard
Hypertension and dementia are two of the most prevalent and damaging diseases associated with aging. Chronic hypertension, particularly during mid-life, is a strong risk factor for late-life cognitive decline and impairment. Hypertension is also the number one risk factor for stroke and a major contributor to the pathogenesis of vascular dementia and Alzheimer's disease. Despite the vast epidemiologic and mechanistic evidence linking hypertension to cognitive impairment, and the positive effects of blood pressure lowering on reducing the risk of post-stroke dementia, uncertainty remains about the benefit of antihypertensive medication on other forms of dementia...
October 19, 2016: Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology
Orjan Skogar, Johan Lokk
This review focuses on the diagnosis and management of Parkinson-related pain which is one of the more frequently reported nonmotor symptoms in Parkinson's disease (PD), which is the second most common neurodegenerative disease after Alzheimer's disease. Pain is ranked high by patients as a troublesome symptom in all stages of the disease. In early-stage PD, pain is rated as the most bothersome symptom. Knowledge of the correct diagnosis of pain origin and possible methods of treatments for pain relief in PD is of great importance...
2016: Journal of Multidisciplinary Healthcare
Zhiyou Cai, Chuanling Wang, Wenming Yang
Berberine, an important protoberberine isoquinoline alkaloid, has several pharmacological activities, including antimicrobial, glucose- and cholesterol-lowering, antitumoral, and immunomodulatory properties. Substantial studies suggest that berberine may be beneficial to Alzheimer's disease (AD) by limiting the pathogenesis of extracellular amyloid plaques and intracellular neurofibrillary tangles. Increasing evidence has indicated that berberine exerts a protective role in atherosclerosis related to lipid- and glucose-lowering properties, implicating that berberine has the potential to inhibit these risk factors for AD...
2016: Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment
Natarajan Suganthy, Kasi Pandima Devi, Seyed Fazel Nabavi, Nady Braidy, Seyed Mohammad Nabavi
Quercetin, a ubiquitous flavonoid that is widely distributed in plants is classified as a cognitive enhancer in traditional and oriental medicine. The protective effects of quercetin for the treatment of neurodegenerative disorders and cerebrovascular diseases have been demonstrated in both in vitro and in vivo studies. The free radical scavenging activity of quercetin has been well-documented, wherein quercetin has been observed to exhibit protective effects against oxidative stress mediated neuronal damage by modulating the expression of NRF-2 dependent antioxidant responsive elements, and attenuation of neuroinflammation by suppressing NF-κB signal transducer and activator of transcription-1 (STAT-1)...
October 15, 2016: Biomedicine & Pharmacotherapy, Biomédecine & Pharmacothérapie
Samina Salim
Biochemical integrity of the brain is vital for normal functioning of the central nervous system (CNS). One of the contributing factors of cerebral biochemical impairment is a chemical process called oxidative stress. Oxidative stress occurs upon excessive free radical production due to insufficiency of counteracting antioxidant response system. The brain with its high oxygen consumption and lipid-rich content is highly susceptible to oxidative stress. Therefore, oxidative stress-induced damage to the brain has a strong potential to negatively impact normal CNS functions...
October 17, 2016: Journal of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics
Leroy L Cooper, Gary F Mitchell
BACKGROUND: Aortic stiffness is associated with cardiovascular and cerebrovascular events and cognitive decline. This mini-review focuses on relations of aortic stiffness with microvascular dysfunction and discusses the contribution of abnormal pulsatile hemodynamics to cerebrovascular damage and cognitive decline. We also provide a rationale for considering aortic stiffness as a putative and important contributor to memory impairment in older individuals. SUMMARY: Aging is associated with stiffening of the aorta but not the muscular arteries, which reduces wave reflection and increases the transmission of pulsatility into the periphery...
September 2016: Pulse (Basel, Switzerland)
Michael R Hamblin
Photobiomodulation (PBM) describes the use of red or near-infrared light to stimulate, heal, regenerate, and protect tissue that has either been injured, is degenerating, or else is at risk of dying. One of the organ systems of the human body that is most necessary to life, and whose optimum functioning is most worried about by humankind in general, is the brain. The brain suffers from many different disorders that can be classified into three broad groupings: traumatic events (stroke, traumatic brain injury, and global ischemia), degenerative diseases (dementia, Alzheimer's and Parkinson's), and psychiatric disorders (depression, anxiety, post traumatic stress disorder)...
December 2016: BBA Clinical
Mansi R Khanna, Jane Kovalevich, Virginia M-Y Lee, John Q Trojanowski, Kurt R Brunden
A group of neurodegenerative diseases referred to as tauopathies are characterized by the presence of brain cells harboring inclusions of pathological species of the tau protein. These disorders include Alzheimer's disease and frontotemporal lobar degeneration due to tau pathology, including progressive supranuclear palsy, corticobasal degeneration, and Pick's disease. Tau is normally a microtubule (MT)-associated protein that appears to play an important role in ensuring proper axonal transport, but in tauopathies tau becomes hyperphosphorylated and disengages from MTs, with consequent misfolding and deposition into inclusions that mainly affect neurons but also glia...
October 2016: Alzheimer's & Dementia: the Journal of the Alzheimer's Association
Qian Zhao, Xueqi Chen, Yun Zhou
Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder, causing changes in memory, thinking, and other dysfunction of brain functions. More and more people are suffering from the disease. Early neuroimaging techniques of AD are needed to develop. This review provides a preliminary summary of the various neuroimaging techniques that have been explored for in vivo imaging of AD. Recent advances in magnetic resonance (MR) techniques, such as functional MR imaging (fMRI) and diffusion MRI, give opportunities to display not only anatomy and atrophy of the medial temporal lobe, but also at microstructural alterations or perfusion disturbance within the AD lesions...
March 2016: Brain Informatics
Chuanchuan Zheng, Yong Xia, Yongsheng Pan, Jinhu Chen
In this review paper, we summarized the automated dementia identification algorithms in the literature from a pattern classification perspective. Since most of those algorithms consist of both feature extraction and classification, we provide a survey on three categories of feature extraction methods, including the voxel-, vertex- and ROI-based ones, and four categories of classifiers, including the linear discriminant analysis, Bayes classifiers, support vector machines, and artificial neural networks. We also compare the reported performance of many recently published dementia identification algorithms...
March 2016: Brain Informatics
Erika Herrero-Garcia, John P O'Bryan
Intersectins (ITSNs) are a family of multi-domain proteins involved in regulation of diverse cellular pathways. These scaffold proteins are well known for regulating endocytosis but also play important roles in cell signaling pathways including kinase regulation and Ras activation. ITSNs participate in several human cancers, such as neuroblastomas and glioblastomas, while its downregulation is associated with lung injury. Alterations in ITSN expression have been found in neurodegenerative diseases such as Down Syndrome and Alzheimer's disease...
October 12, 2016: Biochimica et Biophysica Acta
E M Ribe, S Lovestone
As populations across the world both age and become more obese, the numbers of individuals with Alzheimer's disease and diabetes are increasing; posing enormous challenges for society and consequently becoming priorities for governments and global organizations. These issues, an ageing population at risk of neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease and an increasingly obese population at risk of metabolic alterations such as type 2 diabetes, are usually considered as independent conditions, but increasing evidence from both epidemiological and molecular studies link these disorders...
October 14, 2016: Journal of Internal Medicine
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