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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28290953/chief-of-residents-for-quality-improvement-and-patient-safety-a-recipe-for-a-new-role-in-graduate-medical-education
#1
Kelly Ferraro, Randall Zernzach, Stephen Maturo, Christopher Nagy, Rebecca Barrett
INTRODUCTION: The San Antonio Uniformed Services Health Education Consortium (SAUSHEC) is the largest group of residency programs in the Department of Defense. In an effort to provide improved Quality Improvement and Patient Safety (QI/PS) training for its residents, SAUSHEC created the position of Chief of QI/PS for Residents in the academic year 2014-2015. The Chief of QI/PS for Residents was based in the Internal Medicine residency program but also assisted with SAUSHEC-wide QI/PS projects...
March 2017: Military Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28259605/hands-on-physics-education-of-residents-in-diagnostic-radiology
#2
Jie Zhang, Peter A Hardy, David J DiSantis, M Elizabeth Oates
RATIONALE AND OBJECTIVES: The American Board of Radiology Core Examination integrates assessment of physics knowledge into its overall testing of clinical radiology, with an emphasis on understanding image quality and artifacts, radiation dose, and patient safety for each modality or subspecialty organ system. Accordingly, achieving a holistic approach to physics education of radiology residents is a huge challenge. The traditional teaching of radiological physics-simply through didactic lectures-was not designed for such a holistic approach...
March 1, 2017: Academic Radiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28157394/how-well-prepared-are-medical-and-nursing-students-to-identify-common-hazards-in-the-icu
#3
Alison S Clay, Saumil M Chudgar, Kathleen M Turner, Jacqueline Vaughn, Nancy W Knudsen, Jeanne M Farnan, Vineet M Arora, Margory A Molloy
RATIONALE: Care in the hospital is hazardous. Harm in the hospital may prolong hospitalization, increase suffering, result in death, and increase costs of care. While the interprofessional team is critical to eliminating hazards that may result in adverse events to patients, professional students' formal education may not prepare students adequately for this role. OBJECTIVES: To determine if medical and nursing students can identify hazards of hospitalization that could result in harm to patients and to detect differences between professions in the types of hazards identified...
February 3, 2017: Annals of the American Thoracic Society
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28141697/making-residents-part-of-the-safety-culture-improving-error-reporting-and-reducing-harms
#4
Michael D Fox, Gregory M Bump, Gabriella A Butler, Ling-Wan Chen, Andrew R Buchert
OBJECTIVES: Reporting medical errors is a focus of the patient safety movement. As frontline physicians, residents are optimally positioned to recognize errors and flaws in systems of care. Previous work highlights the difficulty of engaging residents in identification and/or reduction of medical errors and in integrating these trainees into their institutions' cultures of safety. METHODS: The authors describe the implementation of a longitudinal, discipline-based, multifaceted curriculum to enhance the reporting of errors by pediatric residents at Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh of University of Pittsburgh Medical Center...
January 30, 2017: Journal of Patient Safety
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28121655/engaging-learners-in-health-system-quality-improvement-efforts
#5
Karnjit Johl, R Kevin Grigsby
In 1999, an Institute of Medicine report spurred health care organizations to implement systems-based quality improvement efforts and tackle patient safety. Simultaneously, the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education asked residency programs to address Practice-Based Learning and Systems-Based Practice competencies. Medical educators now advocate incorporation of these competencies in undergraduate medical education.The authors examine the success of these efforts both from the health care delivery and systems perspective as well as from the perspective of educators as they aspire to engage medical students and residents in these domains...
January 24, 2017: Academic Medicine: Journal of the Association of American Medical Colleges
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28116028/characteristics-of-real-time-non-critical-incident-debriefing-practices-in-the-emergency-department
#6
Nur-Ain Nadir, Suzanne Bentley, Dimitrios Papanagnou, Komal Bajaj, Stephan Rinnert, Richard Sinert
INTRODUCTION: Benefits of post-simulation debriefings as an educational and feedback tool have been widely accepted for nearly a decade. Real-time, non-critical incident debriefing is similar to post-simulation debriefing; however, data on its practice in academic emergency departments (ED), is limited. Although tools such as TeamSTEPPS® (Team Strategies and Tools to Enhance Performance and Patient Safety) suggest debriefing after complicated medical situations, they do not teach debriefing skills suited to this purpose...
January 2017: Western Journal of Emergency Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28100176/effect-of-training-and-structured-medication-review-on-medication-appropriateness-in-nursing-home-residents-and-on-cooperation-between-health-care-professionals-the-intherakt-study-protocol
#7
Angelika Mahlknecht, Nadja Nestler, Ulrike Bauer, Nadine Schüßler, Jochen Schuler, Sebastian Scharer, Ralf Becker, Isabel Waltering, Georg Hempel, Oliver Schwalbe, Maria Flamm, Jürgen Osterbrink
BACKGROUND: Pharmacotherapy in residents of nursing homes is critical due to the special vulnerability of this population. Medical care and interprofessional communication in nursing homes are often uncoordinated. As a consequence, polypharmacy and inappropriate medication use are common and may lead to hospitalizations and health hazards. The aim of this study is to optimize communication between the involved professional groups by specific training and by establishing a structured medication review process, and to improve medication appropriateness and patient-relevant health outcomes for residents of nursing homes...
January 18, 2017: BMC Geriatrics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28090509/innovations-in-surgery-simulation-a-review-of-past-current-and-future-techniques
#8
REVIEW
Ido Badash, Karen Burtt, Carlos A Solorzano, Joseph N Carey
As a result of recent work-hours limitations and concerns for patient safety, innovations in extraclinical surgical simulation have become a desired part of residency education. Current simulation models, including cadaveric, animal, bench-top, virtual reality (VR) and robotic simulators are increasingly used in surgical training programs. Advances in telesurgery, three-dimensional (3D) printing, and the incorporation of patient-specific anatomy are paving the way for simulators to become integral components of medical training in the future...
December 2016: Annals of Translational Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28046464/su-d-201-07-a-survey-of-radiation-oncology-residents-training-and-preparedness-to-lead-patient-safety-programs-in-clinics
#9
M Spraker, M Nyflot, E Ford, G Kane, J Zeng, K Hendrickson
PURPOSE: Safety and quality has garnered increased attention in radiation oncology, and physicians and physicists are ideal leaders of clinical patient safety programs. However, it is not clear whether residency programs incorporate formal patient safety training and adequately equip residents to assume this leadership role. A national survey was conducted to evaluate medical and physics residents' exposure to safety topics and their confidence with the skills required to lead clinical safety programs...
June 2016: Medical Physics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28025061/understanding-resident-performance-mindfulness-and-communication-in-critical-care-rotations
#10
Kevin Real, Katelyn Fields-Elswick, Andrew C Bernard
OBJECTIVE: Evidence from the medical literature suggests that surgical trainees can benefit from mindful practices. Surgical educators are challenged with the need to address resident core competencies, some of which may be facilitated by higher levels of mindfulness. This study explores whether mindful residents perform better than their peers as members of the health care team. DESIGN: This study employed a multiphase, multimethod design to assess resident mindfulness, communication, and clinical performance...
December 23, 2016: Journal of Surgical Education
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28018556/what-is-known-examining-the-empirical-literature-in-resident-work-hours-using-30-influential-articles
#11
REVIEW
Ingrid Philibert
BACKGROUND : Examining influential, highly cited articles can show the advancement of knowledge about the effect of resident physicians' long work hours, as well as the benefits and drawbacks of work hour limits. OBJECTIVE : A narrative review of 30 articles, selected for their contribution to the literature, explored outcomes of interest in the research on work hours-including patient safety, learning, and resident well-being. METHODS : Articles were selected from a comprehensive review...
December 2016: Journal of Graduate Medical Education
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28018534/does-psychological-safety-impact-the-clinical-learning-environment-for-resident-physicians-results-from-the-va-s-learners-perceptions-survey
#12
Karina D Torralba, Lawrence K Loo, John M Byrne, Samuel Baz, Grant W Cannon, Sheri A Keitz, Annie B Wicker, Steven S Henley, T Michael Kashner
BACKGROUND : Psychological safety (PS) is the perception that it is safe to take interpersonal risks in the work environment. In teaching hospitals, PS may influence the clinical learning environment for trainees. OBJECTIVE : We assessed whether resident physicians believe they are psychologically safe, and if PS is associated with how they rate satisfaction with their clinical learning experience. METHODS : Data were extracted from the Learners' Perceptions Survey (LPS) of residents who rotated through a Department of Veterans Affairs health care facility for academic years 2011-2014...
December 2016: Journal of Graduate Medical Education
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28012676/residents-perception-of-duty-hour-limits-through-teaching-hospital-accreditation-status-experience-in-taiwan
#13
Tsung-Hsi Wang, Brian C Drolet, Kun-Yu Tsai, Yu-Fu Liu
Residents' work overload is a rising issue in Taiwan. Duty hours of the residents in the United States have been limited by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education Common Program Requirements since 2003; similar standards were not implemented in Taiwan until 2013. Taiwanese duty hour standards are the work hour limits adopted as part of the required teaching hospital accreditation status. In January 2015, the Ministry of Health and Welfare conducted a national survey for all house officers in Taiwan...
December 21, 2016: Journal of the Formosan Medical Association, Taiwan Yi Zhi
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27903769/education-for-the-next-frontier-in-patient-safety-a-longitudinal-resident-curriculum-on-diagnostic-error
#14
Emily Ruedinger, Maren Olson, Justin Yee, Emily Borman-Shoap, Andrew P J Olson
Diagnostic error is a common, serious problem that has received increased attention recently for its impact on both patients and providers. Presently, most graduate medical education programs do not formally address this topic. The authors developed and evaluated a longitudinal, multimodule resident curriculum about diagnostic error and medical decision making. Key components of the curriculum include demystifying the medical decision-making process, building skills in critical thinking, and providing strategies for diagnostic error mitigation...
November 29, 2016: American Journal of Medical Quality: the Official Journal of the American College of Medical Quality
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27844476/coprescribing-naloxone-for-patients-on-chronic-opioid-therapy-les-sons-learned-from-a-patient-safety-initiative-in-primary-care-training-sites
#15
William Delaney, Jessica Huff, Sandra Mini, Aiswarya Thomas, Ralph Tremaglio
OBJECTIVE: To describe the development and implementation of a resident-led effort to increase coprescription of naloxone in a primary care setting. DESIGN: An exploratory, prospective pilot project to increase coprescription rates of naloxone. SETTING: Four primary care offices in western Connecticut serving as medical home training sites for primary care residents. PATIENTS, PARTICIPANTS: All patients on chronic opioid therapy...
September 2016: Journal of Opioid Management
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27815055/strengths-and-deficiencies-in-the-content%C3%A2-of-us-radiology-private-practices-%C3%A2-websites
#16
Evan J Johnson, Ankur M Doshi, Andrew B Rosenkrantz
PURPOSE: The Internet provides a potentially valuable mechanism for radiology practices to communicate with patients and enhance the patient experience. The aim of this study was to assess the websites of US radiology private practices, with attention to the frequency of content of potential patient interest. METHODS: The 50 largest private practice radiology facilities in the United States were identified from RadiologyBusiness.com. Websites were reviewed for information content and functionality...
March 2017: Journal of the American College of Radiology: JACR
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27796919/accrediting-graduate-medical-education-in-psychiatry-past-present-and-future
#17
REVIEW
Toni Johnson, Nadyah Janine John, Michael Lang, P G Shelton
The current terminology, goals, and general competency framework systematically utilized in the education of residents regardless of specialty is almost unrecognizable and quite foreign to those who trained before 2010. For example, the clinical and professional expectations for physicians-in-training have been placed onto a developmental framework of milestones. The expectations required during training have been expanded to include leadership and team participation skills, proficiency in the use of information technology, systems-based knowledge including respect of resources and cost of care, patient safety, quality improvement, population health and sensitivity to diversity for both individual and populations of patients...
October 28, 2016: Psychiatric Quarterly
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27769319/canadian-ophthalmic-microsurgery-course-an-innovative-spin-on-wet-lab-based-surgical-education
#18
Eddie Y Liu, Bo Li, Cindy M L Hutnik
Wet lab and surgical simulation can reduce the learning curve of difficult surgical techniques, accelerate the rate for trainees to achieve surgical competency, and improve patient safety. To provide the most up-to-date information and hands-on experiences with novel ophthalmic surgical techniques and instruments, the Department of Ophthalmology at Western University has created a wet lab-based, multilevel microsurgery skills transfer course through collaboration with various industry partners. Several elements in the course goal and design differentiate this type of surgical course from typical wet labs: the format is multileveled surgical training, with a beginner level targeting undergraduate medical students, an intermediate level for ophthalmology residents, and an advanced level for trained ophthalmologist...
October 2016: Canadian Journal of Ophthalmology. Journal Canadien D'ophtalmologie
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27768160/integrating-morbidity-and-mortality-core-competencies-and-quality-improvement-in-otolaryngology
#19
Adrienne M Laury, Sarah N Bowe, Joshua Lospinoso
Importance: To date, an otolaryngology-specific morbidity and mortality (M&M) conference has never been reported or evaluated. Objective: To propose a novel otolaryngology-specific M&M format and to assess its success using a validated assessment tool. Design, Setting, and Participants: Preintervention and postintervention cohort study spanning 14 months (September 2014 to November 2015), with 32 faculty, residents, and medical students attending the department of otolaryngology M&M conference, conducted at the the San Antonio Uniformed Services Health Education Consortium...
February 1, 2017: JAMA Otolaryngology—Head & Neck Surgery
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27733666/the-impacts-of-a-pharmacist-managed-outpatient-clinic-and-chemotherapy-directed-electronic-order-sets-for-monitoring-oral-chemotherapy
#20
Brandon Battis, Linda Clifford, Mostaqul Huq, Edrick Pejoro, Scott Mambourg
OBJECTIVES: Patients treated with oral chemotherapy appear to have less contact with the treating providers. As a result, safety, adherence, medication therapy monitoring, and timely follow-up may be compromised. The trend of treating cancer with oral chemotherapy agents is on the rise. However, standard clinical guidance is still lacking for prescribing, monitoring, patient education, and follow-up of patients on oral chemotherapy across the healthcare settings. The purpose of this project is to establish an oral chemotherapy monitoring clinic, to create drug and lab specific provider order sets for prescribing and lab monitoring, and ultimately to ensure safe and effective treatment of the veterans we serve...
October 12, 2016: Journal of Oncology Pharmacy Practice
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