keyword
MENU ▼
Read by QxMD icon Read
search

medical education residents patient safety

keyword
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29686769/residents-ratings-of-their-clinical-supervision-and-their-self-reported-medical-errors-analysis-of-data-from-2009
#1
DeWitt C Baldwin, Steven R Daugherty, Patrick M Ryan, Nicholas A Yaghmour, Ingrid Philibert
Background : Medical errors and patient safety are major concerns for the medical and medical education communities. Improving clinical supervision for residents is important in avoiding errors, yet little is known about how residents perceive the adequacy of their supervision and how this relates to medical errors and other education outcomes, such as learning and satisfaction. Methods : We analyzed data from a 2009 survey of residents in 4 large specialties regarding the adequacy and quality of supervision they receive as well as associations with self-reported data on medical errors and residents' perceptions of their learning environment...
April 2018: Journal of Graduate Medical Education
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29681631/management-of-medical-care-a-fundamental-tool-for-resident-doctors
#2
Guillermo Fajardo-Ortiz, Héctor Robledo
In the area of medical education, and particularly in our country, medical residencies are the best educational programs for a graduated physicians; however, when young medical doctors begin a residence at hospitals, they hardly poses knowledge about the way medical services work as well as the processes they involve, which directly affects the fulfillment of their tasks, their process of learning and more importantly, it interferes in the services provided by the hospital. Therefore, it is imperative to immerse residents in the management of medical care and let them know that its main function is to harmoniously articulate every medical-administrative process related to patients as well as human, material and financial resources...
2018: Cirugia y Cirujanos
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29672526/structured-patient-handoff-on-an-internal-medicine-ward-a-cluster-randomized-control-trial
#3
Penny Tam, Aman P Nijjar, Mark Fok, Chris Little, Alexandra Shingina, Jesse Bittman, Rashmi Raghavan, Nadia A Khan
BACKGROUND: The effect of a multi-faceted handoff strategy in a high volume internal medicine inpatient setting on process and patient outcomes has not been clearly established. We set out to determine if a multi-faceted handoff intervention consisting of education, standardized handoff procedures, including fixed time and location for face-to-face handoff would result in improved rates of handoff compared with usual practice. We also evaluated resident satisfaction, health resource utilization and clinical outcomes...
2018: PloS One
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29655618/concurrent-surgery-and-the-role-of-the-pediatric-attending-surgeon-comparing-parents-and-surgeons-expectations
#4
Jennie K Choe, Christopher Ibarra, Richard S Feinn, Manuel I Rodriguez-Davalos, Cordelia W Carter
BACKGROUND: The common practice of performing concurrent or overlapping surgeries has been intensely scrutinized by lay media and academic press to investigate its safety and cost-effectiveness. However, there is little information about its use within the pediatric population. Even less is known about parents' expectations regarding the surgeon's role on the day of surgery and how they align with those of pediatric surgeons and surgical trainees, despite the potential for significant discrepancies in expectations to erode trust and damage the physician-family relationship...
April 12, 2018: Journal of the American College of Surgeons
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29613919/addressing-dual-patient-and-staff-safety-through-a-team-based-standardized-patient-simulation-for-agitation-management-in-the-emergency-department
#5
Ambrose H Wong, Marc A Auerbach, Halley Ruppel, Lauren J Crispino, Alana Rosenberg, Joanne D Iennaco, Federico E Vaca
INTRODUCTION: Emergency departments (EDs) have seen harm rise for both patients and health workers from an increasing rate of agitation events. Team effectiveness during care of this population is particularly challenging because fear of physical harm leads to competing interests. Simulation is frequently employed to improve teamwork in medical resuscitations but has not yet been reported to address team-based behavioral emergency care. As part of a larger investigation of agitated patient care, we designed this secondary study to examine the impact of an interprofessional standardized patient simulation for ED agitation management...
April 3, 2018: Simulation in Healthcare: Journal of the Society for Simulation in Healthcare
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29606098/learning-from-errors-assessing-final-year-medical-students-reflection-on-safety-improvement-five-year-cohort-study
#6
Vicki Tully, Douglas Murphy, Evridiki Fioratou, Arun Chaudhuri, James Shaw, Peter Davey
BACKGROUND: Investigation of real incidents has been consistently identified by expert reviews and student surveys as a potentially valuable teaching resource for medical students. The aim of this study was to adapt a published method to measure resident doctors' reflection on quality improvement and evaluate this as an assessment tool for medical students. METHODS: The design is a cohort study. Medical students were prepared with a tutorial in team based learning format and an online Managing Incident Review course...
April 2, 2018: BMC Medical Education
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29587353/implementation-of-a-medication-reconciliation-process-in-an-internal-medicine-clinic-at-an-academic-medical-center
#7
Kathryn M Holt, Amy N Thompson
Discrepancies in medication orders at transitions of care have been shown to affect patient outcomes in a negative way. The Joint Commission recognizes the importance of medication reconciliation through their National Patient Safety Goals, with an emphasis placed on maintaining accurate medication information for each patient. The primary objective of this study was to assess the effectiveness of implementing a medication reconciliation process in an internal medicine clinic at an academic medical center. A retrospective chart review of patients seen at an Internal Medicine Clinic within and Academic Medical Center, a continuity and teaching clinic for Internal Medicine residents and faculty practice clinic, was conducted...
March 24, 2018: Pharmacy (Basel, Switzerland)
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29532307/implementation-and-evaluation-of-structured-nephrology-morbidity-and-mortality-conferences-a-quality-education-report
#8
Pierre Antoine Brown, Swapnil Hiremath, Edward G Clark, Edmund S H Kwok, Christopher McCudden, Ayub Akbari
BACKGROUND: Morbidity and Mortality Conferences (M&MCs) have for generations been part of the education of physicians, yet their effectiveness remains questionable. The Ottawa M&M Model (OM3) was developed to provide a structured approach to M&MCs in order to maximize the quality improvement impact of such rounds. STUDY DESIGN: We conducted a retrospective assessment of the impact of implementing nephrology-specific M&MCs using the OM3. SETTING AND PARTICIPANTS: All physicians, residents and fellows from the division of nephrology at a large academic medical center were invited to participate...
March 12, 2018: International Urology and Nephrology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29530444/technology-enhanced-simulation-improves-trainee-readiness-transitioning-to-cardiothoracic-training
#9
Patrick G Chan, Lara W Schaheen, Ernest G Chan, Chris C Cook, James D Luketich, Jonathan D'Cunha
OBJECTIVE: Transitioning from medical school and general surgery training to cardiothoracic (CT) surgical training poses unique challenges for trainees and patient care. We hypothesized that participation in technology-enhanced simulation modules that provided early exposure to urgent/emergent CT patient problems would improve cognitive skills and readiness to manage common urgencies/emergencies. DESIGN: Traditional and integrated cardiothoracic residents at our institution participated in a technology-enhanced simulation curriculum...
March 9, 2018: Journal of Surgical Education
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29528424/do-the-public-think-medical-regulation-keep-them-safe
#10
Carrie Ho-Kwan Yam, Eliza Lai-Yi Wong, Sian M Griffiths, Eng-Kiong Yeoh
Objective: To assess public knowledge and expectations of the ways to assess doctors' competence to ensure patient safety. Design setting and participants: Telephone survey of a random sample of 1000 non-institutionalized Hong Kong residents. Measures and results: Only 5% of public were correct that doctors are not required to periodically be assessed, and 9% were correct that the doctors are not required to update knowledge and skills for renewing their license...
March 1, 2018: International Journal for Quality in Health Care
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29521418/teach-the-teacher-training-otolaryngology-fellows-to-become-academic-educators
#11
John D Cramer, David H Chi, Barry M Schaitkin, David E Eibling, Jonas T Johnson
OBJECTIVES/HYPOTHESIS: Fellowship is the capstone of academic training and serves as preparation for an academic career. Fellows are expected to educate medical students and residents during and long after fellowship. However, little time is typically spent teaching fellows to become effective educators. We investigate a formal curriculum addressing teaching skills among fellows in otolaryngology-head and neck surgery (OHNS). STUDY DESIGN: E-mail survey. METHODS: We developed and implemented an educational program called Teach the Teacher to build skills as educators for fellows in OHNS...
March 9, 2018: Laryngoscope
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29485488/the-history-of-medical-education-in-europe-and-the-united-states-with-respect-to-time-and-proficiency
#12
Eugène J F M Custers, Olle Ten Cate
In this article, the authors present a historic overview of the development of medical education in the United States and Europe (in particular the Netherlands), as it relates to the issues of time (duration of the course) and proficiency (performance requirements and examinations). This overview is necessarily limited and based largely on post hoc interpretation, as historic data on time frames are not well documented and the issue of competence has only recently been addressed.During times when there were few, if any, formal regulations, physicians were primarily "learned gentlemen" in command of few effective practical skills, and the duration of education and the competencies acquired by the end of a course simply did not appear to be issues of any interest to universities or state authorities...
March 2018: Academic Medicine: Journal of the Association of American Medical Colleges
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29480888/resident-participation-is-not-associated-with-worse-outcomes-after-tka
#13
Mike H Bao, Benjamin J Keeney, Wayne E Moschetti, Nicholas G Paddock, David S Jevsevar
BACKGROUND: Approximately one-half of all US surgical procedures, and one-third of orthopaedic procedures, are performed at teaching hospitals. However, the effect of resident participation and their level of training on patient care for TKA postoperative physical function, operative time, length of stay, and facility discharge are unclear. QUESTIONS/PURPOSES: (1) Are resident participation, postgraduate year (PGY) training level, and number of residents associated with absolute postoperative Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS-10) global physical function score (PCS), and achieving minimum clinically important difference (MCID) PCS improvement, after TKA? (2) Are resident participation, PGY, and number of residents associated with increased TKA operative time? (3) Are resident participation, PGY, and number of residents associated with increased length of stay after TKA? (4) Are resident participation, PGY, and number of residents associated with higher odds of patients being discharged to another inpatient facility, rather than to their home (facility discharge)? METHODS: We performed a retrospective study using a longitudinally maintained institutional registry of TKAs that included 1626 patients at a single tertiary academic institution from April 2011 through July 2016...
February 14, 2018: Clinical Orthopaedics and related Research
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29457248/duty-hours-restriction-for-our-surgical-trainees-an-ethical-obligation-or-a-bad-idea
#14
REVIEW
Christopher A Adin, Callie A Fogle, Steven L Marks
To ensure patient safety and protect the well-being of interns and residents, the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) issued guidelines in 2003 limiting the working hours of physician trainees. Although many supported the goals of the ACGME, institutions struggled to restructure their programs and hire staff required by this unfunded mandate. Numerous studies have analyzed the effects of duty hours restrictions on patient outcomes and physician training over the past 15 years. Most agree that duty hours restrictions improved well-being of house officers, but these improvements came at the expense of continuity, and patient hand-offs led to medical errors...
February 19, 2018: Veterinary Surgery: VS
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29399852/effects-of-training-physicians-in-electronic-prescribing-in-the-outpatient-setting-on-clinical-learning-and-behavioural-outcomes-a-cluster-randomized-trial
#15
F van Stiphout, J E F Zwart-van Rijkom, J Versmissen, H Koffijberg, J E C M Aarts, I H van der Sijs, T van Gelder, R A de Man, C B Roes, A C G Egberts, E W M T Ter Braak
AIMS: Electronic prescribing systems may improve medication safety, but only when used appropriately. Effects of a task-analysis based training were evaluated in the outpatient setting on clinical, learning and behavioral outcomes, compared with usual educational approach. METHODS: Multicenter, cluster-randomized trial (MEDUCATE trial) with physicians as unit of analysis. SETTING: Outpatient clinics of two academic hospitals. PARTICIPANTS: Specialist and residents of internal medicine and their patients...
February 4, 2018: British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29383073/using-medical-student-quality-improvement-projects-to-promote-evidence-based-care-in-the-emergency-department
#16
Michael W Manning, Eric W Bean, Andrew C Miller, Suzanne J Templer, Richard S Mackenzie, David M Richardson, Kristin A Bresnan, Marna R Greenberg
Introduction: The Association of American Medical Colleges' (AAMC) initiative for Core Entrustable Professional Activities for Entering Residency includes as an element of Entrustable Professional Activity 13 to "identify system failures and contribute to a culture of safety and improvement." We set out to determine the feasibility of using medical students' action learning projects (ALPs) to expedite implementation of evidence-based pathways for three common patient diagnoses in the emergency department (ED) setting (Atrial fibrillation, congestive heart failure, and pulmonary embolism)...
January 2018: Western Journal of Emergency Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29383056/acgme-clinical-and-educational-work-hour-standards-perspectives-and-recommendations-from-emergency-medicine-educators
#17
Stephen J Wolf, Saadia Akhtar, Eric Gross, David Barnes, Michael Epter, Jonathan Fisher, Maria Moreira, Michael Smith, Hans House
Introduction: The American College of Emergency Physicians (ACEP) and the Council of Emergency Medicine Residency Directors (CORD) were invited to contribute to the 2016 Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education's (ACGME) Second Resident Duty Hours in the Learning and Working Environment Congress . We describe the joint process used by ACEP and CORD to capture the opinions of emergency medicine (EM) educators on the ACGME clinical and educational work hour standards, formulate recommendations, and inform subsequent congressional testimony...
January 2018: Western Journal of Emergency Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29377731/there-s-a-lot-more-to-being-a-physician-insights-from-an-intensive-clinical-shadowing-experience-in-internal-medicine
#18
Lauren Block, Kevin Wang, Catherine C Gao, Albert W Wu, Leonard S Feldman
Phenomenon: Although most premedical students shadow physicians prior to starting medical school, there is no set of guidelines or expectations to facilitate effective experiences for students and physicians, nor is there data on the value of shadowing medical trainees as a way to learn about the training environment. We sought to understand premedical student perspectives on an intensive resident shadowing experience. APPROACH: This was a qualitative study using anonymous data from focus groups conducted with premedical student participants in a month-long time motion analysis of internal medicine interns at two large academic medical centers...
January 29, 2018: Teaching and Learning in Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29290595/the-media-response-to-the-acgme-s-2017-relaxed-resident-duty-hour-restrictions
#19
Zi Zhang, Alan V Krauthamer, Andrew B Rosenkrantz
PURPOSE: In March 2017, the ACGME relaxed resident duty-hour restrictions to allow first-year residents to work 24-hour shifts, affecting the internship experience of incoming radiology residents. The aim of this study was to assess the media response to this duty-hour change, comparing news articles with favorable and unfavorable views. METHODS: Google News was used to identify 36 relevant unique news articles published over a 4-week period after the announcement...
March 2018: Journal of the American College of Radiology: JACR
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29288642/improving-staff-communication-and-transitions-of-care-between-obstetric-triage-and-labor-and-delivery
#20
Kathleen O'Rourke, Joseph Teel, Erika Nicholls, Daniel D Lee, Alyssa Covelli Colwill, Sindhu K Srinivas
OBJECTIVE: To improve staff perception of the quality of the patient admission process from obstetric triage to the labor and delivery unit through standardization. DESIGN: Preassessment and postassessment online surveys. SETTING: A 13-bed labor and delivery unit in a quaternary care, Magnet Recognition Program, academic medical center in Pennsylvania. PARTICIPANTS: Preintervention (n = 100), postintervention (n = 52), and 6-month follow-up survey respondents (n = 75) represented secretaries, registered nurses, surgical technicians, certified nurse-midwives, nurse practitioners, maternal-fetal medicine fellows, anesthesiologists, and obstetric and family medicine attending and resident physicians from triage and labor and delivery units...
March 2018: Journal of Obstetric, Gynecologic, and Neonatal Nursing: JOGNN
keyword
keyword
62623
1
2
Fetch more papers »
Fetching more papers... Fetching...
Read by QxMD. Sign in or create an account to discover new knowledge that matter to you.
Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read
×

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"