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tarsal tunnel syndrome

Sang Hyun Nam, Jung Yeon Kim, Jaeki Ahn, Yongbum Park
Plexiform neurofibromas of the foot are rare, benign tumors of the peripheral nerves. Diagnosis can be challenging if they present with symptoms mimicking other peripheral nerve pathologies. Tarsal tunnel syndrome is an entrapment syndrome of the entire tibial nerve behind the medial malleolus and under the flexor retinaculum. The clinical presentation typically includes posteromedial pain, positive Tinel's sign, and neurogenic signs, including both the sensation of numbness and the actual hypoesthesia and clawing of the toes...
January 2018: The surgery journal
Kenya Watanabe, Takuma Fukuzawa, Katsuhiro Mitsui
Schwannoma is the most common tumor of the peripheral nerve sheath. However, there have been few reports on schwannoma of the posterior tibial nerve causing tarsal tunnel syndrome. We report on a 60-year-old man with tarsal tunnel syndrome caused by a schwannoma of the posterior tibial nerve, which was first diagnosed as a ganglion cyst. After enucleation of this tumor, the patient was asymptomatic and had no related sequelae except for minor numbness in the plantar aspects of his digits. Although schwannoma of the posterior tibial nerve is rare, it should be considered even if a ganglion is clinically suspected...
February 2018: Acta Medica Okayama
Cody J Mansfield, Jake Bleacher, Paul Tadak, Matthew S Briggs
Background: The diagnosis of chronic exertional compartment syndrome can be challenging as other pathologies involving bone, muscle, nerve and vascular structures can mimic the syndrome. The purpose of this Fellow's Case Problem is to describe the clinical decision-making and physical therapy differential diagnosis regarding a 25-year-old patient with un-resolved neurovascular complaints following chronic exertional compartment syndrome surgical release. Diagnosis: After surgery, the patient's previous complaint of numbness and tingling in the plantar surfaces of her first and second toes of right foot was still present...
December 2017: Journal of Manual & Manipulative Therapy
Juntaro Matsumoto, Toyohiko Isu, Kyongsong Kim, Naotaka Iwamoto, Kazuyoshi Yamazaki, Daijiro Morimoto, Masanori Isobe
INTRODUCTION: Some patients suffer failed back surgery syndrome (FBSS) after lumbar spine surgery. We report the effect of additional treatments for para-lumbar- and peripheral nerve diseases addressing residual symptoms after lumbar spine surgery. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We enrolled 74 patients (59 men and 15 women, mean age 62.9 years) who had undergone lumbar posterior decompression surgery in our department. Mean follow-up after initial lumbar surgery was 26...
January 31, 2018: World Neurosurgery
Priscilla Tu
The differential diagnosis of heel pain is extensive, but a mechanical etiology is the most common. The specific anatomic location of the pain can help guide diagnosis. The most common diagnosis is plantar fasciitis, which leads to medial plantar heel pain, especially with the first weight-bearing steps after rest. Other causes of plantar heel pain include calcaneal stress fractures (progressively worsening pain after an increase in activity or change to a harder walking surface), nerve entrapment or neuroma (pain accompanied by burning, tingling, or numbness), heel pad syndrome (deep, bruise-like pain in the middle of the heel), and plantar warts...
January 15, 2018: American Family Physician
Michinori Nariai, Kyongsong Kim, Masaaki Kawauchi, Akihiro Ishii, Misa Kido, Toyohiko Isu, Rinko Kokubo, Daijiro Morimoto, Naotaka Iwamoto, Akio Morita
BACKGROUND: Tarsal tunnel syndrome(TTS)is an entrapment neuropathy of the posterior tibial nerve within the tarsal tunnel below the medial malleolus. An accurate diagnosis is difficult, and TTS is usually diagnosed from clinical symptoms due to the lack of accurate diagnostic tools. We aimed to standardize the diagnosis of TTS using MRI, and report the MRI conditions for clear visualization of the tarsal tunnel. METHODS: We investigated which sequences and MRI conditions would be appropriate for the imaging of the tarsal tunnel in a healthy volunteer...
January 2018: No Shinkei Geka. Neurological Surgery
Marcus Schiltenwolf, Peter W Gaidzik
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
January 11, 2018: Der Orthop├Ąde
Swathi, Geetha Gangadaran Nellithala, Sunita Arvind Athavale
Retinacula are thickenings of deep fascia in the region of joints that hold down the tendons preventing them from bowing out of position. In the region of ankle, number of such retinacula have been described. Retinacula like superior and inferior extensor retinacula have been described which hold down the tendons of leg muscles passing to the foot beneath them. As the extensor tendons of the leg have more distal attachment to the toes, the present study was conducted to ascertain the presence of any additional retinaculum in the mid-foot region, which would tie down the tendons for their effective action at the distal joints...
September 2017: Anatomy & Cell Biology
Anil K Bhat, Sandesh Madi, Prajwal Prabhudev Mane, Ashwath Acharya
Tarsal tunnel syndrome (TTS) is one of the frequently encountered entrapment neuropathies of the lower limb. Most often the aetiology is considered to be idiopathic. However, it has to be thoroughly investigated to rule out diverse extrinsic and intrinsic causes. The sustentaculum tali (ST) forms the superior part of the distal tarsal tunnel, and any increase in its size may result in irritation of the tibial nerve or its branches, the medial and lateral plantar nerves or decrease the overall volume of the tarsal tunnel culminating to clinical features of TTS...
September 7, 2017: BMJ Case Reports
David Jaffe, David Vier, Justin Kane, Michal Kozanek, Christian Royer
BACKGROUND: Calcaneal osteotomies are commonly used to correct varus hindfoot alignment in patients with symptomatic cavovarus deformity. Translational, closing wedge, and Malerba-type osteotomies have been implicated in the development of tarsal tunnel syndrome and neurologic injury to branches of the tibial nerve. The authors hypothesized that there would be minimal clinically important injury to the tibial nerve by performing a translational calcaneal osteotomy from a medial approach...
December 2017: Foot & Ankle International
Jonathan A Isbell, Andrew C Morris, Ibukunoluwa Araoye, Sameer Naranje, Ashish B Shah
INTRODUCTION: Synovial chondromatosis is a rare, benign monoarticular condition characterized by the metaplastic formation of cartilaginous nodules from the synovium of joints (intra-articular), tendons and bursae (extra-articular). These nodules have the potential to detach and form loose bodies within the joint space. The most common locations are the large joints such as the knees, hips, elbows, and shoulders, with less common locations being the foot and ankle joints. Synovial chondromatosis primarily occurs in men between the third and fifth decades of life, and it typically presents as chronic joint pain with swelling, decreased joint range of motion, and osteoarthritis...
March 2017: Journal of Orthopaedic Case Reports
Pietro Emiliano Doneddu, Daniele Coraci, Claudia Loreti, Giulia Piccinini, Luca Padua
Tarsal tunnel syndrome is an entrapment neuropathy of the posterior tibial nerve or its terminal branches within its fibro-osseous tunnel beneath the flexor retinaculum on the medial side of the ankle. The condition is frequently underdiagnosed leading to controversies regarding its epidemiology and to an intense debate in the literature. With the advent of nerve imaging techniques, the diagnostic confirmation and the etiological identification have become more accurate. However, management of this entrapment neuropathy remains challenging because of many intervention strategies but limited robust evidence...
October 2017: Neurological Sciences
Azusa Yoneda, Kazuya Sugimoto, Naoki Tsukada, Kensuke Okamura, Shinji Isomoto, Norihiro Samoto, Yasuhito Tanaka
Glomus tumors are painful benign neoplasms. They commonly present in the hand and are mostly solitary lesions. We report a rare case of multiple glomus tumors in the lower leg. Moreover, 1 of the tumors was in the tarsal tunnel. Resection of the tumors resulted in the early diagnosis of glomus tumors and complete symptom relief. Because of its rarity, diagnosing an extradigital glomus tumor is difficult. Recognition of glomus tumors allows for an early diagnosis and resection, and preoperative magnetic resonance imaging helps in the detection of multiple lesions...
July 2017: Journal of Foot and Ankle Surgery: Official Publication of the American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons
Makgabo John Tladi, Nikiforos Pandelis Saragas, Paulo Norberto Ferrao, Andrew Strydom
We present two case reports of peripheral nerve tumors (schwannoma and neurofibroma) that presented as tarsal tunnel syndrome for many years. There has never been a report of multiple neurofibroma of the posterior tibial nerve presenting as a tarsal tunnel syndrome. Both patients were treated surgically with good outcomes.
August 2017: Foot
Kohei Morinaga, Taro Shimizu
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
October 2017: American Journal of Medicine
H Mufty, G A Matricali, S Thomis
Painful tarsal tunnel syndrome is a compression neuropathy with a variety of possible sources. As it presents a challenging differential diagnostic problem, it is often under-diagnosed. Among the intrinsic and extrinsic factors, varicose veins are the main source in case of a venous etiology. We report a case of a 39-year old male patient who presented with complaints of paresthesia and excessive pain of the right foot, especially the medial side. Further work up by ultrasonography, magnetic resonance imaging and electromyography revealed an extensive congenital venous malformation of the right lower limb with subsequent compression of the tibial nerve in the tarsal tunnel...
April 28, 2017: Acta Chirurgica Belgica
Tun Hing Lui
The tarsal tunnel ganglion is a cause of posterior tarsal tunnel syndrome. Open resection of the ganglion calls for release of the flexor retinaculum and dissection around the tibial neurovascular bundle. This can induce fibrosis around the tibial nerve. We report the technique of endoscopic resection of the tarsal tunnel ganglion. It is indicated for tarsal tunnel ganglia arising from the adjacent joints or tendon sheaths and compressing the tibial nerve from its deep side. It is contraindicated if there is other pathology of the tarsal tunnel that demands open surgery; if the ganglion compresses the tibial nerve from its superficial side, which calls for a different endoscopic approach using the ganglion portal; or if an intraneural ganglion of the tibial nerve is present...
October 2016: Arthroscopy Techniques
Motohisa Kawakatsu, Toshihiro Ishiko, Masafumi Sumiya
A 52-year-old male complained of numbness and radiating pain affecting the plantar region of his left foot. He was found to have recurrent tarsal tunnel syndrome due to posterior tibial nerve compression by 3 different types of ganglion during a 12-year period. To the best of our knowledge, a similar case has not been documented. At the first operation, flexor retinaculum release and simple excision of an epineural ganglion were performed without injuring the nerve fascicles; however, an intrafascicular ganglion developed approximately 2 years later...
March 2017: Journal of Foot and Ankle Surgery: Official Publication of the American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons
Jae Hoon Lee, Young Jun Kim, Jong Hun Baek, Dong Hee Kim
PURPOSES: To review the outcome of Z-plasty of the flexor hallucis longus (FHL) tendon at the tarsal tunnel for checkrein deformity in 8 patients. METHODS: Records of 6 males and 2 females aged 14 to 67 (mean, 39.5) years who underwent Z-plasty (lengthening) of the FHL tendon at the tarsal tunnel for checkrein deformity in the first and second toes by a single surgeon were reviewed. All patients had undergone 3 months of conservative treatment. The mean time from injury to surgical treatment was 8...
December 2016: Journal of Orthopaedic Surgery
Rinko Kokubo, Kyongsong Kim, Toyohiko Isu, Daijiro Morimoto, Naotaka Iwamoto, Shiro Kobayashi, Akio Morita
OBJECTIVE: In the very elderly, their general condition and poor compliance with drug regimens can render the treatment of low back pain (LBP) difficult. We report the effectiveness of a less-invasive treatment for intractable LBP from superior cluneal nerve entrapment neuropathy (SCN-EN) and gluteus medius muscle (GMeM) pain. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Between April 2013 and March 2015, we treated 17 consecutive elders with LBP, buttock pain, and leg pain. They were 4 men and 13 women ranging in age from 85 to 91 years (mean 86...
February 2017: World Neurosurgery
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