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"Memory dysfunction"

Deborah Wearne, Amanda Genetti, Sam Restifo, Alina Harriss
OBJECTIVES: We aim to explore the importance of early diagnosis of dementia with Lewy bodies in order to facilitate effective psychiatric management. We present a case where delayed diagnosis stemming from an atypical presentation illustrates the complex issues involved in identifying and treating this type of dementia. CONCLUSIONS: We discuss the difficulty of diagnosis of this disorder in the absence of obvious memory dysfunction or parkinsonian symptoms. We use the case to draw attention to the limited availability of certain investigations and treatment options in Australia...
March 1, 2018: Australasian Psychiatry: Bulletin of Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists
John Noel M Viaña, Frederic Gilbert
Memory dysfunction and cognitive impairments due to Alzheimer's disease can affect the selfhood and identity of afflicted individuals, causing distress to both people with Alzheimer's disease and their caregivers. Recently, a number of case studies and clinical trials have been conducted to determine the potential of deep brain stimulation as a therapeutic modality for people with Alzheimer's disease. Some of these studies have shown that deep brain stimulation could induce flashbacks and stabilize or even improve memory...
January 1, 2018: Dementia
Véronique Deroche-Gamonet, Jean-Michel Revest, Jean-François Fiancette, Eric Balado, Muriel Koehl, Noëlle Grosjean, Djoher Nora Abrous, Pier-Vincenzo Piazza
The hippocampus is the main locus for adult dentate gyrus (DG) neurogenesis. A number of studies have shown that aberrant DG neurogenesis correlates with many neuropsychiatric disorders, including drug addiction. Although clear causal relationships have been established between DG neurogenesis and memory dysfunction or mood-related disorders, evidence of the causal role of DG neurogenesis in drug-seeking behaviors has not been established. Here we assessed the role of new DG neurons in cocaine self-administration using an inducible transgenic approach that selectively depletes adult DG neurogenesis...
March 5, 2018: Molecular Psychiatry
Kartik T Nakhate, Ashish P Bharne, Vinay Sagar Verma, Deepali N Aru, Dadasaheb M Kokare
Although plumbagin (5-hydroxy-2-methyl-1,4-naphthoquinone) protects against cerebral ischemia and spinal cord injury-induced oxidative stress and inflammation by activating the nuclear factor-erythroid 2-related factor-2 /antioxidant response element (Nrf2/ARE) pathway, its role in the amelioration of neurodegenerative diseases remains unexplored. In the present study, we investigated the effect of plumbagin on Alzheimer's disease (AD)-like condition in mice. The animals were treated intracerebroventricularly with streptozotocin (STZ; 3 mg/kg) twice, on day 1 and 3, to induce AD-like condition, and the symptoms were evaluated after 14 days...
February 28, 2018: Biomedicine & Pharmacotherapy, Biomédecine & Pharmacothérapie
Xu Chu, Shuhu Zhou, Ran Sun, Lin Wang, Chunye Xing, Ruqing Liang, Qingxia Kong
Patients with diabetes mellitus are easy to experience diabetic encephalopathy (DE) and other cognition dysfunction, whereas the neural alterations in developing this disease are unknown yet. Chrysophanol (CHR) is one of traditional Chinese medicine which was reported to show protective effects in cognition dysfunction and inflammatory in previously studies. In this current study, whether CHR protects learning and memory dysfunctions induced by diabetes disease or not and underlying mechanisms were studied...
March 1, 2018: Neurochemical Research
Anwesha Mandal, Kedar S Prabhavalkar, Lokesh K Bhatt
The connection between the gastrointestinal hormones and the brain has been established many years ago. This relation is termed the gut-brain axis (GBA). The GBA is a bidirectional communication which not only regulates gastrointestinal homeostasis but is also linked with higher emotional and cognitive functions. Hypothalamus plays a critical role in the regulation of energy metabolism, nutrient partitioning and control of feeding behaviors. Various gut hormones are released inside the gastrointestinal tract on food intake...
February 18, 2018: Peptides
Orsolya Györfi, Helga Nagy, Magdolna Bokor, Szabolcs Kéri
The link between the hippocampus and declarative memory dysfunctions following the removal of the medial temporal lobe opened unexplored fields in neuroscience. In the first part of our review, we summarized current theoretical frameworks discussing the role of hippocampus in learning and memory. Several theories are highlighted suggesting that the hippocampus is responsible for assembling stimulus elements into a unitary representation that later can be utilized to simulate future events. The hippocampal formation has been implicated in a growing number of disorders, from neurodegenerative diseases to atypical cognitive ageing and depression...
January 30, 2018: Ideggyógyászati Szemle
Wei Zhu, Yufeng Gao, Jieru Wan, Xi Lan, Xiaoning Han, Shanshan Zhu, Weidong Zang, Xuemei Chen, Wendy Ziai, Daniel F Hanley, Scott J Russo, Ricardo E Jorge, Jian Wang
Intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) is a detrimental type of stroke. Mouse models of ICH, induced by collagenase or blood infusion, commonly target striatum, but not other brain sites such as ventricular system, cortex, and hippocampus. Few studies have systemically investigated brain damage and neurobehavioral deficits that develop in animal models of ICH in these areas of the right hemisphere. Therefore, we evaluated the brain damage and neurobehavioral dysfunction associated with right hemispheric ICH in ventricle, cortex, hippocampus, and striatum...
February 16, 2018: Brain, Behavior, and Immunity
Laura Alonso-Recio, Pilar Martín-Plasencia, Miguel Ruiz, Juan Manuel Serrano
INTRODUCTION: Cognitive impairments are common in Parkinson's disease (PD) patients without dementia. These deficits are quite heterogeneous, which makes it difficult to recognize and treat them. For this reason, many authors have attempted to classify patients into more homogeneous groups with diverse results. The present study was designed to analyze the cognitive heterogeneity in PD patients using a novel data-driven approach, latent profile analysis (LPA), to classify patients according to cognitive characteristics...
February 12, 2018: Journal of Clinical and Experimental Neuropsychology
Zehra Batool, Saiqa Tabassum, Rafat Ali Siddiqui, Saida Haider
Scopolamine, an anti-muscarinic agent, has been shown to induce amnesia and oxidative stress similar to that observed in the older age. The present study was designed to determine the relationship between the oxidative status and memory improvement in scopolamine injected rats pre-administered with almonds. Rats (n = 8) in the almond group were administered orally with 400 mg/kg almond suspension for 28 days daily before the intraperitoneal injection of scopolamine (0.5 mg/kg). Passive avoidance task (PAT) was used to assess memory function at the end of treatment...
February 10, 2018: Plant Foods for Human Nutrition
A Harrison Brody, Stephen M Strittmatter
Alzheimer's disease (AD) represents an impending global health crisis, yet the complexity of AD pathophysiology has so far precluded the development of any interventions to successfully slow or halt AD progression. It is clear that accumulation of Amyloid-beta (Aβ) peptide triggers progressive synapse loss to cause AD symptoms. Once initiated by Aβ, disease progression is complicated and accelerated by inflammation and by tau pathology. The recognition that Aβ peptide assumes multiple distinct states and that soluble oligomeric species (Aβo) are critical for synaptic damage is central to molecular understanding of AD...
2018: Advances in Pharmacology
Youssef Ezzyat, Paul A Wanda, Deborah F Levy, Allison Kadel, Ada Aka, Isaac Pedisich, Michael R Sperling, Ashwini D Sharan, Bradley C Lega, Alexis Burks, Robert E Gross, Cory S Inman, Barbara C Jobst, Mark A Gorenstein, Kathryn A Davis, Gregory A Worrell, Michal T Kucewicz, Joel M Stein, Richard Gorniak, Sandhitsu R Das, Daniel S Rizzuto, Michael J Kahana
Memory failures are frustrating and often the result of ineffective encoding. One approach to improving memory outcomes is through direct modulation of brain activity with electrical stimulation. Previous efforts, however, have reported inconsistent effects when using open-loop stimulation and often target the hippocampus and medial temporal lobes. Here we use a closed-loop system to monitor and decode neural activity from direct brain recordings in humans. We apply targeted stimulation to lateral temporal cortex and report that this stimulation rescues periods of poor memory encoding...
February 6, 2018: Nature Communications
Ao Xiong, Ge Jin, Renping Xiong, Hong Lu
OBJECTIVE: To observe the protein expression related to cognitive and learning memory function, and to investigate the effect of aquaporin 4 (AQP4) silence on learning and memory function in traumatic brain injury (TBI) rats. METHODS: Ninety-six healthy adult male Wistar rats were divided into groups according to the random number table. (1) Forty-eight rats were divided into sham operation (sham) group, TBI group (by using modified Feeney method), AQP4 RNA interference (RNAi) negative group [TBI+meaningless small interfering RNA (siRNA)-AQP4 liposome solution 10 μL], and AQP4 RNAi group (TBI+siRNA-AQP4 liposome solution 10 μL)...
February 2018: Zhonghua Wei Zhong Bing Ji Jiu Yi Xue
Ilana J Bennett, Shauna M Stark, Craig E L Stark
Objectives: The current study examined recognition memory dysfunction and its neuroanatomical substrates in cognitively normal older adults and those diagnosed with mild cognitive impairment (MCI). Methods: Participants completed the Mnemonic Similarity Task, which provides simultaneous measures of recognition memory and mnemonic discrimination. They also underwent structural neuroimaging to assess volume of medial temporal cortex and hippocampal subfields. Results: As expected, individuals diagnosed with MCI had significantly worse recognition memory performance and reduced volume across medial temporal cortex and hippocampal subfields relative to cognitively normal older adults...
February 1, 2018: Journals of Gerontology. Series B, Psychological Sciences and Social Sciences
Zhao-Hui Yao, Xiao-Li Yao, Yong Zhang, Shao-Feng Zhang, Ji-Chang Hu
Neuroinflammation and oxidative stress play an important role in cognition deficit following chronic cerebral hypoperfusion (CCH). Luteolin, a natural flavonoid found in many plants, is known for a variety of pharmacological activities, such as its anti-inflammatory, anti-allergy, urate, anti-tumor, antibacterial, and antiviral effects. To assess whether luteolin could prevent CCH-induced cognitive dysfunction, through its anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative-stress effects, we used enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays, enzyme activity assays, behavioral methods, immunohistochemistry, and electrophysiology to detect neuroinflammation and oxidative stress, cognition alterations, and long-term potential (LTP), in a bilateral common carotid arteries ligation (2VO) rat model...
February 1, 2018: Neurochemical Research
Kimberly N Hood, Jing Zhao, John B Redell, Michael J Hylin, Brynn Harris, Alec Perez, Anthony N Moore, Pramod K Dash
Adult hippocampal neurogenesis has been shown to be required for certain types of cognitive function. For example, studies have shown that these neurons are critical for pattern separation, the ability to store similar experiences as distinct memories. Although traumatic brain injury (TBI) has been shown to cause the loss of newborn hippocampal neurons, the signaling pathway(s) that triggers their death is unknown. Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress activates the PERK-eIF2α pathway that acts to restore ER function and improve cell survival...
January 31, 2018: Journal of Neuroscience: the Official Journal of the Society for Neuroscience
Linjie Yu, Yi Liu, Yuexinzi Jin, Xiang Cao, Jian Chen, Jiali Jin, Yue Gu, Xinyu Bao, Zhuoying Ren, Yun Xu, Xiaolei Zhu
Amyloid-β (Aβ) induces a burst of oxidative stress and plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Our previous results have shown that histone deacetylase 3 (HDAC3) inhibition ameliorates spatial memory deficits and decreases the Aβ burden in the brains of 9-month-old APPswe/PS1dE9 (APP/PS1) mice. In this study, we investigated the role of HDAC3 inhibition in oxidative stress in vivo and in vitro models of AD. HDAC3 was detected mainly in the neurons, and HDAC3 inhibition significantly decreased reactive oxygen species generation and improved primary cortical neuron viability...
2018: Journal of Alzheimer's Disease: JAD
Ajna Hamidovic, Lionel Candelaria, Ihsan Rodriguez, Mikiko Yamada, James Nawarskas, Mark R Burge
The highest incidence of relapse to smoking occurs within the first 2 weeks of a cessation attempt. In addition to enhanced nicotine craving, this phase of smoking cessation is also marked by learning and memory dysfunction. Many smokers are not able to overcome these symptoms, and they relapse to smoking shortly after trying to quit. In two clinical studies, we evaluated intranasal insulin for efficacy in improving learning and memory function during nicotine withdrawal. Our first study was a crossover evaluation (N = 19) following 20 hr of smoking abstinence...
January 24, 2018: Human Psychopharmacology
Kaitlin Folweiler, Sandy Samuel, Hannah Metheny, Akiva S Cohen
Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) disrupts hippocampal function and can lead to long-lasting episodic memory impairments. The encoding of episodic memories relies on spatial information processing within the hippocampus. As the primary entry point for spatial information into hippocampus, the dentate gyrus is thought to function as a physiological gate, or filter, of afferent excitation before reaching downstream area CA3. While injury has previously been shown to alter dentate gyrus network excitability, it is unknown whether mTBI affects dentate gyrus output to area CA3...
January 16, 2018: Journal of Neurotrauma
Alan Leviton, Robert M Joseph, Elizabeth N Allred, T Michael O'Shea, H Gerry Taylor, Karl K C Kuban
To find out why children born extremely preterm are at heightened risk of executive dysfunctions, the authors assessed 716 children who were 10 years old born extremely preterm whose IQ was ≥ 70. A working memory dysfunction (n = 169), an inhibition dysfunction (n = 360), a switching dysfunction (355), and all 3 (executive dysfunction; n = 107) were defined on the basis of Z-scores ≤ -1 on the Differential Ability Scales-II Working Memory composite, and/or on the NEPSY-II Inhibition-Inhibition and Inhibition-Switching subtests...
January 1, 2018: Journal of Child Neurology
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