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Vitality skin forensic

L Ressel, U Hetzel, E Ricci
Veterinary pathologists commonly encounter lesions of blunt trauma. The development of lesions is affected by the object's mass, velocity, size, shape, and angle of impact and by the plasticity and mobility of the impacted organ. Scrape, impact, and pattern abrasions cause localized epidermal loss and sometimes broken hairs and implanted foreign material. Contusions are best identified after reflecting the skin, and must be differentiated from coagulopathies and livor mortis. Lacerations-traumatic tissue tears-may have irregular margins, bridging by more resilient tissue, deviation of the wound tail, crushed hairs, and unilateral abrasion...
September 2016: Veterinary Pathology
Khurshid A Mattoo, Rishabh Garg, Shalabh Kumar
CONTEXT: This study is a continuation of the earlier studies and has been extended to investigate the potential forensic markers of elder abuse. AIMS: To determine the prevalence of elder abuse in various outpatient departments (OPDs). To study the associated parameters related to the abuser and the abused. To determine the existence of potential forensic markers of elder abuse. SETTINGS AND DESIGN: The subjects were randomly selected from the medical and the dental OPDs of the university...
September 2015: Journal of Forensic Dental Sciences
Jean-Matthieu Casse, Laurent Martrille, Jean-Michel Vignaud, Guillaume Gauchotte
Wound age evaluation is one of the most challenging issues in forensic pathology. In the first minutes or hours, standard histological examination may not determine whether the wound was inflicted in the pre- or post-mortem period. While red blood cell infiltration is classically considered as a sign of vital reaction, several studies have shown that extravasation of blood cells may also occur after death and cannot be used as a reliable marker in the diagnosis of wound vitality. Numerous studies about wound vitality are available in the literature...
April 2016: Medicine, Science, and the Law
Biji T Kurien, Debashish Danda, R Hal Scofield
Dactyloscopy or fingerprint identification is a vital part of forensic evidence. Identification with fingerprints has been known since the finding of finger impressions on the clay surface of Babylonian legal contracts almost 4,000 years ago. The skin on the fingers and palms appears as grooves and ridges when observed under a microscope. A unique fingerprint is produced by the patterns of these friction skin ridges. Visible fingerprints can be deposited on solid surfaces. Colored inks have been used to deposit fingermarks on documents...
2015: Methods in Molecular Biology
(no author information available yet)
Hanging is a form of ligature strangulation in which the force applied to the neck is derived from the gravitational drag of one's own body weight. A furrow-dessication is the most common form of ligature mark on the skin. The furrow is a postmortem phenomenon due to ligature pressure and it is more detectable as the suspension time becomes longer.Vital reaction is a phenomenon that shows if the injury was pre- mortal. Vital signs could be present at the injury site, thus it is termed as local, but they could also be remote from the injury site, and then they are termed general vital signs...
January 2015: Srpski Arhiv za Celokupno Lekarstvo
Akihiko Kimura, Yuko Ishida, Mizuho Nosaka, Maiko Shiraki, Mizuki Hama, Takashi Kawaguchi, Yumi Kuninaka, Emi Shimada, Hiroki Yamamoto, Tatsunori Takayasu, Toshikazu Kondo
Detection of vitality of mechanical wounds in human cadavers is one of the important issues in forensic medicine. In order to explore novel markers for vitality of acute mechanical wounds, we investigated autophagy in mouse and human skin wounds. Western blotting analysis of mouse skin wounds showed marked reduction of LC3-II and reciprocal increase of p62 in wound samples with the postinfliction intervals of ≥0.5 h, compared with the uninjured skin tissues. These observations indicated that autophagy level was reduced in the wound sites...
May 2015: International Journal of Legal Medicine
S Bacci, B Defraia, L Cinci, L Calosi, D Guasti, L Pieri, V Lotti, A Bonelli, P Romagnoli
The response to wounds until healing requires the activity of many cell types coordinate in space and time, so that the types of cells in a wound and their localization may be of help to date lesions with respect to death, which would be useful in forensic pathology. Cells reacting to injury include dendritic cells; the early reaction of these cells to skin wounding has not yet been investigated in humans, which was the aim of this study. Samples of wounded and control skin were taken at autopsy and analyzed by affinity histochemistry...
November 2014: Forensic Science International
Franklin R W van de Goot, H Ibrahim Korkmaz, Judith Fronczek, Birgit I Witte, Rob Visser, Magda M W Ulrich, Mark P V Begieneman, Lawrence Rozendaal, Paul A J Krijnen, Hans W M Niessen
PURPOSE OF THE STUDY: In forensic autopsies it is important to determine the age of early vital skin wounds as accurate as possible. In addition to inflammation, coagulation is also induced in vital wounds. Analysis of blood coagulation markers in wound hemorrhage could therefore be an important additional discriminating factor in wound age determination. The aim of this study was to develop a wound age probability scoring system, based on the immunohistochemical expression levels of Fibronectin, CD62p and Factor VIII in wound hemorrhage...
November 2014: Forensic Science International
Massimo Montisci, Matteo Corradin, Luciano Giacomelli, Guido Viel, Giovanni Cecchetto, Santo Davide Ferrara
Markers of skin wound vitality and the research methodology used for their determination are still matters of debate in forensic pathology. Cathepsin-D, a lysosomal enzyme, is the most expressed cathepsin in human skin, and although it seems to have the necessary requirements to be utilized as a vitality marker, past research has provided no definitive and clear response on its potential usefulness. Immunohistochemistry with monoclonal antibodies and image analysis has been employed to detect and quantify the expression of Cathepsin-D in human skin wounds...
July 2014: Medicine, Science, and the Law
Guillaume Gauchotte, Marie-Pierre Wissler, Jean-Matthieu Casse, Julien Pujo, Christophe Minetti, Héloïse Gisquet, Charlène Vigouroux, François Plénat, Jean-Michel Vignaud, Laurent Martrille
The timing of skin wounds is one of the most challenging problems in forensic pathology. In the first minutes or hours after infliction, histological examination fails to determine whether a wound was sustained before or after death. The aim of this study was to evaluate the use of three immunohistochemical markers (FVIIIra, CD15, and tryptase) for the interpretation of the timing of cutaneous stab wounds. We evaluated these markers in intravital wounds from autopsy cases (n = 12) and surgical specimens (n = 58)...
September 2013: International Journal of Legal Medicine
A Venara, A Gaudin, J Lebigot, G Airagnes, J F Hamel, N Jousset, C Ridereau-Zins, D Mauillon, C Rouge-Maillart
INTRODUCTION: Forensic doctors are frequently asked by magistrates when dealing principally with knife wounds, about the depth of the blade which may have penetrated the victim's body. Without the use of imaging, it is often difficult to respond to this question, even in an approximate way. Knowledge of the various distances between organs and the skin wall would allow an assessment to be made of the minimum blade length required to obtain the injuries observed. The objective of this study is thus to determine average distances between the vital organs of the thorax and abdomen, and the skin wall, taking into account the person's body mass index (BMI)...
June 10, 2013: Forensic Science International
Guillaume Gauchotte, Laurent Martrille, François Plénat, Jean-Michel Vignaud
Skin wounds datation is one of the most challenging problems in forensic pathology. The vitality of a recent wound cannot be affirmed when no inflammatory cell is visible. There are in the literature numerous studies about wound vitality, looking for markers involved in coagulation or inflammation, using various methods such as enzymology, molecular biology or immunohistochemistry. In this update, we first introduce some methodological principles to respect. Then, we review the main studies available in the literature...
April 2013: Annales de Pathologie
A Taborelli, S Andreola, A Di Giancamillo, G Gentile, C Domeneghini, M Grandi, C Cattaneo
The distinction between antemortem and postmortem wounds is one of the most important medico-legal problems. In fresh cadavers the macroscopic examination of haemorrhagic infiltration can be sufficient to reveal the vitality of a wound but in more difficult cases (putrefied corpses) histological and histochemical analyses need to be performed. The scope of this study was to detect the vitality of soft tissue samples in an advanced state of putrefaction using a monoclonal anti-human Glycoforin A antibody in order to evaluate the presence of red blood cells or red blood cell residues...
2011: Medicine, Science, and the Law
Kanwar Deep Singh Nanda, K Ranganathan, Km Umadevi, Elizabeth Joshua
OBJECTIVE: Saliva is one of the vital fluids secreted in human beings. Significant amount of saliva is deposited on the skin during biting, sucking or licking, and can act as an important source in forensic evidence. An enzyme, α amylase, gives a characteristic emission spectrum at 345-355 nm when excited at 282 nm and this can be identified by using fluorescent spectroscopy and can help in forensic identification. This study describes a rapid method to detect dried saliva on the human skin by fluorescent spectroscopy...
January 2011: Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Pathology: JOMFP
Emanuela Turillazzi, Giuseppe Vacchiano, Aurelio Luna-Maldonado, Margherita Neri, Cristoforo Pomara, Roberto Rabozzi, Irene Riezzo, Vittorio Fineschi
In forensic practice, it is required to distinguish between suicidal or accidental hanging and simulated hanging. Conventional macroscopic and histological findings may be unreliable; vital signs are often absent, and they can be produced postmortem. The application of immunohistochemical techniques opened up a new field of investigation in the issue of ligature marks. We investigated the immunohistochemical expression of a panel of cytokines and inflammatory cells in skin specimens in autopsy cases of death due to hanging, to discuss their significance in assessing whether hanging mark and signs occurred before or after the death of the victim...
December 2010: Histology and Histopathology
Toshikazu Kondo, Yuko Ishida
Skin-wound healing is an orchestrated biological phenomena consisting of three sequential phases, inflammation, proliferation, and maturation. Many biological substances are involved in the process of wound repair, and this short and simplified overview of wound healing can be adopted to determine wound vitality or wound age in forensic medicine. With the development of genetically engineered animals, essential molecules for skin-wound healing have been identified. Especially, cytokines, and growth factors are useful candidates and markers for the determination of wound vitality or age...
December 15, 2010: Forensic Science International
Vivek Sahajpal, S P Goyal
The exhibits obtained in wildlife offence cases quite often present a challenging situation for the forensic expert. The selection of proper approach for analysis is vital for a successful analysis. A generalised forensic analysis approach should proceed from the use of non-destructive techniques (morphological and microscopic examination) to partially destructive and finally destructive techniques (DNA analysis). The findings of non-destructive techniques may sometime be inconclusive but they definitely help in steering further forensic analysis in a proper direction...
June 2010: Science & Justice: Journal of the Forensic Science Society
Cristina Cattaneo, Salvatore Andreola, Eloisa Marinelli, Pasquale Poppa, Davide Porta, Marco Grandi
An example of the barriers and conceptual differences between forensic anthropology and pathology can be seen in determining the vitality of a wound. Pathology can make use of skin color and microscopic techniques; anthropology (as concerns the study of dry bone) needs different criteria. The diagnosis of the vitality of a wound (whether it is produced antemortem or postmortem) as well as determination of the time elapsed between the production of the wound and death is a crucial issue in forensic pathology...
March 2010: American Journal of Forensic Medicine and Pathology
Emanuela Turillazzi, Sabina Di Donato, Carmela Fiore, Vittorio Fineschi
Decapitation as homicidal mode of death is relatively rare. In most cases of decapitation, the differentiation between the modes of death might be difficult to some extent, particularly in cases where essential investigative elements, like the decedent's head and the weapon, are unavailable. Our report concerns a case of homicide by decapitation without any further mutilation of the victim, where only the combination of autopsy results, histologic findings, and engineering technical reconstruction allowed us to identify with certainty the mode of death as vital decapitation...
December 2009: American Journal of Forensic Medicine and Pathology
Yalçin Büyük, Uğur Koçak
In this retrospective autopsy study fire-related deaths whose autopsies were carried out in the Council of Forensic Medicine in Istanbul, Turkey were analyzed in order to evaluate the relationship between the mode of the death and the laboratory and autopsy findings. There were 320 fire-related fatalities constituting the 2.07% of all autopsy cases of that period. Of the 320 cases 228 (71.3%) were males and 91 (28.4%) were females, average age in age-determined group was 36.6 (SD: 21.98) ranging from 8 months to 98 years...
November 2009: Journal of Forensic and Legal Medicine
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