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Vincent Plagnol, Samuel Woodhouse, Karen Howarth, Stefanie Lensing, Matt Smith, Michael Epstein, Mikidache Madi, Sarah Smalley, Catherine Leroy, Jonathan Hinton, Frank de Kievit, Esther Musgrave-Brown, Colin Herd, Katherine Baker-Neblett, Will Brennan, Peter Dimitrov, Nathan Campbell, Clive Morris, Nitzan Rosenfeld, James Clark, Davina Gale, Jamie Platt, John Calaway, Greg Jones, Tim Forshew
Circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) analysis is being incorporated into cancer care; notably in profiling patients to guide treatment decisions. Responses to targeted therapies have been observed in patients with actionable mutations detected in plasma DNA at variant allele fractions (VAFs) below 0.5%. Highly sensitive methods are therefore required for optimal clinical use. To enable objective assessment of assay performance, detailed analytical validation is required. We developed the InVisionFirst™ assay, an assay based on enhanced tagged amplicon sequencing (eTAm-Seq™) technology to profile 36 genes commonly mutated in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and other cancer types for actionable genomic alterations in cell-free DNA...
2018: PloS One
Kentaro Inamura
Immunohistochemistry is a widely available technique that is less challenging and can provide clinically meaningful results quickly and cost-efficiently in comparison with other techniques. In addition, immunohistochemistry allows for the evaluation of cellular localization of proteins in the context of tumor structure. In an era of precision medicine, pathologists are required to classify lung cancer into specific subtypes and assess biomarkers relevant to molecular-targeted therapies. This review summarizes the hot topics of immunohistochemistry in lung cancer, including (i) adenocarcinoma vs squamous cell carcinoma; (ii) neuroendocrine markers; (iii) ALK, ROS1, and EGFR; (iv) PD-L1 (CD274); (v) lung carcinoma vs malignant mesothelioma; and (vi) NUT carcinoma...
March 14, 2018: Cancers
Véronique Hofman, Sandra Lassalle, Coraline Bence, Elodie Long-Mira, Sacha Nahon-Estève, Simon Heeke, Virginie Lespinet-Fabre, Catherine Butori, Marius Ilié, Paul Hofman
The identification of certain genomic alterations ( EGFR , ALK , ROS1 , BRAF ) or immunological markers (PD-L1) in tissues or cells has led to targeted treatment for patients presenting with late stage or metastatic lung cancer. These biomarkers can be detected by immunohistochemistry (IHC) and/or by molecular biology (MB) techniques. These approaches are often complementary but depending on, the quantity and quality of the biological material, the urgency to get the results, the access to technological platforms, the financial resources and the expertise of the team, the choice of the approach can be questioned...
March 13, 2018: Cancers
Li Sun, Zhicheng Xiong, Chengbo Han
In recent years, series of driver genes, such as EGFR, KRAS/NRAS, BRAF, PIK3CA, ALK and ROS1 and so on, have been found in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) one after another with the development of molecular detecting technology. Targeted drugs bring benefits for these NSCLC patients with driver gene variations. However, some NSCLC did not have any known driver gene variations; we called it pan-negative lung cancer. In this paper, we summarize the concept, clinical pathological characteristics, the epidemiological characteristics, treatment and prognosis of pan-negative NSCLC...
February 20, 2018: Zhongguo Fei Ai za Zhi, Chinese Journal of Lung Cancer
You-Cai Zhu, Yue-Fen Zhou, Wen-Xian Wang, Chun-Wei Xu, Wu Zhuang, Kai-Qi Du, Gang Chen
ROS1 rearrangement is a validated therapeutic driver gene in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and represents a small subset (1-2%) of NSCLC. A total of 17 different fusion partner genes of ROS1 in NSCLC have been reported. The multi-targeted MET/ALK/ROS1 tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) crizotinib has demonstrated remarkable efficacy in ROS1-rearranged NSCLC. Consequently, ROS1 detection assays include fluorescence in situ hybridization, immunohistochemistry, and real-time PCR. Next-generation sequencing (NGS) assay covers a range of fusion genes and approaches to discover novel receptor-kinase rearrangements in lung cancer...
March 8, 2018: Thoracic Cancer
Anand A Dalal, Annie Guerin, Alex Mutebi, Kenneth W Culver
AIMS: To assess the time to BRAF testing, compare the characteristics of tested versus not-tested patients, and describe the costs for sequential versus next-generation sequencing (NGS) BRAF testing. METHODS: Patients diagnosed with lung cancer after 12/1/2013 were identified from two US claims databases; their characteristics were assessed during the 12 months before diagnosis (index date). Testing modalities were analyzed from the index date to end of continuous health plan enrollment or data availability (12/2015) based on combinations of Current Procedural Terminology (CPT) procedure codes...
March 8, 2018: Journal of Medical Economics
B Melosky, N Blais, P Cheema, C Couture, R Juergens, S Kamel-Reid, M-S Tsao, P Wheatley-Price, Z Xu, D N Ionescu
Background: The development and approval of both targeted and immune therapies for patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (nsclc) has significantly improved patient survival rates and quality of life. Biomarker testing for patients newly diagnosed with nsclc, as well as for patients progressing after treatment with epidermal growth factor receptor ( EGFR ) inhibitors, is the standard of care in Canada and many parts of the world. Methods: A group of thoracic oncology experts in the field of thoracic oncology met to describe the standard for biomarker testing for lung cancer in the Canadian context, focusing on evidence-based recommendations for standard-of-care testing for EGFR , anaplastic lymphoma kinase ( ALK ), ROS1 , BRAF V600 and programmed death-ligand (PD-L1) at the time of diagnosis of advanced disease and EGFR T790M upon progression...
February 2018: Current Oncology
Nicolas Albin, Anne Mc Leer, Linda Sakhri
In recent years, high-throughput sequencing techniques have been developed for cancerology and many clinical trials are currently structured around biomarkers that can guide specific treatment choices. This approach is characteristic of precision medicine, which is actually a concept initiated several decades ago with, for example, retinoic acid in promyelocytic leukemia. This paper will review the different types of molecular alterations and « -omics » biological analyses, bioinformatics tools, coupled drug/biomarkers already validated, the ethical issues of whole genomic sequencing of an individual as part of an inclusion in a clinical trial and finally the first results of precision medicine trials...
February 28, 2018: Bulletin du Cancer
Maria D Lozano, José I Echeveste, Marta Abengozar, Luis D Mejías, Miguel A Idoate, Alfonso Calvo, Carlos E de Andrea
CONTEXT: - The rapid advances in targeted therapies in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) make the optimization and implementation of cytology specimens for molecular testing a priority. Up to 70% of patients with NSCLC are diagnosed at advanced stages and tissue biopsies often cannot be taken. Although cytology samples provide high-quality material for molecular testing, molecular cytopathology is not yet well known or widely used. OBJECTIVE: - To report the many advances in molecular cytopathology and the suitability and utility of cytology samples in molecular and genetic testing of NSCLC...
March 2018: Archives of Pathology & Laboratory Medicine
Mark Kriegsmann, Alexander Harms, Daniel Kazdal, Sebastian Fischer, Albrecht Stenzinger, Jonas Leichsenring, Roland Penzel, Rémi Longuespée, Katharina Kriegsmann, Thomas Muley, Seyer Safi, Arne Warth
In the last decade it became evident that many lung adenocarcinomas (ADC) harbor key genetic alterations such as KRAS, EGFR or BRAF mutations as well as rearrangements of ROS1 or ALK that drive these tumors. In the present study we investigated whether different driver mutations of ADC result in different proliferation rates, which might have clinical impact, including resistance to therapy, recurrence and prognosis. We analyzed the proliferation index (PI) on full slides of surgically resected ADC (n = 230) with known genetic aberrations by means of immunohistochemistry and subsequent digital image analysis and correlated the results with clinicopathological variables including overall (OS) and disease free survival (DFS)...
January 2, 2018: Pathology, Research and Practice
Wenfeng Gou, Xuejiao Zhou, Zi Liu, Lijing Wang, Jiwei Shen, Xiaobo Xu, Zengqiang Li, Xin Zhai, Daiying Zuo, Yingliang Wu
The c-ros oncogene 1 (ROS1) is a receptor tyrosine kinase, which has been identified as an oncogene driver of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Although crizotinib has a prominent effect on ROS1, resistance is inevitable. Development of the acquired ROS1 G2032R mutation has been reported as a resistant mechanism to ROS1 inhibitors in ROS1-rearranged (ROS1+ ) NSCLC patients. To explore the mechanism of drug resistance, we constructed the crizotinib resistance cell line, A549-CD74-ROS1 G2032R mutation cells, by the methods of fusion polymerase chain reaction (PCR), plasmid construction and cell transfection in vitro...
February 22, 2018: Cancer Letters
Ling Tan, Yerong Hu, Yongguang Tao, Bin Wang, Jun Xiao, Zhenjie Tang, Ting Lu, Hao Tang
BACKGROUND: To identify whether RET is a potential target for NSCLC treatment, we examined the status of the RET gene in 631 early and mid stage NSCLC cases from south central China. METHODS: RET expression was identified by Western blot. RET-positive expression samples were verified by immunohistochemistry. RET gene mutation, copy number variation, and rearrangement were analyzed by DNA Sanger sequencing, TaqMan copy number assays, and reverse transcription-PCR...
February 23, 2018: Thoracic Cancer
V Noronha, M V Chandrakanth, A P Joshi, V Patil, A Chougule, A Mahajan, A K Janu, R Chanana, K Prabhash
ROS1 rearrangement acts as a driver mutation in 1-2% of NSCLC. Crizotinib is approved in this situation both in treatment naïve and pre-treated patients. Here we report our experience with crizotinib in patients with advanced NSCLC harbouring ROS1 rearrangement. Eleven patients were included in our study. More than half of our patients had associated comorbidities and one fourth of them had a compromised performance status. Out of 11 patients, 5 of them were exposed to crizotinib .The response rates among crizotinib treated patients was 80%...
April 2017: Indian Journal of Cancer
Jing Zhao, Xiaotong Chen, J Zheng, M Kong, B Wang, W Ding
BACKGROUND: ROS1 immunohistochemistry (IHC) using D4D6 antibody is a useful tool for screening patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) slated for targeted therapy. Many studies and our data have identified cases that express the ROS1 protein strongly but are negative for ROS1 by fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH). The present study investigated the driver mutation and clinicopathologic characteristics of 26 discordant cases (ROS1 IHC-positive but FISH-negative) to find new clues for distinguishing real ROS1-rearranged cases...
February 21, 2018: Histopathology
X Pan, T Lv, F Zhang, H Fan, H Liu, Y Song
BACKGROUND: The subgroup of young patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is poorly understood. We retrospectively studied the clinical characteristics, gene mutations, and outcomes of patients with NSCLC (aged ≤ 40 years). RESULTS: Of the 7494 patients with lung cancer diagnosed from February 2001 to October 2016, 252 aged ≤ 40 years showed NSCLC. We divided their cases into non-squamous cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma groups according to their histology results...
February 19, 2018: Clinical & Translational Oncology
(no author information available yet)
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
March 2018: Journal of Clinical Pathology
Aniello Cerrato, Roberta Visconti, Angela Celetti
Gene fusions occur in up to 17% of solid tumours. Oncogenic kinases are often involved in such fusions. In lung cancer, almost 30% of patients carrying an activated oncogene show the fusion of a tyrosine kinase to an heterologous gene. Several genes are partner in the fusion with the three kinases ALK, ROS1 and RET in lung. The impaired function of the partner gene, in combination with the activation of the kinase, may alter the cell signaling and promote the cancer cell addiction to the oncogene. Moreover, the gene that is partner in the fusion to the kinase may affect the response to therapeutics and/or promote resistance in the cancer cells...
February 19, 2018: Molecular Cancer
Tatjana Vlajnic, Spasenija Savic, Audrey Barascud, Betty Baschiera, Michel Bihl, Bruno Grilli, Michelle Herzog, Julien Rebetez, Lukas Bubendorf
BACKGROUND: Rearrangements of the ROS1 oncogene are found in 1% to 2% of non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLC) and are regarded as mutually exclusive oncogenic driver mutations. Since the approval of targeted therapy for ROS1-positive NSCLC, ROS1 testing has become a part of the diagnostic routine. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), optionally selected for by immunohistochemistry on histological material, is a common practice for the detection of ROS1 rearrangements. However, NSCLC often is diagnosed by cytology alone, requiring predictive marker testing on cytological specimens...
February 16, 2018: Cancer Cytopathology
Jacques Cadranel, Alexis B Cortot, Hervé Lena, Bertrand Mennecier, Pascal Do, Eric Dansin, Julien Mazieres, Christos Chouaid, Maurice Perol, Fabrice Barlesi, Gilles Robinet, Sylvie Friard, Luc Thiberville, Clarisse Audigier-Valette, Alain Vergnenegre, Virginie Westeel, Khemaies Slimane, Alexandru Buturuga, Denis Moro-Sibilot, Benjamin Besse
Here we report our experience of ceritinib in crizotinib-pretreated patients with anaplastic lymphoma kinase ( ALK ) positive ( ALK + ) non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in a French temporary authorisation for use (TAU) study. The French TAU study included crizotinib-pretreated patients with advanced ALK + or ROS proto-oncogene 1 positive ( ROS1 + ) tumours. Patients received oral ceritinib (750 mg·day -1 as a starting dose) and best tumour response (as evaluated by the investigator) and safety were reported every 3 months...
January 2018: ERJ Open Research
Gonzalo Labarca, Iván Caviedes, Erik Folch, Adnan Majid, Sebastián Fernández-Bussy
In the last years, several techniques have been developed to obtain a prompt diagnosis or rule out lung cancer. Endobronchial ultrasound- guided transbronchial needle aspiration (EBUS-TBNA) is a minimally invasive procedure with a high diagnostic yield for mediastinal and central pulmonary lesions. This procedure is especially useful for lung cancer diagnosis and mediastinal staging. Two different types of EBUS are currently available: Radial EBUS and lineal EBUS. Each one has technical differences together with a range of clinical indications...
September 2017: Revista Médica de Chile
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