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gut feelings

Florian Augustin, Thomas Schmid
Uniportal VATS (U-VATS) is gaining more and more popularity. Herein, we discuss the current status of adoption of the technique and-from a "laggard's" point of view-some situations when the use of U-VATS should be reconsidered. As we all do lack scientific evidence for the superiority of one minimally invasive approach over the other, these situations reflect a gut feeling rather than solid arguments. The article should raise awareness of currently discussed issues with minimally invasive approaches...
2018: Journal of Visualized Surgery
Jackson Liang, Lucy Erin O'Brien
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
March 1, 2018: Nature
Anette Fischer Pedersen, Mads Lind Ingeman, Peter Vedsted
OBJECTIVE: Research has suggested that physicians' gut feelings are associated with parents' concerns for the well-being of their children. Gut feeling is particularly important in diagnosis of serious low-incidence diseases in primary care. Therefore, the aim of this study was to examine whether empathy, that is, the ability to understand what another person is experiencing, relates to general practitioners' (GPs) use of gut feelings. Since empathy is associated with burn-out, we also examined whether the hypothesised influence of empathy on gut feeling use is dependent on level of burn-out...
February 28, 2018: BMJ Open
Allison W Xu
Bile acids facilitate dietary fat absorption upon release into the small intestine after a meal. A recent study by Liu and colleagues identifies a gut-brain axis wherein bile acids signal an energy-replete state to hypothalamic AgRP neurons via activation of neuronal FGF receptors, which orchestrate whole-body glucose metabolism.
February 21, 2018: Trends in Endocrinology and Metabolism: TEM
(no author information available yet)
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
February 23, 2018: Development
Sophie Turnbull, Patricia J Lucas, Niamh M Redmond, Hannah Christensen, Hannah Thornton, Christie Cabral, Peter S Blair, Brendan C Delaney, Matthew Thompson, Paul Little, Tim J Peters, Alastair D Hay
BACKGROUND: The objectives were to identify 1) the clinician and child characteristics associated with; 2) clinical management decisions following from, and; 3) the prognostic value of; a clinician's 'gut feeling something is wrong' for children presenting to primary care with acute cough and respiratory tract infection (RTI). METHODS: Multicentre prospective cohort study where 518 primary care clinicians across 244 general practices in England assessed 8394 children aged ≥3 months and < 16 years for acute cough and RTI...
February 5, 2018: BMC Family Practice
Steven H Woolf, Alex H Krist, Jennifer Elston Lafata, Resa M Jones, Rebecca R Lehman, Camille J Hochheimer, Roy T Sabo, Dominick L Frosch, Brian J Zikmund-Fisher, Daniel R Longo
INTRODUCTION: Engaging patients to make informed choices is paramount but difficult in busy practices. This study sought to engage patients outside the clinical setting to better understand how they approach cancer screening decisions, including their primary concerns and their preferences for finalizing their decision. METHODS: Twelve primary care practices offering patients an online personal health record invited eligible patients to complete a 17-item online interactive module...
December 11, 2017: American Journal of Preventive Medicine
Ashley York
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
December 8, 2017: Nature Reviews. Microbiology
Samantha N Freedman, Shailesh K Shahi, Ashutosh K Mangalam
Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic neuroinflammatory disease of the central nervous system with unknown etiology. Recently, the gut microbiota has emerged as a potential factor in the development of MS, with a number of studies having shown that patients with MS exhibit gut dysbiosis. The gut microbiota helps the host remain healthy by regulating various functions, including food metabolism, energy homeostasis, maintenance of the intestinal barrier, inhibition of colonization by pathogenic organisms, and shaping of both mucosal and systemic immune responses...
January 2018: Neurotherapeutics: the Journal of the American Society for Experimental NeuroTherapeutics
Lisa M Gargano, Sindhushree Hosakote, Qi Zhi, Kristine A Qureshi, Robyn R Gershon
The purpose of this study was to identify individual characteristics, behaviors, and psychosocial factors associated with symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) among World Trade Center (WTC) disaster evacuation survivors. The study utilized a mixed-method design. In-depth interviews were conducted using a prepared script. PTSD was assessed using the PTSD checklist-civilian (PCL-C; a score ≥ 50 indicates probable PTSD). Thematic analysis was conducted to identify factors associated with PTSD. A purposive sample of 29 WTC evacuees was recruited using a multimodal recruitment strategy...
September 2017: Journal of Emergency Management: JEM
Shin-Ya Ueda, Hidehiro Nakahara, Eriko Kawai, Tatsuya Usui, Shintaro Tsuji, Tadayoshi Miyamoto
The effects of water exercise on gut hormone concentrations and appetite currently remain unclear. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of treadmill walking in water on gut hormone concentrations and appetite. Thirteen men (mean ± s.d. age: 21.6 ± 2.2 years, body mass index: 22.7 ± 2.8 kg/m2, peak oxygen uptake (VO2peak): 49.8 ± 7.8 mL/kg per min) participated in the walking in water and on land challenge. During the study period, ratings of subjective feelings of hunger, fullness, satiety and motivation to eat were reported on a 100-mm visual analog scale...
January 2018: Endocrine Connections
Mary Bates
The human gut is home to an abundant and diverse community of microbes–each of us carries roughly 100 trillion, representing more than 1,000 different species. The composition of one?s gut microbiota is individually specific, dynamic, and influenced by genetics, diet, age, metabolism, medication use, stress, and geography. These bacteria perform a range of necessary and beneficial functions, including breaking down our food and supporting our immune systems.
November 2017: IEEE Pulse
Megan Cully
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
October 30, 2017: Nature Reviews. Drug Discovery
Wulf Palinski
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
November 2017: Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis, and Vascular Biology
Karin Lundgren-Kownacki, Mats Dahl, Chuansi Gao, Kristina Jakobsson, Caroline Linninge, Danping Song, Kalev Kuklane
It is common practice in India to consume the dairy drink buttermilk as a way of mitigating occupational heat strain. This paper explores the thermoregulatory and hydration benefits of drinking buttermilk but also the impacts of work in a hot environment on the gut microbiota, renal and cognitive function. Twelve healthy participants were subjected to a 3-hour period of medium load physical intermittent work in a climatic chamber (34°C, 60 % RH). The subjects were given water, buttermilk (700 ml) or no rehydration at random...
October 20, 2017: Industrial Health
Antonio M Calafiore, Carlo De Filippo, Massimiliano Foschi, Fabrizio Tancredi, Michele Di Mauro
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
September 23, 2017: Journal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery
Ana M Abreu, Matteo Candidi, Salvatore M Aglioti
Programming and executing a subsequent move is inherently linked to the ability to anticipate the actions of others when interacting. Such fundamental social ability is particularly important in sport. Here, we discuss the possible mechanisms behind the highly sophisticated anticipation skills that characterize experts. We contend that prediction in sports might rely on a finely tuned perceptual system that endows experts with a fast, partially unconscious, pickup of relevant cues. Furthermore, we discuss the role of the multimodal, perceptuomotor, multiple-duty cells (mirror neurons) that play an important function in action anticipation by means of an inner motor simulation process...
2017: Progress in Brain Research
Dietmar Boethig, Hartmut Hecker
Prospective randomized controlled trials are difficult to obtain if a promising new therapy has to be tested against seemingly obsolete alternatives. One method to address this problem is to compare the results of (multicentre) trials to literature results. However, previous treatment-era changes and population-dependent results complicate objective comparisons. The presented approach describes a method to objectify such comparisons in cases in which individual raw data regarding a new therapy have to be compared to summary results regarding a conventional alternative published in the literature...
January 1, 2017: Statistical Methods in Medical Research
Aaron Lerner, Sandra Neidhöfer, Torsten Matthias
Objectives: To comprehensively review the scientific knowledge on the gut-brain axis. Methods: Various publications on the gut-brain axis, until 31 July 2017, were screened using the Medline, Google, and Cochrane Library databases. The search was performed using the following keywords: "gut-brain axis", "gut-microbiota-brain axis", "nutrition microbiome/microbiota", "enteric nervous system", "enteric glial cells/network", "gut-brain pathways", "microbiome immune system", "microbiome neuroendocrine system" and "intestinal/gut/enteric neuropeptides"...
October 12, 2017: Microorganisms
Amanda J Dillard, Rebecca A Ferrer, Jessica D Welch
OBJECTIVE: Narrative messages may be an effective strategy to increase risk perceptions and motivate preventive behaviours related to cancer. The aim of this research was to examine associations between narrative transportation (i.e. psychological absorption into a narrative), risk perceptions, and intentions following narrative messages about skin cancer. DESIGN: In two studies, women who reported indoor tanning read first-person narrative messages about skin cancer...
October 4, 2017: Psychology & Health
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