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Chronic coronary disease

Ying Shen, Feng Hua Ding, Rui Yan Zhang, Qi Zhang, Lin Lu, Wei Feng Shen
The data presented here support the research article "Association of serum mimecan with angiographic coronary collateralization in patients with stable coronary artery disease and chronic total occlusion" (Shen et al., 2016) [1] where elevated circulating mimecan levels reflected poor angiographic coronary collateralization in such patients. The data included in this article are composed by one figure and consist of (1) validation of serum mimecan measurement by assessing inter- and intra-assay variability in 45 samples; (2) findings on the relation of clinical and angiographic characteristics and biochemical parameters to coronary collateralization in 559 patients; (3) the diagnostic value of serum mimecan for poor collateralization, which was derived from plotting receiver-operating characteristic curves and logistic regression analysis...
December 2016: Data in Brief
Daniel J Friedman, Haikun Bao, Erica S Spatz, Jeptha P Curtis, James P Daubert, Sana M Al-Khatib
BACKGROUND: -A prolonged PR interval is common among cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) candidates; however, the association between PR interval and outcomes is unclear, and data are conflicting. METHODS: -We conducted inverse probability weighted (IPW) analyses of 26,451 CRT eligible (EF≤35, QRS≥120ms) patients from the National Cardiovascular Data Registry ICD Registry to assess the association between a prolonged PR interval (≥230ms), receipt of CRT with defibrillator (CRT-D) versus implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD), and outcomes...
October 19, 2016: Circulation
Marina Pieri, Alessandro Belletti, Fabrizio Monaco, Antonio Pisano, Mario Musu, Veronica Dalessandro, Giacomo Monti, Gabriele Finco, Alberto Zangrillo, Giovanni Landoni
BACKGROUND: In patients undergoing cardiac surgery, a reduced preoperative left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) is common and is associated with a worse outcome. Available outcome data for these patients address specific surgical procedures, mainly coronary artery bypass graft (CABG). Aim of our study was to investigate perioperative outcome of surgery on patients with low pre-operative LVEF undergoing a broad range of cardiac surgical procedures. METHODS: Data from patients with pre-operative LVEF ≤40 % undergoing cardiac surgery at a university hospital were reviewed and analyzed...
October 18, 2016: BMC Anesthesiology
Lucia Barbieri, Monica Verdoia, Alon Schaffer, Harry Suryapranata, Giuseppe De Luca
BACKGROUND: Patients with coronary artery disease who undergo stent implantation and have concomitant indication for long-term oral anticoagulation represent a considerable proportion of the overall population. To date there is still no consensus about the optimal antithrombotic strategy to choose in this kind of patients, due to the difficult balance between an increased risk of bleeding and thromboembolic complications. Therefore, the aim of this study was to perform a meta-analysis to evaluate the risk and benefits of triple antithrombotic therapy versus dual antithrombotic therapy in patients undergoing coronary stent implantation, requiring long-term oral anticoagulation...
October 18, 2016: Cardiovascular Drugs and Therapy
Mark A Groh, Ivan Diaz, Alan M Johnson, Stephen W Ely, Oliver A Binns, Gerard L Champsaur
BACKGROUND: Patients at intermediate risk (IR) according to The Society of Thoracic Surgeons risk score are today frequently oriented toward the transfemoral aortic valve replacement (TAVR) option. Our goal was to evaluate the best treatment strategies for IR patients with severe aortic stenosis. METHODS: Of a consecutive series of 1,144 surgical aortic valve replacements (AVRs) performed in our institution between 2008 and 2014, we reviewed the early and late outcomes of two different groups: a low-risk (LR) group of 470 patients, and an IR group of 620...
October 15, 2016: Annals of Thoracic Surgery
James Sapontis, Steven P Marso, David J Cohen, William Lombardi, Dimitri Karmpaliotis, Jeffrey Moses, William J Nicholson, Ashish Pershad, R Michael Wyman, Anthony Spaedy, Stephen Cook, Parag Doshi, Robert Federici, Craig R Thompson, Karen Nugent, Kensey Gosch, John A Spertus, J Aaron Grantham
BACKGROUND: Patients with chronic total occlusions of a coronary artery represent a complex, yet common, clinical conundrum among patients with ischemic heart disease. Chronic total occlusion angioplasty is increasingly being used as a treatment for these complex lesions. There is a compelling need to better quantify the safety, efficacy, benefits, and costs of the procedure. METHODS: To address these gaps in knowledge, we designed the Outcomes, Patient Health Status, and Efficiency IN Chronic Total Occlusion Hybrid Procedures (OPEN CTO) study, an investigator-initiated multicenter, single-arm registry including 12 centers with a planned enrollment of 1000 patients...
October 13, 2016: Coronary Artery Disease
Nilson T Poppi, Luís H W Gowdak, Luciana O C Dourado, Eduardo L Adam, Thiago N P Leite, Bruno M Mioto, José E Krieger, Luiz A M César, Alexandre C Pereira
BACKGROUND: The predictors of cardiovascular events in patients with chronic refractory angina are limited. High-sensitivity cardiac troponin T (hs-cTnT) assays are biomarkers that may be used to determine the prognosis of patients with stable coronary artery disease. HYPOTHESIS: Hs-cTnT is a predictor of death and nonfatal myocardial infarction (MI) in patients with refractory angina. METHODS: We prospectively enrolled 117 consecutive patients in this study...
October 18, 2016: Clinical Cardiology
Chan Joo Lee, Jaewon Oh, Sang-Hak Lee, Seok-Min Kang, Donghoon Choi, Hyeon-Chang Kim, Sungha Park
OBJECTIVE: In most cases, the 5 first line drugs are recommended for management of hypertension without preference for one or the other. However, it is unclear whether different classes of anti-hypertensive agents have different effect on survival in low risk, uncomplicated hypertension. The aim of this study was to evaluate effects of 4 classes of first line anti-hypertensive agents on improving survival in patients with low risk, uncomplicated hypertension. DESIGN AND METHOD: Adult hypertensive patients without chronic kidney disease, end stage renal disease, diabetes mellitus, acute coronary syndrome, and heart failure in 2002 were selected from Korean National Health Insurance sample cohort consisting of one million subjects...
September 2016: Journal of Hypertension
Donghoon Choi
: Atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis is an increasingly recognized medical problem especially in elderly patients. It commonly occurs with systemic manifestations including hypertension (HTN), chronic kidney disease (CKD) or atherosclerotic diseases including coronary or peripheral artery disease. Significant renal artery stenosis may result in HTN, ischemic nephropathy, however it is still in debate about the benefit of revascularization. Although several randomized controlled trials including Angioplasty and Stenting for Renal Artery Lesions (ASTRAL) and Cardiovascular Outcomes in Renal Atherosclerotic Lesions (CORAL) study has failed to reveal a significant benefit of angioplasty, angioplasty with medical therapy is increasingly accepted in some patients with certain clinical conditions...
September 2016: Journal of Hypertension
Paul Whelton
BACKGROUND: Choice of the optimal target for blood pressure (BP) reduction during treatment of patients with hypertension, including those with underlying co-morbid conditions, is an important challenge in clinical practice. The Systolic Blood Pressure Intervention Trial (SPRINT) was designed to provide guidance in selection of a Systolic BP target during treatment of hypertension. METHODS: Adults ≥50 years old with hypertension and at least one additional risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD), but excluding persons with diabetes mellitus, prior stroke, or advanced chronic kidney disease (CKD) were randomly assigned to intensive therapy (intensive), targeting a systolic BP (SBP) <120 mmHg, or standard therapy (standard), targeting a SBP <140 mmHg...
September 2016: Journal of Hypertension
Suzanne Oparil
Heart disease, stroke, and kidney failure are leading causes of death worldwide, and hypertension is a significant risk factor for each. Hypertension is less common in women, compared to men, in those younger than 45 years of age. This trend is reversed in those 65 years and older. In the US between 2011-2014, the prevalence of hypertension in women and men by age group was 6% vs 8% (18-39 years), 30% vs 35% (40-59 years), and 67% vs 63% (60 years and over). Awareness, treatment, and control rates differ between genders with women being more aware of their diagnosis (85% vs 80%), more likely to take their medications (81% vs 71%) and more frequently having controlled hypertension (55% vs 49%)...
September 2016: Journal of Hypertension
Ernesto Schiffrin
Hypertension has been defined by the levels of BP above which lowering BP will reduce the cardiovascular risk associated with elevated BP. This level has been classically 140/90 mmHg on the basis of actuarial data from the insurance industry. However, we now know that cardiovascular risk rises progressively from levels as low as 115/75 mmHg upward with a doubling of the incidence of both coronary heart disease and stroke for every 20/10-mmHg increment of BP. In uncomplicated hypertension without cardiovascular risk factors or target organ damage, there is little randomized clinical trial evidence that lowering SBP of <160 mmHg reduces cardiovascular risk...
September 2016: Journal of Hypertension
William C Cushman
Beginning with the Veterans Administration (VA) Cooperative Hypertension Study of the 1960 s, blood pressure (BP) lowering with antihypertensive medications has been shown to reduce major cardiovascular (CV) outcomes, including coronary heart disease, stroke, heart failure (HF) and CV and all-cause mortality in randomized controlled CV outcome trials. Multiple drugs were usually required in these trials to lower BP in treated participants. Medication regimens in the early trials, including the VA trial, included a thiazide-type diuretic (TTD) as initial therapy...
September 2016: Journal of Hypertension
Enrico Agabiti Rosei
Current Hypertension Guidelines emphasize the importance of assessing the presence of preclinical organ damage. In fact, an extensive evaluation of organ damage may increase the number of patients classified at high CV risk and therefore strongly influence the clinical management of patients. Hypertensive heart disease remains to date the form of organ damage for which there is the greatest amount of evidence of a strong independent prognostic significance. In the presence of a chronic pressure overload, a parallel addition of sarcomers takes place with an increase in myocyte width, which in turn increases left ventricular wall thickness; myocyte hypertrophy is also associated with apoptosis, collagen deposition and ventricular fibrosis with an impairment of coronary hemodynamics as well, thus profoundly influencing functional properties of the left (and right) ventricle...
September 2016: Journal of Hypertension
Yuichiro Yano
Younger adults (ages ≤50 years) are increasingly prone to stroke, chronic kidney disease (CKD), and worsening cardiovascular disease (CVD) mortality in the US. An alarming increase in prevalence of high blood pressure (BP) related to the obesity epidemic appears to underlie these adverse trends. However, what specific BP characteristics measured in young adulthood optimally predict incident CVD and CKD later in life remains to be determined. Therefore, an optimization of diagnostic and therapeutic strategies in BP management for young adults is challenging but essential...
September 2016: Journal of Hypertension
Sang-Chol Lee
Chronic hypertension can result in deleterious effects on various vascular organs including the heart and vessels. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) has the unique advantage of the ability to assess ventricular volumes and function, valvular abnormalities, vascular pathology, myocardial perfusion and tissue characterization with high accuracy and reproducibility and also avoid the risk of radiation. As this is the case, CMR seems to be an ideal method for comprehensive assessment of patients with systemic hypertension...
September 2016: Journal of Hypertension
Yook Chin Chia
: Many cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk prediction tools have been developed in an attempt to identify those at highest risk in order for them to benefit from interventional treatment. The first CVD risk tool that was developed was the coronary heart disease risk tool by the Framingham Heart Study in 1998 (1). However the Framingham Risk Score could overestimate (or underestimate) risk in populations other than the US population. Hence several other risk engines have also been developed, primarily for a better fit in the communities in which the tools are to be used (2, 3)...
September 2016: Journal of Hypertension
Martin Möckel, Julia Searle, Henning Thomas Baberg, Peter Dirschedl, Benny Levenson, Jürgen Malzahn, Thomas Mansky, Christian Günster, Elke Jeschke
OBJECTIVES: We aimed to analyse the short-term and long-term outcome of patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) undergoing percutaneous intervention (PCI) as compared to coronary artery bypass surgery (CABG) to evaluate the optimal coronary revascularisation strategy. DESIGN: Retrospective analysis of routine statutory health insurance data between 2010 and 2012. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Primary outcome was adjusted all-cause mortality after 30 days and major adverse cardiovascular and cerebrovascular events at 1 year...
2016: Open Heart
Cheng Sun, Heng Zhang, Zhe Zheng
PURPOSE OF REVIEW: The efficacy and safety of β-blockers in the treatment of cardiovascular diseases, such as ischemic heart disease, cardiac arrhythmias, and heart failure, have been well established for decades. In this article, we review the current opinions on the application of β-blockers for secondary prevention in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) surgery. RECENT FINDINGS: As the average age of patients treated surgically for coronary artery disease (CAD) is increasing, it is not uncommon to have candidates for CABG presenting with concomitant atrial fibrillation, heart failure or hypertension, most of which were caused by excessive activation of the adrenergic nervous system...
November 2016: Current Opinion in Cardiology
Domenico Maurizio Toraldo, Michele De Benedetto, Luana Conte, Francesco De Nuccio
Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is characterized by repetitive interruptions of breathing, causing a Chronic Intermittent Hypoxia (CIH) that can be a key step in the development and progression of cardiovascular diseases. Nowadays, in fact, there is scientific evidence showing the close relationship between OSA and atherosclerosis, even in those patients who do not show co-morbidities such as hypertension, diabetes, high levels of low-density lipoprotein (LDL), cigarette smoking and obesity, which normally are able to activate the endothelium...
October 7, 2016: Current Vascular Pharmacology
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