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Sleep Spindles

Rebecca S Nader, Anthony L Murkar, Carlyle T Smith
Recent research has suggested that some of the inter-individual variation in sleep spindle activity is due to innate learning ability. Sleep spindles have also been observed to vary following learning in both young and older adults. We examined the effect of procedural task acquisition on sleep stages and on sleep spindles in an adolescent sample. Participants were 32 adolescents (17 females) between the ages of 12 and 19 years. Spindle activity was examined in three different frequency ranges: 11.00-13.50 Hz (slow), 13...
2016: Frontiers in Psychology
Birgit Kleim, Julia Wysokowsky, Nuria Schmid, Erich Seifritz, Björn Rasch
STUDY OBJECTIVE: To investigate sleep's effect in the immediate aftermath of experiencing an analog trauma in the laboratory on reducing intrusive emotional memory formation. METHODS: Sixty-five healthy women were exposed to an experimental laboratory trauma. They viewed a neutral and a trauma film in the laboratory and were randomly allocated to either a group that slept following film viewing or a group that remained awake. Sleep was recorded with electroencephalogram in a subgroup of participants in the sleep group...
October 10, 2016: Sleep
Nicolas Fraize, Julien Carponcy, Mickaël Antoine Joseph, Jean-Christophe Comte, Pierre-Hervé Luppi, Paul-Antoine Libourel, Paul-Antoine Salin, Gaël Malleret, Régis Parmentier
STUDY OBJECTIVES: It is commonly accepted that sleep is beneficial to memory processes, but it is still unclear if this benefit originates from improved memory consolidation or enhanced information processing. It has thus been proposed that sleep may also promote forgetting of undesirable and non-essential memories, a process required for optimization of cognitive resources. We tested the hypothesis that non-rapid eye movement sleep (NREMS) promotes forgetting of irrelevant information, more specifically when processing information in working memory (WM), while REM sleep (REMS) facilitates the consolidation of important information...
October 10, 2016: Sleep
Katharina Zinke, Ines Wilhelm, Müge Bayramoglu, Susanne Klein, Jan Born
Sleep is considered to support the formation of skill memory. In juvenile but not adult song birds learning a tutor's song, a stronger initial deterioration of song performance over night-sleep predicts better song performance in the long run. This and similar observations have stimulated the view of sleep supporting skill formation during development in an unsupervised off-line learning process that, in the absence of external feedback, can initially also enhance inaccuracies in skill performance. Here we explored whether in children learning a motor sequence task, as in song-learning juvenile birds, changes across sleep after initial practice predict performance levels achieved in the long run...
October 16, 2016: Developmental Science
Robert G Averkin, Viktor Szemenyei, Sándor Bordé, Gábor Tamás
Ultra-high-frequency network events in the hippocampus are instrumental in a dialogue with the neocortex during memory formation, but the existence of transient ∼200 Hz network events in the neocortex is not clear. Our recordings from neocortical layer II/III of freely behaving rats revealed field potential events at ripple and high-gamma frequencies repeatedly occurring at troughs of spindle oscillations during sleep. Juxtacellular recordings identified subpopulations of fast-spiking, parvalbumin-containing basket cells with epochs of firing at ripple (∼200 Hz) and high-gamma (∼120 Hz) frequencies detected during spindles and centered with millisecond precision at the trough of spindle waves in phase with field potential events but phase shifted relative to pyramidal cell firing...
October 12, 2016: Neuron
Oluwaseun Akeju, Seong-Eun Kim, Rafael Vazquez, James Rhee, Kara J Pavone, Lauren E Hobbs, Patrick L Purdon, Emery N Brown
An improved understanding of the neural correlates of altered arousal states is fundamental for precise brain state targeting in clinical settings. More specifically, electroencephalogram recordings are now increasingly being used to relate drug-specific oscillatory dynamics to clinically desired altered arousal states. Dexmedetomidine is an anesthetic adjunct typically administered in operating rooms and intensive care units to produce and maintain a sedative brain state. However, a high-density electroencephalogram characterization of the neural correlates of the dexmedetomidine-induced altered arousal state has not been previously accomplished...
2016: PloS One
William I Wooten, Marianne S Muhlebach, Joseph Muenzer, Ceila E Loughlin, Bradley V Vaughn
Mucolipidosis II (Inclusion cell or I-cell disease) is an autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disorder clinically comparable to the mucopolysaccharidoses (MPS), characterized by progressive respiratory and neurologic deterioration. Sleep problems, especially obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and disrupted sleep architecture, are observed in other lysosomal storage diseases but have not been described in mucolipidosis II. We report the progression of polysomnographic abnormalities in a child with mucolipidosis II, demonstrated by worsening sleep-related hypoventilation, OSA, and sleep state fragmentation despite advancing PAP therapy...
September 29, 2016: Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine: JCSM: Official Publication of the American Academy of Sleep Medicine
Pedro Andrade, Jari Nissinen, Asla Pitkanen
Sleep disturbances commonly occur after traumatic brain injury and may predispose patients to epileptic seizures. We hypothesized that unprovoked seizure occurrence after traumatic brain injury depends on the sleep-wake cycle, and that the electrographic characteristics of a given sleep stage provide biomarkers for post-traumatic epilepsy. We show in a rat lateral fluid-percussion model that 92% of spontaneous generalized seizures occur during the transition from stage III to rapid-eye-movement sleep. Moreover, a reduction in spindle duration and dominant frequency during the transition stage present as specific and sensitive non-invasive biomarkers for experimentally induced post-traumatic epilepsy with generalized electrographic seizures...
October 5, 2016: Journal of Neurotrauma
Fabio Ferrarelli, Giulio Tononi
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
October 15, 2016: Biological Psychiatry
Charmaine Demanuele, Ullrich Bartsch, Bengi Baran, Sheraz Khan, Mark G Vangel, Roy Cox, Matti Hämäläinen, Matthew W Jones, Robert Stickgold, Dara S Manoach
STUDY OBJECTIVES: Schizophrenia patients have correlated deficits in sleep spindle density and sleep-dependent memory consolidation. In addition to spindle density, memory consolidation is thought to rely on the precise temporal coordination of spindles with slow waves (SWs). We investigated whether this coordination is intact in schizophrenia and its relation to motor procedural memory consolidation. METHODS: Twenty-one chronic medicated schizophrenia patients and 17 demographically-matched healthy controls underwent two nights of polysomnography with training on the finger tapping motor sequence task (MST) on the second night and testing the following morning...
September 9, 2016: Sleep
Zhuo Fang, Valya Sergeeva, Laura B Ray, Jeremy Viczko, Adrian M Owen, Stuart M Fogel
Sleep spindles-short, phasic, oscillatory bursts of activity that characterize non-rapid eye movement sleep-are one of the only electrophysiological oscillations identified as a biological marker of human intelligence (e.g., cognitive abilities commonly assessed using intelligence quotient tests). However, spindles are also important for sleep maintenance and are modulated by circadian factors. Thus, the possibility remains that the relationship between spindles and intelligence quotient may be an epiphenomenon of a putative relationship between good quality sleep and cognitive ability or perhaps modulated by circadian factors such as morningness-eveningness tendencies...
September 14, 2016: Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience
Ping Chai Koo, Lisa Marshall
Sleep spindles were one of the first rhythms associated with learning and memory consolidation. Current research shows spindles can reflect features of trait and time-varying properties of neuroplasticity. A new study has now used feedback-controlled spindle frequency stimulation to show that sleep spindles modulate endogenous brain electric activity and behavior.
September 12, 2016: Current Biology: CB
Alessandro Barardi, Jordi Garcia-Ojalvo, Alberto Mazzoni
The thalamus is a key brain element in the processing of sensory information. During the sleep and awake states, this brain area is characterized by the presence of two distinct dynamical regimes: in the sleep state activity is dominated by spindle oscillations (7 - 15 Hz) weakly affected by external stimuli, while in the awake state the activity is primarily driven by external stimuli. Here we develop a simple and computationally efficient model of the thalamus that exhibits two dynamical regimes with different information-processing capabilities, and study the transition between them...
2016: PloS One
Michael Schellenberger Costa, Arne Weigenand, Hong-Viet V Ngo, Lisa Marshall, Jan Born, Thomas Martinetz, Jens Christian Claussen
Few models exist that accurately reproduce the complex rhythms of the thalamocortical system that are apparent in measured scalp EEG and at the same time, are suitable for large-scale simulations of brain activity. Here, we present a neural mass model of the thalamocortical system during natural non-REM sleep, which is able to generate fast sleep spindles (12-15 Hz), slow oscillations (<1 Hz) and K-complexes, as well as their distinct temporal relations, and response to auditory stimuli. We show that with the inclusion of detailed calcium currents, the thalamic neural mass model is able to generate different firing modes, and validate the model with EEG-data from a recent sleep study in humans, where closed-loop auditory stimulation was applied...
September 2016: PLoS Computational Biology
Claudia Schilling, Manuel Schlipf, Simone Spietzack, Franziska Rausch, Sarah Eisenacher, Susanne Englisch, Iris Reinhard, Leila Haller, Oliver Grimm, Michael Deuschle, Heike Tost, Mathias Zink, Andreas Meyer-Lindenberg, Michael Schredl
Several studies in patients with schizophrenia reported a marked reduction in sleep spindle activity. To investigate whether the reduction may be linked to genetic risk of the illness, we analysed sleep spindle activity in healthy volunteers, patients with schizophrenia and first-degree relatives, who share an enriched set of schizophrenia susceptibility genes. We further investigated the correlation of spindle activity with cognitive function in first-degree relatives and whether spindle abnormalities affect both fast (12-15 Hz) and slow (9-12 Hz) sleep spindles...
August 26, 2016: European Archives of Psychiatry and Clinical Neuroscience
A R Weighall, L M Henderson, D J Barr, S A Cairney, M G Gaskell
Lexical competition is a hallmark of proficient, automatic word recognition. Previous research suggests that there is a delay before a new spoken word becomes engaged in this process, with sleep playing an important role. However, data from one method - the visual world paradigm - consistently show competition without a delay. We trained 42 adults and 40 children (aged 7-8) on novel word-object pairings, and employed this paradigm to measure the time-course of lexical competition. Fixations to novel objects upon hearing existing words (e...
August 22, 2016: Brain and Language
Lia Mesbah-Oskui, Richard L Horner
BACKGROUND: Alterations in thalamic γ-aminobutyric acid-mediated signaling are thought to underlie the increased frontal α-β frequency electrocortical activity that signals anesthetic-induced loss of consciousness with γ-aminobutyric acid receptor type A (GABAAR)-targeting general anesthetics. The general anesthetic etomidate elicits phasic extrasynaptic GABAAR activation ("spillover" inhibition) at thalamocortical neurons in vitro. We hypothesize that this action of etomidate at the thalamus is sufficient to trigger an increase in frontal α-β frequency electrocortical activity and that this effect of etomidate is fully recapitulated by enhanced thalamic spillover inhibition in vivo...
November 2016: Anesthesiology
Wei Jing, Yanran Wang, Guangzhan Fang, Mingming Chen, Miaomiao Xue, Daqing Guo, Dezhong Yao, Yang Xia
Accumulating evidence reveals that neuronal oscillations with various frequency bands in the brain have different physiological functions. However, the frequency band divisions in rats were typically based on empirical spectral distribution from limited channels information. In the present study, functionally relevant frequency bands across vigilance states and brain regions were identified using factor analysis based on 9 channels EEG signals recorded from multiple brain areas in rats. We found that frequency band divisions varied both across vigilance states and brain regions...
2016: Frontiers in Computational Neuroscience
Sara Mahvash Mohammadi, Samaneh Kouchaki, Mohammad Ghavami, Saeid Sanei
BACKGROUND: Manual sleep scoring is deemed to be tedious and time consuming. Even among automatic methods such as Time-Frequency (T-F) representations, there is still room for more improvement. NEW METHOD: To optimise the efficiency of T-F domain analysis of sleep electroencephalography (EEG) a novel approach for automatically identifying the brain waves, sleep spindles, and K-complexes from the sleep EEG signals is proposed. The proposed method is based on singular spectrum analysis (SSA)...
August 12, 2016: Journal of Neuroscience Methods
Dorothée Coppieters 't Wallant, Pierre Maquet, Christophe Phillips
Sleep spindle is a peculiar oscillatory brain pattern which has been associated with a number of sleep (isolation from exteroceptive stimuli, memory consolidation) and individual characteristics (intellectual quotient). Oddly enough, the definition of a spindle is both incomplete and restrictive. In consequence, there is no consensus about how to detect spindles. Visual scoring is cumbersome and user dependent. To analyze spindle activity in a more robust way, automatic sleep spindle detection methods are essential...
2016: Neural Plasticity
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