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Medical education, training, school

Kenneth F Baker, Sharmila Jandial, Ben Thompson, David Walker, Ken Taylor, Helen E Foster
BACKGROUND: Structured examination routines have been developed as educational resources for musculoskeletal clinical skills teaching, including Gait-Arms-Legs-Spine (GALS), Regional Examination of the Musculoskeletal System (REMS) and paediatric GALS (pGALS). In this study, we aimed to assess the awareness and use of these examination routines in undergraduate medical teaching in UK medical schools and UK postgraduate clinical practice. METHODS: Electronic questionnaires were distributed to adult and paediatric musculoskeletal teaching leads at UK medical schools and current UK doctors in training...
October 21, 2016: BMC Medical Education
Bayan Sharif-Chan, Dipti Tankala, Christine Leong, Zubin Austin, Marisa Battistella
Objective. To compare peer teaching in a medical and a pharmacy clinical teaching unit and to provide suggestions for future research in pharmacy near-peer teaching. Methods. This exploratory observational study used principles of ethnographic methodology for data collection and analysis. Observations were collected in a large downtown teaching hospital. An average of 4-6 hours per day were spent observing a team of medical trainees from the Faculty (School) of Medicine in the general internal medicine (unit for two weeks, followed by a team of pharmacy trainees in an ambulatory hemodialysis (HD) unit for two weeks...
September 25, 2016: American Journal of Pharmaceutical Education
Volkan Coskun, Ellen M Carpenter
The last 40 years have seen a remarkable increase in the teaching of neuroscience at the undergraduate level. From its origins as a component of anatomy or physiology departments to its current status as an independent interdisciplinary field, neuroscience has become the chosen field of study for many undergraduate students, particularly for those interested in medical school or graduate school in neuroscience or related fields. We examined how life science-based neuroscience education is offered at large public universities in the Western United States...
December 2016: Journal of Neuroscience Research
Paul E Farmer, Joseph J Rhatigan
Shortages of trained health care workers plague low- and middle-income countries around the world. When resources are scarce, the ability to support medical education is severely constrained. While there are many important "building blocks" of health systems that need to be bolstered in low- and middle-income countries, the authors propose that U.S. academic medicine can make unique contributions in the realm of human resource development-specifically, increasing the supply of physicians who directly provide health care to the populations they serve and who often manage and lead these health systems...
October 4, 2016: Academic Medicine: Journal of the Association of American Medical Colleges
Charles A Mkony, Ephata E Kaaya, Alex J Goodell, Sarah B Macfarlane
BACKGROUND: Faced with one of the lowest physician-to-population ratios in the world, the Government of Tanzania is urging its medical schools to train more physicians. The annual number of medical students admitted across the country rose from 55 in the 1990s to 1,680 approved places for the 2015/16 academic year. These escalating numbers strain existing faculty. OBJECTIVE: To describe the availability of faculty in medical schools in Tanzania. DESIGN: We identified faculty lists published on the Internet by five Tanzanian medical schools for the 2011/12 academic year and analyzed the appointment status, rank, discipline, and qualifications of faculty members...
2016: Global Health Action
Jean Christophe Rusatira, Brian Tomaszewski, Vincent Dusabejambo, Vincent Ndayiragije, Snedden Gonsalves, Aishwarya Sawant, Angeline Mumararungu, George Gasana, Etienne Amendezo, Anne Haake, Leon Mutesa
BACKGROUND: Lack of access to health and medical education resources for doctors in the developing world is a serious global health problem. In Rwanda, with a population of 11 million, there is only one medical school, hence a shortage in well-trained medical staff. The growth of interactive health technologies has played a role in the improvement of health care in developed countries and has offered alternative ways to offer continuous medical education while improving patient's care...
June 1, 2016: JMIR Med Educ
Jacqueline M Van Wyk, Soornarain S Naidoo, Kogie Moodley, Susan B Higgins-Opitz
INTRODUCTION: Following policy implementations to redress previous racial and gender discrepancies, this study explored how gender impacted on the clinical experiences of final-year medical students during their undergraduate training. It also gathered their perceptions and expectations for the future. METHODS: This cross-sectional, mixed-method study used a purposive sampling method to collect data from the participants (n=94). Each respondent was interviewed by two members of the research team...
2016: Advances in Medical Education and Practice
Nicole A Sitkin, John E Pachankis
PURPOSE: Sexual and gender minorities (SGMs) in medicine experience unique stressors in training. However, little is known about SGM specialty choice. This study examined predictors of SGM specialty choice, associations between specialty prestige and perceived SGM inclusion, and self-reported influences on specialty choice. METHODS: Medical trainees and practitioners (358 SGM, 1528 non-SGM) were surveyed online. We operationalized specialty choice at the individual level as respondents' specialty of practice; at the specialty level, as a percentage of SGM respondents in each specialty...
October 11, 2016: LGBT Health
Ayşen Esen Danacı, Kuzeymen Balıkçı, Orkun Aydın, Cengiz Cengisiz, A Burak Uykur
OBJECTIVE: It has been widely acknowledged that the community and health professionals hold negative attitudes toward patients with impaired mental health. This constitutes a majör obstacle for those patients in coping with their disease, managing their care, and hence regulating their lives. Although studies carried out in Turkey document the presence of stigma, they provide limited information about the ways for solving this problem. Drawing on the litrature, the present study investigated the effect of medical education on stigmatization...
2016: Türk Psikiyatri Dergisi, Turkish Journal of Psychiatry
Matthew S Delfiner, Luis R Martinez, Charles S Pavia
BACKGROUND: Laboratory diagnostic tests have an essential role in patient care, and the increasing number of medical and health professions schools focusing on teaching laboratory medicine to pre-clinical students reflects this importance. However, data validating the pedagogical methods that best influence students' comprehension and interpretation of diagnostic tests have not been well described. The Gram stain is a simple yet significant and frequently used diagnostic test in the clinical setting that helps classify bacteria into two major groups, Gram positive and negative, based on their cell wall structure...
2016: PloS One
Fonda G Robinson, Larry L Cunningham, Sharon P Turner, John Lindroth, Deborah Ray, Talib Khan, Audrey Yates
The term "lean production," also known as "Lean," describes a process of operations management pioneered at the Toyota Motor Company that contributed significantly to the success of the company. Although developed by Toyota, the Lean process has been implemented at many other organizations, including those in health care, and should be considered by dental schools in evaluating their clinical operations. Lean combines engineering principles with operations management and improvement tools to optimize business and operating processes...
October 2016: Journal of Dental Education
V Cantisani, C F Dietrich, R Badea, S Dudea, H Prosch, E Cerezo, D Nuernberg, A L Serra, P S Sidhu, M Radzina, F Piscaglia, M Bachmann Nielsen, C Ewertsen, A Săftoiu, F Calliada, O H Gilja
The European Federation of Societies for Ultrasound in Medicine and Biology (EFSUMB) recommends that ultrasound should be used systematically as an easy accessible and instructive educational tool in the curriculum of modern medical schools. Medical students should acquire theoretical knowledge of the modality and hands-on training should be implemented and adhere to evidence-based principles. In this paper we report EFSUMB policy statements on medical student education in ultrasound that in a short version is already published in Ultraschall in der Medizin 1...
March 2016: Ultrasound Int Open
Eric J Wright, Rohit K Khosla, Lori Howell, Gordon K Lee
BACKGROUND: Comprehensive aesthetic surgery training continues to be a challenge for residency programs. Our residency program developed a rhinoplasty-based objective structured clinical examination (OSCE) based upon validated methods as part of the residency education curriculum. We report our experience with the rhinoplasty-based OSCE and offer guidance to its incorporation within residency programs. METHODS: The encounter involved resident evaluation and operative planning for a standardized patient desiring a rhinoplasty procedure...
September 2016: Archives of Plastic Surgery
Shmuel Reis, Jacob Urkin, Rachel Nave, Rosalie Ber, Amitai Ziv, Orit Karnieli-Miller, Dafna Meitar, Peter Gilbey, Dror Mevorach
ABSTRACT: We reviewed the existing programs for basic medical education (BME) in Israel as well as their output, since they are in a phase of reassessment and transition. The transition has been informed, in part, by evaluation in 2014 by an International Review Committee (IRC). The review is followed by an analysis of its implications as well as the emergent roadmap for the future. The review documents a trend of modernizing, humanizing, and professionalizing Israeli medical education in general, and BME in particular, independently in each of the medical schools...
2016: Israel Journal of Health Policy Research
Katharine Reid, David Smallwood, Margo Collins, Ruth Sutherland, Agnes Dodds
BACKGROUND: To ensure the rigour of objective structured clinical examinations (OSCEs) in assessing medical students, medical school educators must educate examiners with a view to standardising examiner assessment behaviour. Delivering OSCE examiner training is a necessary yet challenging part of the OSCE process. A novel approach to implementing training for current and potential OSCE examiners was trialled by delivering large-group education sessions at major teaching hospitals. METHODS: The 'OSCE Roadshow' comprised a short training session delivered in the context of teaching hospital 'Grand Rounds' to current and potential OSCE examiners...
2016: Medical Education Online
Shin Takayama, Seiichi Ishii, Fumie Takahashi, Natsumi Saito, Ryutaro Arita, Soichiro Kaneko, Masashi Watanabe, Tetsuharu Kamiya, Hidekazu Watanabe, Hitoshi Nishikawa, Yuka Ikeno, Junichi Tanaka, Minoru Ohsawa, Akiko Kikuchi, Takehiro Numata, Hitoshi Kuroda, Michiaki Abe, Takashi Takeda, Nobuo Yaegashi, Tadashi Ishii
Traditional Japanese Kampo medicine has been widely used in clinical practice in Japan. Though it is a compulsory subject in Japanese medical schools, a standard educational program in Kampo medicine does not exist. Tohoku University has incorporated Kampo medicine into clinical education via didactic lectures since 2003; however, student evaluations have been lower for Kampo than for all other clinical specialties. We administered a questionnaire about a Kampo medicine course for fifth-year students from 2009 to 2012 and developed an educational program based on feedback obtained...
2016: Tohoku Journal of Experimental Medicine
Diane K Dao, Adeline L Goss, Andrew S Hoekzema, Lauren A Kelly, Alexander A Logan, Sanjiv D Mehta, Utpal N Sandesara, Michelle R Munyikwa, Horace M DeLisser
Many efforts to design introductory "cultural competence" courses for medical students rely on an information delivery (competence) paradigm, which can exoticize patients while obscuring social context, medical culture, and power structures. Other approaches foster a general open-minded orientation, which can remain nebulous without clear grounding principles. Medical educators are increasingly recognizing the limitations of both approaches and calling for strategies that reenvision cultural competence training...
September 27, 2016: Academic Medicine: Journal of the Association of American Medical Colleges
Jeongeun Jo
After the defeat of the Opium War and the Sino-Japanese War, China's intellectuals realized necessity of modernization (Westernization) to survive in the imperial order of the survival of the fittest. In particular, it was urgent to accept Western medicine and train the doctors who learned Western medicine to change the sick and weary Chinese to be robust. Thus, new occupations of the Western Medicine Group (xiyi, doctors who learned Western medicine) emerged in China. As with the first profession, the new Western Medicine Group tried to define standards of Western medicine and medical profession; however, it was difficult in the absence of the strong central government...
August 2016: Ŭi Sahak
T Ott, I Schmidtmann, T Limbach, P F Gottschling, H Buggenhagen, S Kurz, G Pestel
BACKGROUND: Simulation-based training (SBT) has developed into an established method of medical training. Studies focusing on the education of medical students have used simulation as an evaluation tool for defined skills. A small number of studies provide evidence that SBT improves medical students' skills in the clinical setting. Moreover, they were strictly limited to a few areas, such as the diagnosis of heart murmurs or the correct application of cricoid pressure. Other studies could not prove adequate transferability from the skills gained in SBT to the patient site...
September 27, 2016: Der Anaesthesist
Trusha C Dhanani, Emily H Mantovani, J Rick Turner
All biologically active agents carry the potential to lead to adverse reactions in certain individuals, including serious cardiac adverse reactions. Since 2005, there has been an international regulatory landscape governing the investigation of a new drug's propensity to lead to the polymorphic ventricular tachycardia Torsades de Pointes (Torsades), a rare but potentially fatal occurrence. When a regulatory agency considers it appropriate, warning information is placed in a medicine's patient information leaflet (label) concerning drug-induced QT interval prolongation, a phenomenon associated with Torsades...
September 28, 2016: International Journal of Pharmacy Practice
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