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Snake envenomation

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29142382/capillary-leak-syndrome-following-snakebite-envenomation
#1
REVIEW
V Udayabhaskaran, E T Arun Thomas, Bhagya Shaji
Capillary leak syndrome is a unique complication that follows Russell's viper envenomation. This syndrome has a very high fatality rate and is characterized by parotid swelling, chemosis, periorbital edema, hypotension, albuminuria, hypoalbuminemia, and hemoconcentration. This syndrome is frequently recognized from the southern parts of India, especially from the state of Kerala. It has been postulated that a vascular apoptosis inducing component of Russell's viper venom that is not neutralized by the commercially available anti-snake venom (ASV) is responsible for this complication as it occurs even after adequate doses of ASV administration in most cases...
October 2017: Indian Journal of Critical Care Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29111117/identification-of-b-cell-recognized-linear-epitopes-in-a-snake-venom-serine-proteinase-from-the-central-american-bushmaster-lachesis-stenophrys
#2
M Madrigal, A Alape-Girón, E Barboza-Arguedas, W Aguilar-Ulloa, M Flores-Díaz
Snake venom serine proteinases are toxins that perturb hemostasis acting on proteins from the blood coagulation cascade, the fibrinolytic or the kallikrein-kinin system. Despite the relevance of these enzymes in envenomations by viper bites, the characterization of the antibody response to these toxins at the molecular level has not been previously addressed. In this work surface-located B cell recognized linear epitopes from a Lachesis stenophrys venom serine proteinase (UniProt accession number Q072L7) were predicted using an artificial neuronal network at the ABCpred server, the corresponding peptides were synthesized and their immunoreactivity was analyzed against a panel of experimental and therapeutic antivenoms...
October 27, 2017: Toxicon: Official Journal of the International Society on Toxinology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29102099/white-lipped-tree-viper-cryptelytrops-albolabris-envenomation-in-an-american-viper-keeper
#3
Spencer Greene, Laura Ann Galdamez, Richard Tomasheski
BACKGROUND: Snakebites are common in many regions of the United States. Bites from exotic species, however, are rare. The white-lipped tree viper, Cryptelytrops (formerly Trimeresurus) albolabris, is a pit viper native to Southeast Asia. Bites are common in countries such as Myanmar, India, Thailand, Indonesia, and China. In this report, we describe an envenomation in an American viper keeper. CASE REPORT: A healthy 28-year-old right-handed man who collects venomous snakes experienced a bite to the distal left thumb from a neonatal C...
October 25, 2017: Journal of Emergency Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29082854/acute-myocardial-infarction-associated-with-thrombotic-microangiopathy-following-a-hump-nosed-viper-bite-a-case-report
#4
Nipun Lakshitha de Silva, Lalindra Gooneratne, Eranga Wijewickrama
BACKGROUND: Hump-nosed viper bite is the commonest cause of venomous snakebite in Sri Lanka. Despite initially being considered a moderately venomous snake more recent reports have revealed that it could cause significant systemic envenoming leading to coagulopathy and acute kidney injury. However, myocardial infarction was not reported except for a single case, which occurred immediately after the snakebite. CASE PRESENTATION: A 50-year-old previously healthy Sri Lankan woman had a hump-nosed viper bite with no evidence of systemic envenoming during initial hospital stay...
October 30, 2017: Journal of Medical Case Reports
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29076991/single-chain-antibody-fragment-against-venom-from-the-snake-daboia-russelii-formosensis
#5
Chi-Hsin Lee, Yu-Ching Lee, Yueh-Lun Lee, Sy-Jye Leu, Liang-Tzung Lin, Chi-Ching Chen, Jen-Ron Chiang, Pharaoh Fellow Mwale, Bor-Yu Tsai, Ching-Sheng Hung, Yi-Yuan Yang
Russell's vipers containing hemotoxic and neurotoxic venom commonly cause snake envenomation. Horse-derived antivenom is a specific antidote, but its production is expensive and has side effects. Developing a cost-effective and more tolerable therapeutic strategy is favorable. In this study, using glutaraldehyde-attenuated Daboia russelii formosensis (DRF) venom proteins to immunize chickens, polyclonal yolk-immunoglobulin (IgY) antibodies were generated and showed a specific binding affinity. Phage display technology was used to generate two antibody libraries of single-chain variable fragments (scFvs) containing 3...
October 27, 2017: Toxins
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29072602/isolation-and-functional-characterization-of-an-acidic-myotoxic-phospholipase-a%C3%A2-from-colombian-bothrops-asper-venom
#6
Silvia Posada Arias, Paola Rey-Suárez, Andrés Pereáñez J, Cristian Acosta, Mauricio Rojas, Lucilene Delazari Dos Santos, Rui Seabra Ferreira, Vitelbina Núñez
Myotoxic phospholipases A₂ (PLA₂) are responsible for many clinical manifestations in envenomation by Bothrops snakes. A new myotoxic acidic Asp49 PLA₂ (BaCol PLA₂) was isolated from Colombian Bothrops asper venom using reverse-phase high performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC). BaCol PLA₂ had a molecular mass of 14,180.69 Da (by mass spectrometry) and an isoelectric point of 4.4. The complete amino acid sequence was obtained by cDNA cloning (GenBank accession No. MF319968) and revealed a mature product of 124 amino acids with Asp at position 49...
October 26, 2017: Toxins
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29071226/pharmacological-properties-of-vochysia-haenkeana-vochysiaceae-extract-to-neutralize-the-neuromuscular-blockade-induced-by-bothropstoxin-i-lys49-phospholipase-a2-myotoxin
#7
Carolina Harder, Akila Lara de Oliveira, Andreia Borges Scriboni, Adélia Cristina Oliveira Cintra, Raphael Schezaro-Ramos, Márcio Galdino Dos Santos, Karina Cogo-Müller, Regina Yuri Hashimoto Miura, Rafael Stuani Floriano, Sandro Rostelato-Ferreira, Yoko Oshima-Franco
Purpose: Bothrops snakes are responsible for more than 70 % of snakebites every year in Brazil and their venoms cause severe local and systemic damages. The pharmacological properties of medicinal plants have been widely investigated in order to discover new alternative treatments for different classes of diseases including neglected tropical diseases as envenomation by snakebites. In this work, we have investigated the ability of Vochysia haenkeana stem barks extract (VhE) to neutralize the neuromuscular effects caused by Bothropstoxin-I (BthTX-I), the major phospholipase A2 (PLA2) myotoxin from B...
September 2017: Advanced Pharmaceutical Bulletin
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29068939/watch-out-for-wild-animals-a-systematic-review-of-upper-extremity-injuries-caused-by-uncommon-species
#8
REVIEW
Jacqueline S Israel, James E McCarthy, Katherine R Rose, Venkat K Rao
BACKGROUND: Across the world, many species of nondomesticated animals dwell among humans in metropolitan areas. Rare animal bites pose a dilemma for hand surgeons, as they often result in operative injuries and recalcitrant infections. The authors treated an 85-year-old man who experienced severe cellulitis of the index finger following an opossum bite. This case prompted a systematic review of upper extremity injuries caused by species other than dogs, cats, snakes, and insects. METHODS: The authors conducted a systematic review of PubMed and Scopus databases to identify relevant articles published between 1980 and 2016...
November 2017: Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29068247/australian-elapid-snake-envenomation-in-cats-clinical-priorities-and-approach
#9
Trudi J Mcalees, Linda A Abraham
Practical relevance: No fewer than 140 species of terrestrial snakes reside in Australia, 92 of which possess venom glands. With the exception of the brown tree snake, the venom-producing snakes belong to the family Elapidae. The venom of a number of elapid species is more toxic than that of the Indian cobra and eastern diamondback rattle snake, which has earned Australia its reputation for being home to the world's most venomous snakes. Clinical challenges: The diagnosis of elapid snake envenomation is not always easy...
November 2017: Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29024773/an-improved-technique-for-the-assessment-of-venom-induced-haemorrhage-in-a-murine-model
#10
Timothy P Jenkins, Andrés Sánchez, Álvaro Segura, Mariángela Vargas, María Herrera, Trenton K Stewart, Guillermo León, José María Gutiérrez
Haemorrhage is a common clinical manifestation in envenomings caused by bites from snakes of the family Viperidae. Therefore, knowing the haemorrhagic potential of venoms and the capacity of antivenoms to neutralise this effect are of paramount relevance in toxinology. The most widely used method for quantifying haemorrhage involves the intradermal injection of venom (or a mixture of venom/antivenom) in mice, and the assessment of the resulting haemorrhagic area in the inner side of the skin. Although this method allows a straightforward assessment of the haemorrhagic activity of a venom, it does not account for haemorrhagic lesions having a similar area but differing in the depth and intensity of haemorrhage...
December 1, 2017: Toxicon: Official Journal of the International Society on Toxinology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29024771/development-of-dot-elisa-for-the-detection-of-venoms-of-major-indian-venomous-snakes
#11
Innus K Shaikh, Prashant P Dixit, Balasaheb S Pawade, Indrasen G Waykar
India remained an epicenter for the snakebite-related mortality and morbidities due to widespread agricultural activities across the country and a considerable number of snakebites offended by Indian cobra (Naja naja), common krait (Bungarus caeruleus), Russell's viper (Daboia russelii), and saw-scaled viper (Echis carinatus). Presently, there is no selective test available for the detection of snake envenomation in India before the administration of snake antivenin. Therefore, the present study aimed to develop rapid, sensitive assay for the management of snakebite, which can detect venom, responsible snake species and serve as a tool for the reasonable administration of snake antivenin, which have scarcity across the world...
December 1, 2017: Toxicon: Official Journal of the International Society on Toxinology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29021149/the-envenomation-of-general-physiology-throughout-the-last-century
#12
Jon T Sack
Toxins are the poisonous products of organisms. Toxins serve vital defensive and offensive functions for those that harbor them: stinging scorpions, pesticidal plants, sanguinary snakes, fearless frogs, sliming snails, noxious newts, and smarting spiders. For physiologists, toxins are integral chemical tools that hijack life's fundamental processes with remarkable molecular specificity. Our understanding of electrophysiological phenomena has been transformed time and time again with the help of some terrifying toxins...
November 6, 2017: Journal of General Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28988729/allergic-reactions-to-antivenom-in-a-patient-bitten-twice-by-the-same-snake-within-a-month-a-rare-case-report-and-literature-review
#13
Fan-Jie Zeng, Cong Chen, Ming-Hua Liu
Antivenom is the most effective method currently available for the treatment of poisonous snake bite. Allergic reactions to antivenom have been reported in the past. Here we shared a case of allergic reactions to antivenom in an old male patient who was bitten twice by the same snake (probably same one) at the same biting site within a month whereas the patient did not show any allergic disorder in the first bitten. Envenomations twice in a short period time by the same kind of snake are very rare. Physician should be alert to the occurrence of allergic reactions in treating this type of patients with antivenom...
July 13, 2017: Chinese Journal of Traumatology, Zhonghua Chuang Shang za Zhi
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28975491/the-epidemiology-clinical-course-and-management-of-snakebites-in-the-north-american-snakebite-registry
#14
Anne-Michelle Ruha, Kurt C Kleinschmidt, Spencer Greene, Meghan B Spyres, Jeffrey Brent, Paul Wax, Angela Padilla-Jones, Sharan Campleman
The American College of Medical Toxicology established the North American Snakebite Registry (NASBR), a national database of detailed, prospectively collected information regarding snake envenomation in the United States, in 2013. This report describes the epidemiology, clinical course, and management of snakebites in the NASBR. All cases entered into the NASBR between January 1, 2013 and December 31, 2015 were identified. Descriptive statistics are used to report results. Fourteen sites in 10 states entered 450 snakebites...
October 3, 2017: Journal of Medical Toxicology: Official Journal of the American College of Medical Toxicology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28943445/the-effects-of-cissampelos-pareira-extract-on-envenomation-induced-by-bothropsdiporus-snake-venom
#15
Bárbara Ricciardi Verrastro, Ana Maria Torres, Gabriela Ricciardi, Pamela Teibler, Silvana Maruñak, Chiara Barnaba, Roberto Larcher, Giorgio Nicolini, Eduardo Dellacassa
ETHNOPHARMACOLOGICAL RELEVANCE: Ophidian accidents are a serious public health problem in Argentina; the Bothrops species is responsible for 97% of these accidents, and in particular, B. diporus is responsible for 80% of them. In the northeast of the country (Corrientes Provinces), Cissampelos pareira L. (Menispermaceae) is commonly used against the venom of B. diporus; its use is described in almost all ethnobotanical literature from countries where the plant grows. AIM OF THE STUDY: In this study, the in vitro and in vivo antivenom activities of C...
September 21, 2017: Journal of Ethnopharmacology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28920799/presumptive-pit-viper-envenomation-in-psittacines-in-a-brazilian-zoo
#16
Mathias Dislich, Peter Wohlsein, Anna Sophie Croukamp, Ulrich Neumann
Snake bites represent a serious public health risk in many regions of the globe, especially in tropical areas. Clinical signs and postmortem changes are well described in human and other mammalian species. However, detailed case reports about venomous snake attacks in avian species are limited. This report describes presumptive fatal envenomations in three psittacines caused by pit vipers in a Brazilian zoo. In one case, a Brazilian lancehead (Bothrops moojeni) was captured in the aviary. In all three cases the dermis around the suspected snake bite area exhibited hemorrhages and edema...
September 2017: Journal of Zoo and Wildlife Medicine: Official Publication of the American Association of Zoo Veterinarians
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28918605/food-or-threat-wild-capuchin-monkeys-sapajus-libidinosus-as-both-predators-and-prey-of-snakes
#17
Tiago Falótico, Michele P Verderane, Olívia Mendonça-Furtado, Noemi Spagnoletti, Eduardo B Ottoni, Elisabetta Visalberghi, Patrícia Izar
Snakes present a hazard to primates, both as active predators and by defensive envenomation. This risk might have been a selective pressure on the evolution of primate visual and cognitive systems, leading to several behavioral traits present in human and non-human primates, such as the ability to quickly learn to fear snakes. Primates seldom prey on snakes, and humans are one of the few primate species that do. We report here another case, the wild capuchin monkey (Sapajus libidinosus), which preys on snakes...
September 16, 2017: Primates; Journal of Primatology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28905944/snakebite-envenoming
#18
REVIEW
José María Gutiérrez, Juan J Calvete, Abdulrazaq G Habib, Robert A Harrison, David J Williams, David A Warrell
Snakebite envenoming is a neglected tropical disease that kills >100,000 people and maims >400,000 people every year. Impoverished populations living in the rural tropics are particularly vulnerable; snakebite envenoming perpetuates the cycle of poverty. Snake venoms are complex mixtures of proteins that exert a wide range of toxic actions. The high variability in snake venom composition is responsible for the various clinical manifestations in envenomings, ranging from local tissue damage to potentially life-threatening systemic effects...
September 14, 2017: Nature Reviews. Disease Primers
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28904556/medicinal-plants-for-the-treatment-of-local-tissue-damage-induced-by-snake-venoms-an-overview-from-traditional-use-to-pharmacological-evidence
#19
REVIEW
Juliana Félix-Silva, Arnóbio Antônio Silva-Junior, Silvana Maria Zucolotto, Matheus de Freitas Fernandes-Pedrosa
Snakebites are a serious problem in public health due to their high morbimortality. Most of snake venoms produce intense local tissue damage, which could lead to temporary or permanent disability in victims. The available specific treatment is the antivenom serum therapy, whose effectiveness is reduced against these effects. Thus, the search for complementary alternatives for snakebite treatment is relevant. There are several reports of the popular use of medicinal plants against snakebites worldwide. In recent years, many studies have been published giving pharmacological evidence of benefits of several vegetal species against local effects induced by a broad range of snake venoms, including inhibitory potential against hyaluronidase, phospholipase, proteolytic, hemorrhagic, myotoxic, and edematogenic activities...
2017: Evidence-based Complementary and Alternative Medicine: ECAM
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28889321/effects-of-purified-human-fibrinogen-modified-with-carbon-monoxide-and-iron-on-coagulation-in-rabbits-injected-with-crotalus-atrox-venom
#20
Vance G Nielsen
While snake venom derived enzymes, such as the thrombin-like activity possessing ancrod, have been used to treat thrombotic disease by defibrinogenating patients, the therapeutic potential of fibrinogenolytic snake venom enzymes, such as those derived from Crotalus atrox, have not been fully explored. However, one of the potential risks of administering fibrinogenolytic enzymes to effect defibrinogenation is hemorrhage secondary to hypofibrinogenemia. The present investigation sought to determine if human fibrinogen modified with carbon monoxide (CO) and iron (Fe) could resist degradation by C...
November 2017: Journal of Thrombosis and Thrombolysis
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