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Point of care ultrasound (PoCUS)

William Bortcosh, Ashkon Shaahinfar, Sakina Sojar, Jean E Klig
PURPOSE OF REVIEW: The diagnostic capability, efficiency and versatility of point-of-care ultrasound (POCUS) have enabled its use in paediatric emergency medicine (PEM) and paediatric critical care (PICU). This review highlights the current applications of POCUS for the critically ill child across PEM and PICU to identify areas of progress and standardized practice and to elucidate areas for future research. RECENT FINDINGS: POCUS technology continues to evolve and advance bedside clinical care for critically ill children, with ongoing research extending its use for an array of clinical scenarios, including respiratory distress, trauma and dehydration...
March 9, 2018: Current Opinion in Pediatrics
Benjamin Marchandot, François Levy, Nicola Santelmo, Paul-Michel Mertes, Olivier Morel
BACKGROUND: Adequate strategies using either transthoracic (TTE) or transesophageal (TEE) echocardiography in patients receiving cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is an ongoing area of research. OBJECTIVES: As transthoracic point-of-care ultrasound (POCUS) during cardiac arrest resuscitation might result in an increased duration of interruptions in the delivery of chest compressions; the use of TEE has been proposed as an alternative. METHODS: No technical complications of either TTE nor TEE are so far being reported in the literature...
March 2, 2018: Heart & Lung: the Journal of Critical Care
Niccolò Parri, Bradley J Crosby, Lisa Mills, Zachary Soucy, Anna Maria Musolino, Liviana Da Dalt, Angela Cirilli, Laura Grisotto, Nathan Kuppermann
OBJECTIVES: To determine the accuracy of skull point-of-care ultrasound (POCUS) for identifying fractures in children younger than 2 years of age with signs of head trauma, and the ability of POCUS to identify the type and depth of fracture depression. STUDY DESIGN: This was a multicenter, prospective, observational study of children younger than 2 years of age with nontrivial mechanisms of injury and signs of scalp/skull trauma. Patients were enrolled if they underwent computed tomography (CT)...
February 28, 2018: Journal of Pediatrics
Kelcy Higa, Stephen Irving, Richard J Cervantes, Jayce Pangilinan, Laura R Slykhouse, Dale P Woolridge, Richard Amini
This report highlights a presentation of urinary calculus impacted at the urethral meatus and bedside extraction after evaluation with point-of-care ultrasound (POCUS). Visualization of a stone at the urethral meatus prompted a point-of-care ultrasound of the penile shaft and glans. The ultrasound ruled out anatomic variations such as urethral diverticula and as a result bedside removal was expedited. The stone was successfully removed with traction and intraurethral lidocaine gel without urethral lesions or injury to the meatus...
December 20, 2017: Curēus
Robert P Jamplis, Lucas Friedman, Srikar Adhikari
A 28-year-old male was brought to the emergency department by the Emergency medical services (EMS) after being found unconscious and unresponsive. Upon arrival, he was hypotensive, intubated with a Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) 3T, without the signs of trauma or the evidence of bleeding. A focused assessment with sonography in trauma (FAST), point-of-care ultrasound (POCUS) was performed, obscuring part of the spleen from the distended stomach, which was filled with the heterogeneous contents, with the internal movement being identified...
December 17, 2017: Curēus
Charles Wong, Braden Teitge, Marshall Ross, Paul Young, Helen Lee Robertson, Eddy Lang
INTRODUCTION: Point-of-care ultrasound (POCUS) has been suggested as an initial investigation in the management of renal colic. Our objectives were: 1) to determine the accuracy of POCUS for the diagnosis of nephrolithiasis, and 2) to assess its prognostic value in the management of renal colic. METHODS: The review protocol was registered to the PROSPERO database (CRD42016035331). An electronic database search of MEDLINE, EMBASE, and PubMed was conducted utilizing subject headings, keywords, and synonyms that address our research question...
February 10, 2018: Academic Emergency Medicine: Official Journal of the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine
Victor Istasy, Drew Thompson, Mirielle Gharib, Rodrick Lim
The focus of this review is to examine the current state of paediatric Point of Care Ultrasound (POCUS) in the injured patient. POCUS has become useful across various medical specialties owing to its ease of use, reproducibility and non-ionizing qualities. Point of care ultrasound has advanced over the past years and has proven to be an extremely useful adjunct in the injured child. Discussion will center around the challenges on when and how to best utilize POCUS. This includes but is not limited to: detection of peritoneal free fluid, pneumothoraces, hemothoraces, pericardial effusions, a wide array of fractures, lung contusions and many other applications...
February 1, 2018: Current Pediatric Reviews
Paul Bornemann, Neil Jayasekera, Kevin Bergman, Mena Ramos, Jaqueline Gerhart
Point-of-care ultrasound (POCUS) has been gaining greater traction in recent years as a way to quickly (and cost-effectively) assess for conditions including systolic dysfunction, pleural effusion, abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA), and deep vein thrombosis (DVT). It involves limited and specific ultrasound protocols performed at the bedside by the health care provider who is trying to answer a specific question and, thus, help guide treatment of the patient. In this article, we will review the evidence for the use of POCUS in 4 areas: the cardiovascular exam, the lung exam, the screening exam for AAAs, and the evaluation for DVT...
February 2018: Journal of Family Practice
Philippe Le Conte, David Trewick, Philippe Pes, Eric Frampas, Eric Batard
BACKGROUND: Epigastric pain is frequent in Emergency Medicine and remains a challenging situation. Besides benign etiologies such as gastritis or uncomplicated cholelithiasis, it could reveal myocardial infarction or vascular disease. Point-of-care ultrasound (POCUS) could be performed in such situation. CASE PRESENTATION: A healthy 66-year-old man with no previous medical history was admitted to the Emergency Department for a rapid onset epigastric pain. He reported taking non-steroidal anti-inflammatories for 1 week prior to admission...
February 1, 2018: Critical Ultrasound Journal
Kong Eric You-Ten, Naveed Siddiqui, Wendy H Teoh, Michael S Kristensen
Airway management is a critical skill in the practice of several medical specialities including anesthesia, emergency medicine, and critical care. Over the years mounting evidence has showed an increasing role of ultrasound (US) in airway management. The objective of this narrative review is to provide an overview of the indications for point-of-care ultrasound (POCUS) of the upper airway. The use of US to guide and assist clinical airway management has potential benefits for both provider and patient. Ultrasound can be utilized to determine airway size and predict the appropriate diameter of single-lumen endotracheal tubes (ETTs), double-lumen ETTs, and tracheostomy tubes...
January 18, 2018: Canadian Journal of Anaesthesia, Journal Canadien D'anesthésie
Massimiliano Meineri, Gregory L Bryson, Ramiro Arellano, Nikolaos Skubas
Point-of-care ultrasound (POCUS) is becoming an integral part of anesthesia practice throughout the world. Despite the growing interest in POCUS among trainees and faculty, POCUS training is variable among universities across Canada. This suggests a need for curriculum development and standardization. International guidelines for Emergency Medicine and Critical Care have common frameworks and may be used as a reference to model anesthesia-specific curricula. The Royal College of Anaesthetists of the United Kingdom currently offers the only nationally approved POCUS curriculum for anesthesia and critical care trainees...
January 16, 2018: Canadian Journal of Anaesthesia, Journal Canadien D'anesthésie
T Jared McCormick, Elizabeth Clarke Miller, Robert Chen, Viren N Naik
PURPOSE: Point-of-care ultrasound (POCUS) involves the bedside use of ultrasound to answer specific diagnostic questions and to assess real-time physiologic responses to treatment. Although POCUS has become a well-established resource for emergency and critical care physicians, anesthesiologists are still working to obtain POCUS skills and to incorporate them into routine practice. This review defines the benefits of POCUS to anesthesia practice, identifies challenges to establishing POCUS in routine anesthesia care, and offers solutions to help guide its incorporation going forward...
January 11, 2018: Canadian Journal of Anaesthesia, Journal Canadien D'anesthésie
Shao-Feng Liao, Pai-Jung Chen, Chung-Hsien Chaou, Ching-Hsing Lee
STUDY OBJECTIVES: Point-of-care ultrasound (POCUS) has been a rapidly growing and broadly used modality in recent decades. The purpose of this study was to determine how POCUS is incorporated into clinical medicine by analyzing trends of use in the published literature. METHODS: POCUS-related publications were retrieved from the Web of Science (WoS) database. The search results were ranked according to the number of times an article was cited during three time frames and average annual number of citations...
January 6, 2018: American Journal of Emergency Medicine
Danny Epstein, Neta Petersiel, Erez Klein, Erez Marcusohn, Eyal Aviran, Reut Harel, Zaher S Azzam, Ami Neuberger, Lior Fuchs
BACKGROUND: In the developing world, only a small minority of patients have access to radiological services. Over the past decade, technological developments of ultrasound equipment have led to the emergence of point-of-care ultrasonography (POCUS), which is widely used by healthcare professionals of nearly all specialties. We hypothesized that physicians with only basic POCUS training, but with telemedicine support, can use POCUS successfully in rural hospitals in sub-Saharan Africa...
January 6, 2018: Travel Medicine and Infectious Disease
Surekha Mullangi, Stephen M Sozio, Paul Segal, Steven Menez, Carol Martire, Tariq Shafi
Point-of-care ultrasound (POCUS) is rapidly emerging as a bedside diagnostic tool that can enhance physical diagnosis and facilitate clinical decision making. Although ultrasound is widely used by nephrologists for vascular access and kidney imaging, diagnostic POCUS skills in other anatomic areas are not part of routine nephrology training. In this narrative review, we will provide an overview of selected POCUS techniques, highlight potential uses of POCUS in routine nephrology practice, and describe a new curriculum implemented at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine to teach diagnostic POCUS skills to nephrology fellows...
January 3, 2018: Seminars in Dialysis
Mariko Nomura, Daniel Mantuani, Arun Nagdev
Vision loss in young adults is relatively rare. In patients with suspected HIV or syphilis, the risk of developing vision loss is increased, and should alert the emergency physician of specific retinal pathologies. We present a case of a 33-year-old man with recently identified syphilis and HIV, who was diagnosed with bilateral retinal detachments (RDs) with the help of point-of-care ultrasound (POCUS) in the setting of panuveitis (preventing visualization with direct fundoscopy).
December 6, 2017: American Journal of Emergency Medicine
Jorge Pedraza García, Joaquín Valle Alonso, Pedro Ceballos García, Francisca Rico Rodríguez, Miguel Ángel Aguayo López, María Del Carmen Muñoz-Villanueva
BACKGROUND: Compression ultrasonography is the most effective diagnostic tool in the emergency department (ED) for the diagnosis of deep vein thrombosis (DVT). It has been demonstrated to be highly accurate and cost-effective. OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to determine the accuracy of emergency physicians who performed three-point compression ultrasound (US) for suspected above-knee DVT within the context of using Wells score and D-dimer. METHOD: This was a prospective diagnostic test assessment of three-point ultrasound conducted in a district general hospital of patients who presented to the ED with suspected DVT of the lower limb...
January 3, 2018: Journal of Emergency Medicine
Hong Joon Ahn, Jun Wan Lee, Ki Hyuk Joo, Yeon Ho You, Seung Ryu, Jin Woong Lee, Seung Whan Kim
BACKGROUND: Cannulation of the great vessels is required for extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO). Currently, there is no guideline for optimal imaging modalities during percutaneous cannulation of ECMO. OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to describe percutaneous cannulation guided by point-of-care ultrasound (POCUS) for ECMO and compare it with fluoroscopy and landmark guidance. METHODS: Three groups (POCUS-, fluoroscopy-, and landmark-guided) of percutaneous cannulation for ECMO were analyzed retrospectively in a tertiary academic hospital...
December 30, 2017: Journal of Emergency Medicine
Sabine Bélard, Charlotte C Heuvelings, Ebrahim Banderker, Lindy Bateman, Tom Heller, Savvas Andronikou, Lesley Workman, Martin P Grobusch, Heather J Zar
BACKGROUND: Point-of-care ultrasound (POCUS) detects extra-pulmonary tuberculosis (EPTB) in HIV-infected adults but has not been evaluated in children despite their higher risk of EPTB. This study's aims were to investigate feasibility of POCUS for EPTB in children, frequency of POCUS findings suggestive of EPTB, and time to sonographic resolution of findings with treatment. METHODS: This prospective South African cohort study enrolled children with suspected PTB...
December 22, 2017: Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal
Rona Zuker-Herman, Irit Ayalon Dangur, Ron Berant, Elinor Cohen Sitt, Libbi Baskin, Yossi Shaya, Shachaf Shiber
Lower extremity deep vein thrombosis (DVT) is a frequent cause of admission to the emergency departments (ED). Although the gold standard for diagnosis is the Duplex ultrasound examination, the current study used for diagnosis of DVT in the ED by emergency physicians is the point-of-care compression ultrasound (POCUS). To compare the sensitivity and specificity of the two-point and three-point compression ultrasound (2PCUS and 3PCUS respectively) for diagnosis of lower extremity DVT in an ED management. We prospectively recruited outpatients who were admitted to the ED with suspected lower extremity DVT...
December 14, 2017: Journal of Thrombosis and Thrombolysis
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