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Mitochondrial movement

Alexandre Hassanin, Nicolas Nesi, Julie Marin, Blaise Kadjo, Xavier Pourrut, Éric Leroy, Guy-Crispin Gembu, Prescott Musaba Akawa, Carine Ngoagouni, Emmanuel Nakouné, Manuel Ruedi, Didier Tshikung, Célestin Pongombo Shongo, Céline Bonillo
Both Ebolavirus and Marburgvirus were detected in several fruit bat species of the family Pteropodidae, suggesting that this taxon plays a key role in the life cycle of filoviruses. After four decades of Zaire Ebolavirus (ZEBOV) outbreaks in Central Africa, the virus was detected for the first time in West Africa in 2014. To better understand the role of fruit bats as potential reservoirs and circulating hosts between Central and West Africa, we examine here the phylogeny and comparative phylogeography of Pteropodidae...
October 13, 2016: Comptes Rendus Biologies
Jennifer Chi Lo, Anne E O'Connor, Zane B Andrews, Camden Lo, Tony Tiganis, Matthew J Watt, Moira K O'Bryan
Fatty liver, or hepatic steatosis, is an alarmingly common pathology in western societies, in large part because if left unheaded it can lead to life-threatening forms of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, including non-alcoholic steatohepatitis, fibrosis, cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. As such, it is essential that we attain a greater understanding of the pathways that control energy partitioning in the liver, and ultimately how they are impacted by environmental factors. Herein, we define the essential requirement for a member of the RAB-like clade of small GTPases, RABL2, in fatty acid metabolism including in microtubule-associated mitochondrial movement within the liver...
October 12, 2016: Endocrinology
Sophie Le Page, Marjorie Niro, Jérémy Fauconnier, Laura Cellier, Sophie Tamareille, Abdallah Gharib, Arnaud Chevrollier, Laurent Loufrani, Céline Grenier, Rima Kamel, Emmanuelle Sarzi, Alain Lacampagne, Michel Ovize, Daniel Henrion, Pascal Reynier, Guy Lenaers, Delphine Mirebeau-Prunier, Fabrice Prunier
BACKGROUND: Recent data suggests the involvement of mitochondrial dynamics in cardiac ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injuries. Whilst excessive mitochondrial fission has been described as detrimental, the role of fusion proteins in this context remains uncertain. OBJECTIVES: To investigate whether Opa1 (protein involved in mitochondrial inner-membrane fusion) deficiency affects I/R injuries. METHODS AND RESULTS: We examined mice exhibiting Opa1delTTAG mutations (Opa1+/-), showing 70% Opa1 protein expression in the myocardium as compared to their wild-type (WT) littermates...
2016: PloS One
Y-X Kang, Y-J Wang, Q Zhang, X-H Pang, W Gu
Kearns-Sayre syndrome (KSS) is a disorder caused by mutations in mitochondrial DNA. Here, we report an unusual case of Kearns-Sayre syndrome accompanied by hypopituitarism (deficiencies in reproductive and growth hormones). A 20-year-old male presented with growth retardation for the last 8 years, as well as the following findings: short stature, delayed puberty, myasthenia, an extraocular movement deficit, drooping eyelids, pectus carinatum and scoliosis. Cerebral enhanced magnetic resonance imaging revealed dysplasias of the pituitary, white matter and cerebellum...
October 6, 2016: Andrologia
Joachim Nielsen, Kasper D Gejl, Martin Hey-Mogensen, Hans-Christer Holmberg, Charlotte Suetta, Peter Krustrup, Coen P H Elemans, Niels Ørtenblad
Mitochondrial energy production involves the movement of protons down a large electrochemical gradient through ATP synthase located on the folded inner membrane, known as cristae. In mammalian skeletal muscle, the density of cristae in mitochondria is thought to be constant. However, recent experimental studies have shown that respiration per mitochondria varies.Modelling studies have hypothesised that this variation in respiration per mitochondria depends on plasticity in cristae density, but currently evidence for such a mechanism is lacking...
October 3, 2016: Journal of Physiology
Chiun-Chieh Yu, Meng-Hsiang Chen, Cheng-Hsien Lu, Yung-Cheng Huang, Hsiu-Ling Chen, Nai-Wen Tsai, Hung-Chen Wang, I-Hsiao Yang, Shau-Hsuan Li, Wei-Che Lin
Parkinson's disease (PD) is the most second common neurodegenerative movement disorder. Neuroinflammation due to systemic inflammation and elevated oxidative stress is considered a major factor promoting the pathogenesis of PD, but the relationship of structural brain imaging parameters to clinical inflammatory markers has not been well studied. Our aim was to evaluate the association of magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) measures with inflammatory markers. Blood samples were collected from 33 patients with newly diagnosed PD and 30 healthy volunteers...
2016: Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity
Carolina Courage, Christopher B Jackson, Dagmar Hahn, Liliya Euro, Jean-Marc Nuoffer, Sabina Gallati, André Schaller
Isolated defects of the mitochondrial respiratory complex II (succinate dehydrogenase, SDH) are rare, accounting for approximately 2% of all respiratory chain deficiency diagnoses. Here, we report clinical and molecular investigations of three family members with a heterozygous mutation in the large flavoprotein subunit SDHA previously described to cause complex II deficiency. The index patient presented with bilateral optic atrophy and ocular movement disorder, a progressive polyneuropathy, psychiatric involvement, and cardiomyopathy...
September 28, 2016: American Journal of Medical Genetics. Part A
P Githure M'Angale, Brian E Staveley
BACKGROUND: Parkinson disease (PD) is a debilitating movement disorder that afflicts 1-2% of the population over 50 years of age. The common hallmark for both sporadic and familial forms of PD is mitochondrial dysfunction. Mammals have at least twenty proapoptotic and antiapoptotic Bcl-2 family members, in contrast, only two Bcl-2 family genes have been identified in Drosophila melanogaster, the proapoptotic mitochondrial localized Debcl and the antiapoptotic Buffy. The expression of the human transgene α-synuclein, a gene that is strongly associated with inherited forms of PD, in dopaminergic neurons (DA) of Drosophila, results in loss of neurons and locomotor dysfunction to model PD in flies...
2016: PeerJ
Mitzy Pepper, David G Hamilton, Thomas Merkling, Nina Svedin, Bori Cser, Renee A Catullo, Sarah R Pryke, J Scott Keogh
The spectacular threat display of the savannah specialist Australo-Papuan frilled lizards has made them one of the world's most iconic reptiles. They are increasingly used as a model system for research in evolutionary biology and ecology but little is known of their population structure. Their distribution across northern Australia and southern New Guinea also provides an opportunity to examine biogeographic patterns as they relate to the large-scale movement of savannah habitat during the Plio/Pleistocene and the associated increase in aridity...
September 21, 2016: Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution
R J Aitken, L Muscio, S Whiting, H S Connaughton, B A Fraser, B Nixon, N D Smith, G N De Iuliis
The need to protect human spermatozoa from oxidative stress during assisted reproductive technology, has prompted a detailed analysis of the impacts of phenolic compounds on the functional integrity of these cells. Investigation of 16 individual compounds revealed a surprising variety of negative effects including: (i) a loss of mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψm) via mechanisms that were not related to opening of the permeability transition pore but associated with a reduction in thiol expression, (ii) a decline in intracellular reduced glutathione, (iii) the stimulation of pro-oxidant activity including the induction of ROS generation from mitochondrial and non-mitochondrial sources, (iv) stimulation of lipid peroxidation, (v) the generation of oxidative DNA damage, and (vi) impaired sperm motility...
September 19, 2016: Biochemical Pharmacology
Caterina Garone, Juliana Gurgel-Giannetti, Simone Sanna-Cherchi, Sindu Krishna, Ali Naini, Catarina M Quinzii, Michio Hirano
SUCLA2 defects have been associated with mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) depletion and the triad of hypotonia, dystonia/Leigh-like syndrome, and deafness. A 9-year-old Brazilian boy of consanguineous parents presented with psychomotor delay, deafness, myopathy, ataxia, and chorea. Despite the prominent movement disorder, brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was normal while (1)H-magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) showed lactate peaks in the cerebral cortex and lateral ventricles. Decreased biochemical activities of mitochondrial respiratory chain enzymes containing mtDNA-encoded subunits and mtDNA depletion were observed in muscle and fibroblasts...
September 20, 2016: Journal of Child Neurology
Xuzhen Wang, Xiaoni Gan, Junbing Li, Yiyu Chen, Shunping He
Origin and diversification of the Tibetan polyploid cyprinids (schizothoracins) may help us to explore relationships between diversification of the cyprinids and the Tibetan Plateau uplift. Cyprininae phylogeny was analyzed using mitochondrial and nuclear DNA sequences to trace origins of polyploidy and diversifications of schizothoracins. Ancestral states reconstruction for ploidy levels indicated that the Cyprininae was diploid origin and the schizothoracin clades tetraploid origins. There were two diversification rate shifts along with diversification of the cyprinine fishes in response to the Tibetan uplift...
September 20, 2016: Science China. Life Sciences
Kylie M Cairns, Alan N Wilton
How and when dingoes arrived in Oceania poses a fascinating question for scientists with interest in the historical movements of humans and dogs. The dingo holds a unique position as top terrestrial predator of Australia and exists in a wild state. In the first geographical survey of genetic diversity in the dingo using whole mitochondrial genomes, we analysed 16,428 bp in 25 individuals from five separate populations. We also investigated 13 nuclear loci to compare with the mitochondrial population history patterns...
October 2016: Genetica
Géraldine Liot, Julien Valette, Jérémy Pépin, Julien Flament, Emmanuel Brouillet
Huntington's disease (HD) is an inherited progressive neurodegenerative disorder associated with involuntary abnormal movements (chorea), cognitive deficits and psychiatric disturbances. The most striking neuropathological change in HD is the early atrophy of the striatum. While the disease progresses, other brain structures also degenerate, including the cerebral cortex. Changes are also seen outside the brain, in particular weight loss/cachexia despite high dietary intake. The disease is caused by an abnormal expansion of a CAG repeat in the gene encoding the huntingtin protein (Htt)...
September 14, 2016: Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications
Chung-Han Hsieh, Atossa Shaltouki, Ashley E Gonzalez, Alexandre Bettencourt da Cruz, Lena F Burbulla, Erica St Lawrence, Birgitt Schüle, Dimitri Krainc, Theo D Palmer, Xinnan Wang
Mitochondrial movements are tightly controlled to maintain energy homeostasis and prevent oxidative stress. Miro is an outer mitochondrial membrane protein that anchors mitochondria to microtubule motors and is removed to stop mitochondrial motility as an early step in the clearance of dysfunctional mitochondria. Here, using human induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC)-derived neurons and other complementary models, we build on a previous connection of Parkinson's disease (PD)-linked PINK1 and Parkin to Miro by showing that a third PD-related protein, LRRK2, promotes Miro removal by forming a complex with Miro...
August 25, 2016: Cell Stem Cell
Jae Ryul Bae, Sung Hyun Kim
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
September 7, 2016: Archives of Pharmacal Research
Umberto Rodella, Michele Scorzeto, Elisa Duregotti, Samuele Negro, Bryan C Dickinson, Christopher J Chang, Nobuhiro Yuki, Michela Rigoni, Cesare Montecucco
The neuromuscular junction is a tripartite synapse composed of the presynaptic nerve terminal, the muscle and perisynaptic Schwann cells. Its functionality is essential for the execution of body movements and is compromised in a number of disorders, including Miller Fisher syndrome, a variant of Guillain-Barré syndrome: this autoimmune peripheral neuropathy is triggered by autoantibodies specific for the polysialogangliosides GQ1b and GT1a present in motor axon terminals, including those innervating ocular muscles, and in sensory neurons...
September 3, 2016: Neurobiology of Disease
Hayate Javed, Sheikh Azimullah, Salema B Abul Khair, Shreesh Ojha, M Emdadul Haque
BACKGROUND: Parkinson disease (PD) is a movement disorder affecting 1 % of people over the age of 60. The etiology of the disease is unknown; however, accumulating evidence suggests that mitochondrial defects, oxidative stress, and neuroinflammation play important roles in developing the disease. Current medications for PD can only improve its symptoms, but are unable to halt its progressive nature. Although many therapeutic approaches are available, new drugs are urgently needed for the treatment of PD...
2016: BMC Neuroscience
Lauren E Vandepas, Frederick D Dooley, Gregory J Barord, Billie J Swalla, Peter D Ward
The cephalopod genus Nautilus is considered a "living fossil" with a contested number of extant and extinct species, and a benthic lifestyle that limits movement of animals between isolated seamounts and landmasses in the Indo-Pacific. Nautiluses are fished for their shells, most heavily in the Philippines, and these fisheries have little monitoring or regulation. Here, we evaluate the hypothesis that multiple species of Nautilus (e.g., N. belauensis, N. repertus and N. stenomphalus) are in fact one species with a diverse phenotypic and geologic range...
July 2016: Ecology and Evolution
Anindita Bose, M Flint Beal
Parkinson's disease (PD) is the second most common neurodegenerative disease. About 2% of the population above the age of 60 is affected by the disease. The pathological hallmarks of the disease include the loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra and the presence of Lewy bodies that are made of α-synuclein. Several theories have been suggested for the pathogenesis of PD, of which mitochondrial dysfunction plays a pivotal role in both sporadic and familial forms of the disease. Dysfunction of the mitochondria that is caused by bioenergetic defects, mutations in mitochondrial DNA, nuclear DNA gene mutations linked to mitochondria, and changes in dynamics of the mitochondria such fusion or fission, changes in size and morphology, alterations in trafficking or transport, altered movement of mitochondria, impairment of transcription, and the presence of mutated proteins associated with mitochondria are implicated in PD...
October 2016: Journal of Neurochemistry
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