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Pediatric pain

Neil C Ford, Mark L Baccei
Spinal lamina I projection neurons serve as a major conduit by which noxious stimuli detected in the periphery are transmitted to nociceptive circuits in the brain, including the parabrachial nucleus (PB) and the periaqueductal gray (PAG). While neonatal spino-PB neurons are more than twice as likely to exhibit spontaneous activity compared to spino-PAG neurons, the underlying mechanisms remain unclear since nothing is known about the voltage-independent (i.e. 'leak') ion channels expressed by these distinct populations during early life...
October 14, 2016: Neuroscience
Merritt D Kinon, Rani Nasser, Jonathan Nakhla, Rupen Desai, Jessica R Moreno, Reza Yassari, Carlos A Bagley
Pediatric emergency physicians must have a high clinical suspicion for atlantoaxial rotatory subluxation (AARS), particularly when a child presents with neck pain and an abnormal head posture without the ability to return to a neutral position. As shown in the neurosurgical literature, timely diagnosis and swift initiation of treatment have a greater chance of treatment success for the patient. However, timely treatment is complicated because torticollis can result from a variety of maladies, including: congenital abnormalities involving the C1-C2 joint or the surrounding supporting muscles and ligaments, central nervous system abnormalities, obstetric palsies from brachial plexus injuries, clavicle fractures, head and neck surgery, and infection...
October 2016: Pediatric Emergency Care
Lynn Babcock, Cody S Olsen, David M Jaffe, Julie C Leonard
OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to ascertain potential factors associated with cervical spine injuries in children injured during sports and recreational activities. METHODS: This is a secondary analysis of a multicenter retrospective case-control study involving children younger than 16 years who presented to emergency departments after blunt trauma and underwent cervical spine radiography. Cases had cervical spine injury from sports or recreational activities (n = 179)...
September 30, 2016: Pediatric Emergency Care
James W Varni, Robert J Shulman, Mariella M Self, Shehzad A Saeed, Ashish S Patel, Samuel Nurko, Deborah A Neigut, Miguel Saps, James P Franciosi, Jolanda M Denham, George M Zacur, Chelsea Vaughan Dark, Cristiane B Bendo, John F Pohl
OBJECTIVES: To investigate the multidimensional gastrointestinal symptoms predictors of generic health-related quality of life (HRQOL) in pediatric patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) from the perspectives of pediatric patients and parents. METHODS: The Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory (PedsQL) Gastrointestinal Symptoms Scales and PedsQL 4.0 Generic Core Scales were completed in a 9-site study by 260 families of patients with IBD. Gastrointestinal Symptoms Scales measuring stomach pain, food and drink limits, gas and bloating, constipation, blood in stool, and diarrhea were identified as clinically important symptom differentiators from healthy controls based on prior findings, and subsequently tested for bivariate and multivariate linear associations with overall HRQOL (Generic Core Scales)...
October 5, 2016: Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition
Aris Oates, Kelly A Benedict, Karen Sun, Paul R Brakeman, Jessica Lim, Cynthia Kim
Evaluate laser acupuncture as an adjuvant therapy in pain management during percutaneous kidney biopsy procedure in children and adolescents. This prospective, double-blinded, randomized controlled trial enrolled patients aged 7-26 years admitted to a children's hospital for percutaneous kidney biopsy. Patients received laser acupuncture to treatment points (acupuncture group) or sham points (control group) prior to the procedure. Laser delivered a dose of 42 J/cm over 10 acupoints. Patients and parents rated the pain during and after the biopsy, and change in pain scores were calculated for each patient...
September 29, 2016: Pain
Laila Alawdah, Ahmad Nahari, Dayel Alshahrani, Musa Fagih, Shahid Ghazi, Abdulrahman Al-Hussaini
Gastrointestinal sarcoidosis is a rare disease with very limited data in children. Here we report the first pediatric case of successful treatment with infliximab. The first case was an 8-year-old Saudi girl who presented with fever, weight loss, and abdominal pain that was followed in a few months with hematemesis and development of hepatosplenomegaly. The second case was a 9-year-old Sudanese boy who manifested with vomiting, epigastric pain, and weight loss. On upper endoscopy, both cases demonstrated severe erosive nodular gastric mucosa...
September 2016: Saudi Journal of Gastroenterology: Official Journal of the Saudi Gastroenterology Association
F J Bohanon, O Nunez Lopez, B M Graham, L W Griffin, R S Radhakrishnan
Superior mesenteric artery syndrome (SMAS) is a rare, debilitating clinical condition caused by compression of the third portion of the duodenum by the superior mesenteric artery. Common symptoms include intermittent postprandial abdominal pain, nausea, weight loss, and bilious vomiting. Here we present a case series of three patients with SMAS who were treated with laparoscopic duodenojejunostomy. Patients were females between 12-17 years old. All patients underwent a successful laparoscopic duodenojejunostomy after diagnosis...
2016: Int J Surg Res
Donald Nuss, Robert J Obermeyer, Robert E Kelly
Historically, pectus excavatum (PE) was reported to be congenital, but in our experience only 22% are noticed in the first decade of life. Thus far, genetic studies support an autosomal recessive heritability, which coincides with only 40% of our patients having some positive family history, but is also contradictory given a constant sex ratio of 4:1 in favor of males. This inconsistency may be explained by the effect of more than one pectus disease-associated allele. Once the deformity is noticed, it tends to progress slowly until puberty, when rapid progression is often seen...
September 2016: Annals of Cardiothoracic Surgery
Depinder Kaur, Saurabh Anand
BACKGROUND: Efficacy of caudal bupivacaine plus ketamine on postoperative pain in children. AIMS: The aim of this study was to compare the analgesic efficacy and safety of caudal block with mixture of bupivacaine and ketamine to bupivacaine alone for postoperative analgesia in pediatric patients undergoing infraumbilical surgery. SETTINGS AND DESIGN: A prospective randomized study was conducted in a tertiary care teaching hospital. STATISTICAL ANALYSIS: Data were collected; mean value and standard deviation were computed for age, weight, duration of surgery, and duration of analgesia...
September 2016: Anesthesia, Essays and Researches
Nariman A Nawar, Phyllis R Sawyer
BACKGROUND Segmental absence of intestinal musculature is a well described entity in premature infants. It presents with peritonitis, bowel perforation, and obstruction. The diagnosis is based on pathologic observation of absence of intestinal musculature. Researchers hypothesized that this entity is a result of a vascular accident during embryogenesis. However, segmental absence of intestinal musculature is no longer limited to the pediatric population. Recently, a few cases have been described in adults with and without significant vascular diseases...
October 17, 2016: American Journal of Case Reports
Emily F Law, Jessica L Fales, Sarah E Beals-Erickson, Alessandro Failo, Deirdre Logan, Edin Randall, Karen Weiss, Lindsay Durkin, Tonya M Palermo
OBJECTIVE : To adapt problem-solving skills training (PSST) for parents of children receiving intensive pain rehabilitation and evaluate treatment feasibility, acceptability, and satisfaction. METHODS : Using a prospective single-arm case series design, we evaluated the feasibility of delivering PSST to 26 parents (84.6% female) from one of three pediatric pain rehabilitation programs. Parents completed four to six sessions of PSST delivered during a 2-4-week period. A mixed-methods approach was used to assess treatment acceptability and satisfaction...
October 15, 2016: Journal of Pediatric Psychology
James W Varni, Robert J Shulman, Mariella M Self, Samuel Nurko, Miguel Saps, Shehzad A Saeed, Ashish S Patel, Chelsea Vaughan Dark, Cristiane B Bendo, John F Pohl
OBJECTIVES: To investigate the patient-reported multidimensional gastrointestinal symptoms predictors of generic health-related quality of life (HRQOL) in pediatric patients with functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGIDs). METHODS: The Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory™ (PedsQL™) Gastrointestinal Symptoms Scales and PedsQL™ 4.0 Generic Core Scales were completed in a 9-site study by 259 pediatric patients with functional constipation, functional abdominal pain (FAP), or irritable bowel syndrome (IBS)...
October 14, 2016: Quality of Life Research
Rebecca M Rentea, Shawn D St Peter, Charles L Snyder
Appendicitis is a common cause of abdominal pain in children. The diagnosis and treatment of the disease have undergone major changes in the past two decades, primarily as a result of the application of an evidence-based approach. Data from several randomized controlled trials, large database studies, and meta-analyses have fundamentally affected patient care. The best diagnostic approach is a standardized clinical pathway with a scoring system and selective imaging. Non-operative management of simple appendicitis is a reasonable option in selected cases, with the caveat that data in children remain limited...
October 14, 2016: Pediatric Surgery International
Bo Hyun Hwang, Younglim Kim, Gi-Bong Chae, Suk-Bae Moon
OBJECTIVE: The use of abdominal computed tomography (ACT) for nontraumatic abdominal pain in the pediatric emergency department is increasing to a remarkable extent, and every effort should be made to select patients who would benefit from ACT. The aim of this study was to investigate the clinical and laboratory predictors of positive CT yield in pediatric patients with nontraumatic abdominal pain. METHODS: The medical records of 739 pediatric patients who, between January 2009 and February 2014, underwent ACT for nontraumatic abdominal pain at the emergency department were reviewed retrospectively...
October 6, 2016: Pediatric Emergency Care
Derrick M Knapik, Cameron L Fausett, Allison Gilmore, Raymond W Liu
BACKGROUND: Medial epicondyle fractures may occur in isolation or with associated elbow dislocation. In the absence of open fracture or fragment incarceration, nonoperative management with immobilization has been shown to result in generally successfully outcomes comparable with those reported after surgical fixation. However, no comparative investigation has assessed outcomes after nonoperative treatment based on the presence or absence of elbow dislocation. METHODS: A systematic review was conducted investigating all studies in the literature reporting nonoperative outcomes for isolated medial epicondyle fractures and fracture-dislocations...
October 12, 2016: Journal of Pediatric Orthopedics
David Smith, High Cheek, Brenda Denson, Christopher M Pruitt
OBJECTIVE: Intranasal (IN) midazolam is a commonly prescribed medication for pediatric sedation and anxiolysis. One of its most frequently-encountered adverse effects is discomfort with administration. While it has been proposed that premedicating with lidocaine reduces this undesirable consequence, this combination has not been thoroughly researched. The objective of our study was to assess whether topical lidocaine lessens the discomfort associated with IN midazolam administration. METHODS: This was a double-blinded, randomized, placebo-controlled trial performed in an urban, academic pediatric emergency department...
October 14, 2016: Academic Emergency Medicine: Official Journal of the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine
Géraldine Layani, Richard Fleet, Renée Dallaire, Fatoumata K Tounkara, Julien Poitras, Patrick Archambault, Jean-Marc Chauny, Mathieu Ouimet, Josée Gauthier, Gilles Dupuis, Alain Tanguay, Jean-Frédéric Lévesque, Geneviève Simard-Racine, Jeannie Haggerty, France Légaré
BACKGROUND: Evidence-based indicators of quality of care have been developed to improve care and performance in Canadian emergency departments. The feasibility of measuring these indicators has been assessed mainly in urban and academic emergency departments. We sought to assess the feasibility of measuring quality-of-care indicators in rural emergency departments in Quebec. METHODS: We previously identified rural emergency departments in Quebec that offered medical coverage with hospital beds 24 hours a day, 7 days a week and were located in rural areas or small towns as defined by Statistics Canada...
July 2016: CMAJ Open
Aaron Smith, Vikrum Thimmappa, Brandon Shepherd, Meredith Ray, Anthony Sheyn, Jerome Thompson
BACKGROUND: Invasive fungal sinusitis (IFS) represents an often fatal condition within the pediatric population. In an effort to characterize demographics, treatment modalities, and prognostic factors, we performed a systematic review. METHODS: We systematically reviewed EMBASE, Medline, TRIPdatabase, SCOPUS and the Cochrane database for invasive fungal nasal and sinus infections limited to individuals <18 years of age. Case series including 3 or more patients were included...
November 2016: International Journal of Pediatric Otorhinolaryngology
Maria Claudia Rodríguez, Perla Villamor, Tatiana Castillo
INTRODUCTION: Pain is a disease by itself and it's a public health concern of major implication in children, not just because of the emotional component of the child and his family, but also due to the potential morbidity and mortality involving it. A proper assessment of pain it's a challenge in the pediatric population, due to their lack of understanding and verbalization of hurt. Additionally, a satisfactory treatment of pediatric pain can be arduous due to a lack of clinical knowledge, insufficient pediatric research, and the fear to opioid side effects and addiction...
November 2016: International Journal of Pediatric Otorhinolaryngology
Corrie E Chumpitazi, Chris A Rees, Elizabeth A Camp, M Brooke Bernhardt
BACKGROUND: The Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) changed hydrocodone-containing products (HCPs) from Schedule III to II status on October 6, 2014, making codeine-containing products (CCPs) the only non-Schedule II oral opioid agents. OBJECTIVES: We sought to describe prescribing patterns of oral opioid agents in the pediatric emergency department before and after the 2014 DEA rescheduling of HCPs. METHODS: We performed a cross-sectional study evaluating prescribing patterns in the pediatric emergency department at an urban, academic, quaternary care children's hospital system for 6 months before and 6 months after the DEA rescheduling of HCPs...
October 7, 2016: Journal of Emergency Medicine
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