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hyperosmolar therapy

Zachary D Threlkeld, Mohan Kottapally, Aimee Aysenne, Nerissa Ko
Intracranial pressure (ICP) monitoring frequently guides key decisions in the management of diseases causing intracranial hypertension. Although typically measured by invasive means, contraindications may leave the clinician with little recourse for dynamic ICP evaluation-particularly when the patient's mental status is compromised. We describe here a healthy 18-year-old woman who subacutely progressed to coma due to diffuse cerebral venous sinus thrombosis. Heparinization precluded the use of invasive ICP monitoring, and electroencephalography (EEG) was used novelly as a surrogate ICP monitor...
October 2016: Neurohospitalist
Sindhura Pisipati, Kyle A Smith, Kushal Shah, Koji Ebersole, Roukoz B Chamoun, Paul J Camarata
OBJECTIVE Laser interstitial thermal therapy (LITT) is used in numerous neurosurgical applications including lesions that are difficult to resect. Its rising popularity can be attributed to its minimally invasive approach, improved accuracy with real-time MRI guidance and thermography, and enhanced control of the laser. One of its drawbacks is the possible development of significant edema, which contributes to extended hospital stays and often necessitates hyperosmolar or steroid therapy. Here, the authors discuss the use of minimally invasive craniotomy to resect tissue ablated with LITT in attempt to minimize cerebral edema...
October 2016: Neurosurgical Focus
Rebecca R Dixon, Maryalice Nocera, Adam J Zolotor, Heather T Keenan
OBJECTIVE: To examine the use of intracranial pressure monitors and treatment for elevated intracranial pressure in children 24 months old or younger with traumatic brain injury in North Carolina between April 2009 and March 2012 and compare this with a similar cohort recruited 2000-2001. DESIGN: Prospective, observational cohort study. SETTING: Twelve PICUs in North Carolina. PATIENTS: All children 24 months old or younger with traumatic brain injury, admitted to an included PICU...
September 13, 2016: Pediatric Critical Care Medicine
Sekar Arunkumar, Bhagavatula Indira Devi, Dhaval Shukla, Madhusudhan Reddy
BACKGROUND: Intracranial pressure monitoring (ICP) is considered as optional for management of severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) in children. AIMS: This study was performed to determine whether ICP monitoring is beneficial in the managing severe TBI in children. SETTINGS AND DESIGN: Neurosurgical intensive care unit (ICU) of a tertiary care referral center; prospective observational study. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Children aged 16 years or less with severe TBI defined as "postresuscitation Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score of 8 or less admitted to an ICU" were enrolled...
September 2016: Neurology India
Usha Devi Appalsawmy, Habib Akbani
A 56-year-old man who was a Jehovah's Witness with an advanced directive against autologous procedures developed acute kidney injury needing renal replacement therapy while he was intubated and ventilated on the intensive care unit. He was being treated for hyperosmolar hyperglycaemic state. He also had a healing laparotomy wound, having undergone a splenectomy less than a month ago following a road traffic accident. His hyperkalaemia and metabolic acidosis were refractory to medical treatment. As he became oligoanuric, decision was taken to carry out acute peritoneal dialysis (PD) by inserting a Tenckhoff catheter in his abdomen using peritoneoscopic technique...
2016: BMJ Case Reports
Nadia Roumeliotis, Christian Dong, Géraldine Pettersen, Louis Crevier, Guillaume Emeriaud
OBJECTIVES: The objectives of the study are to describe the use of hyperosmolar therapy in pediatric traumatic brain injury (TBI) and examine its effect on intracranial pressure (ICP) and cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP). DESIGN: A retrospective review of patients with severe TBI admitted to the pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) was conducted. Inclusion criteria were ICP monitoring and administration of a hyperosmolar agent (20 % mannitol or 3 % hypertonic saline) within 48 h of PICU admission; for which dose and timing were recorded...
August 27, 2016: Child's Nervous System: ChNS: Official Journal of the International Society for Pediatric Neurosurgery
Anna M Ambroziak, Jerzy Szaflik, Jacek P Szaflik, Maciej Ambroziak, Jan Witkiewicz, Piotr Skopiński
The increasing understanding of immune mechanisms changed our perception of the ocular surface, which is now considered a compartment of the common mucosal immune system. It offered the possibility to alter the physiological immune response on the ocular surface and effectively combat inflammation, which impairs stability of the tear film and causes tear hyperosmolarity, causing symptoms of dry eye disease. The paper provides an overview of ocular surface anatomy and physiology, explains the underlying mechanisms of dry eye disease and discusses novel and promising treatment modalities, such as cyclosporine A, biological therapies using autologous serum and various growth factors as well as experimental treatment methods which are currently being investigated...
2016: Central-European Journal of Immunology
Ana González-Mesa, Javier Paz Moreno-Arrones, Daniele Ferrari, Miguel A Teus
PURPOSE: To analyze changes in tear osmolarity and the Ocular Surface Disease Index (OSDI) in patients after cataract surgery. DESIGN: Prospective, observational cohort study. METHODS: setting: Institutional. PATIENT POPULATION: Fifty-two patients with a unilateral cataract (study eye) scheduled for surgery and good visual function in the fellow (control eye). Patients were excluded who were receiving chronic topical therapy, such as glaucoma medications, or had a history of previous ocular surgery...
October 2016: American Journal of Ophthalmology
Elise Warcoin, Christophe Baudouin, Carole Gard, Françoise Brignole-Baudouin
PURPOSE: To investigate the pro-inflammatory intracellular mechanisms induced by an in vitro model of dry eye disease (DED) on a Hela-modified conjunctiva-derived cells in hyperosmolarity (HO) stress conditions. This study focused on CCL2 induction and explored the implications of the nuclear factor of activated T-cells 5 (NFAT5) as well as mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) and nuclear factor kappa B (NFĸB). This work was completed by an analysis of the effects of cyclosporine A (CsA), dexamethasone (Dex) and doxycycline (Dox) on HO-induced CCL2 and NFAT5 induction...
2016: PloS One
Aniruddha Tekkatte Jagannatha, Sriganesh Kamath, Indira Devi, Umamaheswara G S Rao
INTRODUCTION: Osmotherapy forms an integral part in the management of patients with severe traumatic brain injury (TBI). An ideal choice between mannitol and hypertonic saline (HTS) remains to be conclusively proven. More importantly, attention has not been paid to the long-term osmolarity changes during the therapy. The current prospective randomized study aims at evaluating the effect of serum and urine osmolarity and sodium achieved with mannitol and HTS on intracranial pressure (ICP) and outcome...
August 2016: Neurosurgery
Connie Yang, Mark Chilvers, Mark Montgomery, Sarah J Nolan
BACKGROUND: Dornase alfa is currently used as a mucolytic to treat pulmonary disease (the major cause of morbidity and mortality) in cystic fibrosis. It reduces mucus viscosity in the lungs, promoting improved clearance of secretions. This is an update of a previously published review. OBJECTIVES: To determine whether the use of dornase alfa in cystic fibrosis is associated with improved mortality and morbidity compared to placebo or other medications that improve airway clearance, and to identify any adverse events associated with its use...
2016: Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews
David Roh, Alexander E Merkler, Fawaz Al-Mufti, Nicholas Morris, Sachin Agarwal, Jan Claassen, Soojin Park
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
April 19, 2016: Neurology
Guillermo Umpierrez, Mary Korytkowski
Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA), hyperglycaemic hyperosmolar state (HHS) and hypoglycaemia are serious complications of diabetes mellitus that require prompt recognition, diagnosis and treatment. DKA and HHS are characterized by insulinopaenia and severe hyperglycaemia; clinically, these two conditions differ only by the degree of dehydration and the severity of metabolic acidosis. The overall mortality recorded among children and adults with DKA is <1%. Mortality among patients with HHS is ~10-fold higher than that associated with DKA...
April 2016: Nature Reviews. Endocrinology
A V Kustov, A L Strelnikov, A O Airapetyan, M A Moryganov, N I Zhuravleva
The paper presents the results of the 1-year screening of biochemical parameters of urine in female patient with recurrent calcium urate urolithiasis. Based on the data of quantitative X-ray phase analysis of the composition of stone and a complex of clinical and laboratory examination, reasons for recurrent stone formation were determined. The main reasons included hypocitraturia, hyperosmolarity of urine and uric acid diathesis. Therapy with citrate mixtures and adequate water schedule (daily urine--2-2.5 liters) for 10 weeks allowed to increase the urinary pH, led to 2...
September 2015: Urologii︠a︡
Rosalinda Madonna, Gaia Giovannelli, Pamela Confalone, Francesca Vera Renna, Yong-Jian Geng, Raffaele De Caterina
BACKGROUND: We tested the hypothesis that glucose-induced hyperosmolarity, occurring in diabetic hyperglycemia, promotes retinal angiogenesis, and that interference with osmolarity signaling ameliorates excessive angiogenesis and retinopathy in vitro and in vivo. METHODS AND RESULTS: We incubated human aortic (HAECs) and dermal microvascular endothelial cells (HMVECs) with glucose or mannitol for 24 h and tested them for protein levels and in vitro angiogenesis...
2016: Cardiovascular Diabetology
Michael Grabner, Xiaomei Peng, Caroline Geremakis, Jay Bae
BACKGROUND: Canagliflozin is the first sodium-glucose co-transporter-2 (SGLT-2) inhibitor-a new class of oral antidiabetic (OAD) medication-approved for type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) treatment in the United States. Approved less than 2 years ago, use of canagliflozin is largely uncharacterized. OBJECTIVE: To investigate and compare baseline demographic, clinical, and economic characteristics of patients initiating canagliflozin and dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors in the real-world setting...
December 2015: Journal of Managed Care & Specialty Pharmacy
Myles Dustin Boone, Achikam Oren-Grinberg, Timothy Matthew Robinson, Clark C Chen, Ekkehard M Kasper
BACKGROUND: Intracranial hypertension, defined as an intracranial pressure (ICP) >20 mmHg for a period of more than 5 min, worsens neurologic outcome in traumatic brain injury (TBI). While several mechanisms contribute to poor outcome, impaired cerebral perfusion appears to be a highly significant common denominator. Management guidelines from the Brain Trauma Foundation recommend measuring ICP to guide therapy. In particular, hyperosmolar therapy, which includes mannitol or hypertonic saline (HTS), is frequently administered to reduce ICP...
2015: Surgical Neurology International
Gretchen M Brophy, Theresa Human, Lori Shutter
The appropriate use of medications during Emergency Neurological Life Support (ENLS) is essential to optimize patient care. Important considerations when choosing the appropriate agent include the patient's organ function and medication allergies, potential adverse drug effects, drug interactions, and critical illness and aging pathophysiologic changes. Critical medications used during ENLS include hyperosmolar therapy, anticonvulsants, antithrombotics, anticoagulant reversal and hemostatic agents, anti-shivering agents, neuromuscular blockers, antihypertensive agents, sedatives, vasopressors and inotropes, and antimicrobials...
December 2015: Neurocritical Care
Katja-Nicole Adamik, Emmanuelle Butty, Judith Howard
BACKGROUND: Hyperosmolar therapy, using either mannitol or hypertonic saline (HTS), is considered the treatment of choice for intracranial hypertension. However, hyperosmolar agents may impair coagulation and platelet function, limiting their use in patients at risk for hemorrhage. Despite this, studies evaluating the effects of mannitol compared to other hyperosmolar agents in dogs are largely lacking. The aim of this study was to compare the in vitro effects on global hemostasis and platelet function of 20% mannitol and 3% HTS on canine blood...
2015: BMC Veterinary Research
Thomas M Leventhal, Kathleen D Liu
Although relatively rare in the United States, acute liver failure (ALF) is associated with very high rates of morbidity and mortality. A leading cause of morbidity and mortality is cerebral edema and intracranial hypertension. Hypothermia, osmotic diuretics, and hyperosmolar therapy are commonly used to manage these complications; however, when these are ineffective, renal replacement therapy may be needed for volume management. Acute kidney injury is a common complication of ALF and may arise from a number of etiologies, including hepatorenal syndrome and acute tubular necrosis...
September 2015: Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease
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