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Clinical Hypnosis and pain

Soohyun Kim, Lawrence Chang, Bianca Weinstock-Guttman, Sirin Gandhi, Dejan Jakimovski, Ellen Carl, Robert Zivadinov, Murali Ramanathan
OBJECTIVES: To investigate the factors associated with complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) usage by multiple sclerosis (MS) patients. Design, Setting/Location: Single-center, prospective clinical study at an academic MS center in the northeastern United States. METHODS: This study included CAM data from 524 MS patients and 304 healthy controls (HC) enrolled in a prospective study of clinical, neuroimaging, and environmental risk factors in MS at an academic MS Center...
March 2, 2018: Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine: Research on Paradigm, Practice, and Policy
Edward F Mackey
The effects of hypnosis/therapeutic suggestion in connection with intravenous sedation and surgery have been described in many clinical publications; however, few randomized, controlled, and blind studies have been performed in the outpatient area. The original study published in 2010 aimed to evaluate the use of hypnosis/therapeutic suggestion as an adjunct to intravenous sedation in patients having third molar removal in an outpatient setting. The patients were randomly assigned to a treatment or control group...
April 2018: American Journal of Clinical Hypnosis
Peter R Giacobbi, Jonathan Stewart, Keeley Chaffee, Anna-Marie Jaeschke, Meagan Stabler, George A Kelley
Introduction: Guided imagery involves the controlled visualization of detailed mental images. This integrative health technique is used for healing, health maintenance, or the treatment of specific conditions. Guided imagery is an integral part of mindfulness meditation, hypnosis, and various relaxation exercises. However, evidence to support the widespread use and dissemination of guided imagery interventions has been lacking. The purposes of this scoping review were to document the scope of health outcomes and disease processes examined by guided imagery researchers and the journal outlets where this work has been published...
December 2017: Progress in Preventive Medicine
Mathieu Landry, Moriah Stendel, Michel Landry, Amir Raz
Palliative care spans a wide-ranging spectrum: from pain-management to spiritual support. As the demand for end-of-life care increases, so does the demand for innovative, effective, interventions. Mind-body techniques seem especially advantageous in a palliative context. Here we show that hypnosis serves an excellent adjunct therapy in palliative care to boost the efficacy of standard treatments. With the overarching goal of bridging clinical and scientific insights, we outline how five core principles of hypnosis can benefit the diverse needs of palliative care...
January 2018: Annals of Palliative Medicine
Francisco Xavier De Almeida-Marques, José Sánchez-Blanco, Francisco Javier Cano-García
To determine whether hypnosis is more effective than conventional interviewing to find traumatic life events in patients with fibromyalgia, we carried out a within-subject experimental design with complete intragroup counterbalancing. Thirty-two women under care in a public primary care center gave 2 identical interviews, with an interval of 3 months, in which the occurrence of traumatic life events was explored, once in a state of wakefulness and once in a state of hypnosis. The state of consciousness was evaluated using 3 measures: bispectral index, skin conductance level, and pain intensity...
January 2018: International Journal of Clinical and Experimental Hypnosis
Giovanna Squintani, Maria P Brugnoli, Emanuela Pasin, Alessia Segatti, Elisa Concon, Enrico Polati, Bruno Bonetti, Angela Matinella
BACKGROUND: Hypnotic analgesia is one of the most effective nonpharmacological methods for pain control. Hypnosis and distraction of attention from pain might share similar mechanisms by which brain responses to painful stimulation could be similarly reduced in both states. There is ample evidence for the efficacy of clinical hypnosis as a psychological intervention in the treatment of acute or chronic pain. Results are conflicting, however, with some studies showing an increase, others a reduction, and others still no change in the amplitude of event-related brain potentials during hypnosis as compared to control conditions...
November 10, 2017: Annals of Palliative Medicine
Consuelo Casula
In this article, I do not intend to present the many and well-known treatments for relieving pain and distress symptoms of the physical body, damaged by terminal diseases, such as cancer, AIDS, multiple sclerosis. In this article, I'd rather focus my attention on clinical hypnosis for subjects who, freed from physical pain, thanks to palliative care, are open to receiving comfort and support for their psychological and spiritual suffering. The intent of this article is to express how clinical hypnosis can harmoniously integrate psychological and spiritual aspects so that the terminal patient can make peace with his/her past, with the people who have hurt him/her, and with the people who will suffer because of his/her death...
September 28, 2017: Annals of Palliative Medicine
M Berlière, F Roelants, C Watremez, M A Docquier, N Piette, S Lamerant, V Megevand, A Van Maanen, P Piette, A Gerday, F P Duhoux
BACKGROUND: In oncology, hypnosis has been used for pain relief in metastatic patients but rarely for induction of anesthesia. MATERIAL AND METHOD: Between January 2010 and October 2015, 300 patients from our Breast Clinic (Cliniques universitaires Saint-Luc, Université catholique de Louvain) were included in an observational, non-randomized study approved by our local ethics committee ( - NCT03003611). The hypothesis of our study was that hypnosis intervention could decrease side effects of breast surgery...
February 2018: Breast: Official Journal of the European Society of Mastology
Aanchal Satija, Sushma Bhatnagar
Cancer patients are often poly-symptomatic which distressingly affects their quality of lives (QOLs). Alhough, conventional management provides adequate symptom control, yet is coupled with some limitations. Complementary therapies (CTs) have shown beneficial effects in cancer patients for symptomatic relief. The aim of this article is to provide evidence-based review of commonly used CTs for symptom management in cancer care. Hypnosis has promising evidence to be used for managing symptoms such as pain, chemotherapy-induced nausea/vomiting, distress, fatigue, and hot flashes...
October 2017: Indian Journal of Palliative Care
Patrícia Ribeiro Pinto, Ana Cristina Paredes, Patrício Costa, Manuela Carvalho, Manuela Lopes, Susana Fernandes, Susana Pedras, Armando Almeida
INTRODUCTION: Haemophilia is a bleeding disorder associated with significant pain, emotional distress, quality of life (QoL) impairment and considerable healthcare costs. Psychosocial health and effective pain management are considered essential end points for optimal haemophilia care, but there is a significant gap in evidence-based treatments targeting these outcomes in people with haemophilia (PWH). Psychological interventions are cost-effective in promoting emotional well-being, QoL and pain control, although these have been scarcely used in haemophilia field...
September 3, 2017: BMJ Open
Stefan J Friedrichsdorf, Daniel P Kohen
At least 8 million children would need specialized pediatric palliative care (PPC) services annually worldwide, and of the more than 42,000 children and teenagers dying annually in the United States, at least 15,000 children would require PPC. Unfortunately, even in resource-rich countries the majority of children dying from serious advanced illnesses are suffering from unrelieved, distressing symptoms such as pain, dyspnea, nausea, vomiting, and anxiety. State of the art treatment and prevention of those symptoms requires employing multi-modal therapies, commonly including pharmacology, rehabilitation, procedural intervention, psychology, and integrative modalities...
June 27, 2017: Annals of Palliative Medicine
Ravi R Bhatt, Sarah R Martin, Subhadra Evans, Kirsten Lung, Thomas D Coates, Lonnie K Zeltzer, Jennie C Tsao
BACKGROUND: Vaso-occlusive pain crises (VOCs) are the "hallmark" of sickle-cell disease (SCD) and can lead to sympathetic nervous system dysfunction. Increased sympathetic nervous system activation during VOCs and/or pain can result in vasoconstriction, which may increase the risk for subsequent VOCs and pain. Hypnosis is a neuromodulatory intervention that may attenuate vascular and pain responsiveness. Due to the lack of laboratory-controlled pain studies in patients with SCD and healthy controls, the specific effects of hypnosis on acute pain-associated vascular responses are unknown...
2017: Journal of Pain Research
Katherine Cárdenas, Mariana Aranda
INTRODUCTION: The phantom limb pain has been described as a condition in which patients experience a feeling of itching, spasm or pain in a limb or body part that has been previously amputated. Such pain can be induced by a conflict between the representation of the visual and proprioceptive feedback of the previously healthy limb. The phantom limb pain occurs in at least 42 to 90% of amputees. Regular drug treatment of phantom limb pain is almost never effective. METHODS: A systematic review of the literature was conducted in Medline and Cochrane using the MESH terms "phantom limb pain" and "psychotherapy", published in the last 10 years, in English and Spanish, finding 49 items...
July 2017: Revista Colombiana de Psiquiatría
Joachim Keppler
Owing to the increasing importance of clinical hypnosis in pain therapy and palliative care, there is a growing interest in uncovering the mechanism underlying hypnotic analgesia. The neurophysiological findings suggest that the hypnotic state is associated with an altered operating mode of the brain that is clearly different from the normal operating mode. While in the normal operating mode a dolorogenic stimulus induces a highly synchronized large-scale activity pattern that leads to the experience of pain, the altered operating mode inhibits the synchronization of spatially divided brain regions...
May 3, 2017: Annals of Palliative Medicine
Joshua Wortzel, David Spiegel
Cancer affects a growing proportion of the population as survival improves. The illness and its treatment brings a substantial burden of symptoms, including pain, anxiety, insomnia, and grief. Here, the uses of hypnosis in the treatment of these cancer-related problems will be reviewed. The utility of measuring hypnotizability in the clinical setting will be discussed. The current neurobiology of hypnotizability and hypnosis will be reviewed. Methods and results of using hypnosis for pain control in acute and chronic settings will be presented...
July 2017: American Journal of Clinical Hypnosis
Daniel L Handel, Sylvain Néron
Advanced cancer often produces significant symptoms such as pain, anxiety, insomnia, nausea, and cachexia; many symptoms require medication adjustments in dose and route of administration, and most patients have significant symptom burdens near the end of life. Treatment strategies that integrate mind-body approaches, such as hypnosis, to improve symptoms are increasingly being studied and utilized. The current article addresses the role for adjunctive hypnotic approaches to relieve suffering from pain and other symptoms, while fostering hope, even in the midst of advancing illness, similar to Snyder's (2002) metaphorical painting of "a personal rainbow of the mind" (p...
July 2017: American Journal of Clinical Hypnosis
Guy H Montgomery, Madalina Sucala, Tessa Baum, Julie B Schnur
Hypnosis has been shown to alleviate symptoms and side effects of cancer and its treatment. However, less is known about the use of hypnosis at the end of life in individuals with cancer. Our goal was to systematically review the literature on the use of hypnosis to manage the most common symptoms of end-of-life cancer patients: fatigue, sleep disturbances, pain, appetite loss, and dyspnea. EMBASE, MEDLINE, COCHRANE, PsychINFO, and SCOPUS databases were searched from inception through November 7, 2016. No studies met the inclusion criteria...
July 2017: International Journal of Clinical and Experimental Hypnosis
A Ramírez-Carrasco, C Butrón-Téllez Girón, O Sanchez-Armass, M Pierdant-Pérez
Background and Objective. Anxiety/pain are experiences that make dental treatment difficult for children, especially during the time of anesthesia. Hypnosis is used in pediatric clinical situations to modify thinking, behavior, and perception as well as, recently, in dentistry; therefore the aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of hypnosis combined with conventional behavior management techniques during infiltration anesthetic. Methods. Anxiety/pain were assessed with the FLACC scale during the anesthetic moment, as well as heart rate variability and skin conductance before and during the anesthetic moment, between the control and experimental group...
2017: Pain Research & Management: the Journal of the Canadian Pain Society
Nathalie Duparc-Alegria, Karine Tiberghien, Hendy Abdoul, Souhayl Dahmani, Corinne Alberti, Anne-Francoise Thiollier
AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To assess the impact of a short hypnotic session on postoperative anxiety and pain in major orthopaedic surgery. BACKGROUND: Despite specific information given before a scheduled paediatric surgery, perioperative anxiety can become important. DESIGN: Randomised Clinical Study. METHODS: The study is an open single-centre randomised clinical study comparing a "control" group versus a "hypnosis" group receiving a short hypnosis pre-induction session as additional experimental analgesic procedure...
January 2018: Journal of Clinical Nursing
Timothy Culbert
It has been well-established that a variety of mind-body (MB) techniques, including yoga, mental imagery, hypnosis, biofeedback, and meditation, are effective at addressing symptoms such as pain, anxiety, nausea, and insomnia, as well as helping with a wide variety of medical, emotional, and behavioral issues in pediatric populations. In addition, MB skills can also be health promoting in the long-term, and with regular practice, could potentially contribute to longer attention spans, social skills, emotional regulation, and enhanced immune system functioning...
April 4, 2017: Children
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