Read by QxMD icon Read

Chagas disease congenital

Rafael Bello Corassa, Carmen Aceijas, Paula Aryane Brito Alves, Hemda Garelick
AIMS: This article aimed to provide a critical review of the evolution of Chagas' disease (ChD) in Brazil, its magnitude, historical development and management, and challenges for the future. METHODS: A literature search was performed using PubMed, SciELO and Google Scholar and throughout collected articles' references. Narrative analysis was structured around five main themes identified: vector transmission, control programme, transfusion, oral and congenital transmission...
October 10, 2016: Perspectives in Public Health
Rodolfo A Kolliker-Frers, Ivan Insua, Gabriela Razzitte, Francisco Capani
INTRODUCTION: Argentina has been a preferential target for Bolivian immigrants for decades. The relatively recent migratory flux includes Germany, France, the United States, Australia, Japan, and some Latin American countries. The aim of this cross-sectional study was to describe the prevalence of Chagas disease in pregnant women, analyzing the Bolivian-specific Chagas prevalence as the main contributor of migratory populations from Chagas disease-endemic areas to Buenos Aires city, Argentina, and to evaluate the impact of these migrant influxes on the process of the "urbanization" of the disease in reference hospital José Maria Ramos Mejia (JMRM)...
September 30, 2016: Journal of Infection in Developing Countries
C Díaz-Luján, M F Triquell, C Castillo, D Hardisson, U Kemmerling, R E Fretes
American trypanosomiasis has long been a neglected disease endemic in LatinAmerica, but congenital transmission has now spread Chagas disease to cause a global health problem. As the early stages of the infection of placental tissue and the vertical transmission by Trypanosoma cruzi are still not well understood, it is important to investigate the relevance of the first structure of the placental barrier in chorionic villi infection by T. cruzi during the initial stage of the infection. Explants of human chorionic villi from healthy pregnant women at term were denuded of their syncytiotrophoblast and co-cultured for 3h, 24h and 96h with 800,000 trypomastigotes (simulating acute infection)...
September 26, 2016: Acta Tropica
Laura Mayela Montes-Rincón, Lucio Galaviz-Silva, Francisco Ernesto González-Bravo, Zinnia Judith Molina-Garza
Chagas disease is caused by an infection with the protozoan hemoflagellate Trypanosoma cruzi, and it is a major endemic health problem in Latin America. The congenital route is one of the main non-vectorial pathways of transmission, which can arise either in the chronic or acute phase of maternal infection. Serological screening of T. cruzi infection was performed in 520 pregnant women and newborns at the Hospital General Regional de León, Guanajuato, Mexico, between 2014 and 2015. Anti-T. cruzi antibodies were detected in 20 mothers (4%) by ELISA and HIA with four PCR-positive newborn cases...
September 3, 2016: Acta Tropica
Ana Liempi, Christian Castillo, Ileana Carrillo, Lorena Muñoz, Daniel Droguett, Norbel Galanti, Juan Diego Maya, Ulrike Kemmerling
Congenital Chagas disease, caused by Trypanosoma cruzi, is partially responsible for the progressive globalization of Chagas disease despite of its low transmission rate. The probability of congenital transmission depends on complex interactions between the parasite, the maternal and fetus/newborn immune responses and placental factors, being the latter the least studied one. During transplacental transmission, the parasite must cross the placental barrier where the trophoblast, a continuous renewing epithelium, is the first tissue to have contact with the parasite...
October 2016: Microbial Pathogenesis
Jorge Murillo, Lina M Bofill, Hector Bolivar, Carlos Torres-Viera, Julio A Urbina, Daniel Benhayon, Jaime R Torres
Two brothers with congenitally-acquired Chagas' disease (CD) diagnosed during adulthood are reported. The patients were born in the USA to a mother from Bolivia who on subsequent assessment was found to be serologically positive for Trypanosoma cruzi. Serologic screening of all pregnant women who migrated from countries with endemic CD is strongly recommended.
2016: IDCases
Genevieve A Houston-Ludlam, A Trey Belew, Najib M El-Sayed
Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas Disease, is phylogeneticaly distributed into nearly identical genetic strains which show divergent clinical presentations including differences in rates of cardiomyopathy in humans, different vector species and transmission cycles, differential congenital transmission in a mouse model, and differing immune and heart inflammation response in dogs. The population structure of these strains divides into two groups, which are geographically and clinically distinct...
2016: PloS One
Andrés Alarcón, Mackenzie Morgan, Susan P Montgomery, Louis Scavo, Edward C C Wong, Andrea Hahn, Barbara Jantausch
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
July 27, 2016: Journal of the Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society
Susan P Montgomery, Monica E Parise, Ellen M Dotson, Stephanie R Bialek
Chagas disease, caused by the parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, affects more than 5 million people worldwide leading to serious heart and gastrointestinal disease in a proportion of chronically infected patients. Important modes of transmission include vector-borne, congenital, and via blood transfusion or organ transplant from an infected donor. Vector-borne transmission of Chagas disease occurs in the Americas, including the southern half of North America, where the specific vector insects (triatomines), T. cruzi, and infected reservoir mammalian hosts are found...
July 11, 2016: American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene
Rocio Paucar, Elsa Moreno-Viguri, Silvia Pérez-Silanes
Chagas disease or American trypanosomiasis is a neglected tropical disease caused by the parasite Trypanosoma cruzi. Although the number of infected individuals has decreased, about 6-7 million people are infected worldwide. The chemotherapy drugs currently used are limited to benznidazole and nifurtimox. They are effective in acute phase, congenital transmission and children with chronic infection; however, recent clinical trials have shown limitations in adults with chronic infection, presenting drawbacks during the treatment...
June 26, 2016: Current Medicinal Chemistry
Ileana Carrillo, Daniel Droguett, Christian Castillo, Ana Liempi, Lorena Muñoz, Juan Diego Maya, Norbel Galanti, Ulrike Kemmerling
Congenital Chagas disease is caused by the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi that must cross the placental barrier during transmission. The trophoblast constitutes the first tissue in contact with the maternal-blood circulating parasite. Importantly, the congenital transmission rates are low, suggesting the presence of local placental defense mechanisms. Cellular proliferation and differentiation as well as apoptotic cell death are induced by the parasite and constitute part of the epithelial turnover of the trophoblast, which has been suggested to be part of those placental defenses...
September 2016: Experimental Parasitology
Gene F Kwan, Bongani M Mayosi, Ana O Mocumbi, J Jaime Miranda, Majid Ezzati, Yogesh Jain, Gisela Robles, Emelia J Benjamin, S V Subramanian, Gene Bukhman
The poorest billion people are distributed throughout the world, though most are concentrated in rural sub-Saharan Africa and South Asia. Cardiovascular disease (CVD) data can be sparse in low- and middle-income countries beyond urban centers. Despite this urban bias, CVD registries from the poorest countries have long revealed a predominance of nonatherosclerotic stroke, hypertensive heart disease, nonischemic and Chagas cardiomyopathies, rheumatic heart disease, and congenital heart anomalies, among others...
June 14, 2016: Circulation
Bibiana J Volta, Patricia L Bustos, Rita L Cardoni, Ana M De Rissio, Susana A Laucella, Jacqueline Bua
Trypanosoma cruzi, the causing agent of Chagas disease, leads to an activation of the immune system in congenitally infected infants. In this study, we measured a set of cytokines/chemokines and the levels of parasitemia by quantitative PCR in the circulation of neonates born to T. cruzi-infected mothers to evaluate the predictive value of these mediators as biomarkers of congenital transmission. We conducted a retrospective cohort study of 35 infants with congenital T. cruzi infection, of which 15 and 10 infants had been diagnosed by detection of parasites by microscopy in the first and sixth month after delivery, respectively, and the remaining 10 had been diagnosed by the presence of T...
June 1, 2016: Journal of Immunology: Official Journal of the American Association of Immunologists
Fanny Concha Valdez, Clotilde Marín, Javier Flores Abuxapqui, Javier Escobedo Ortegón, Rocío Cañas, Manuel Sánchez Moreno
BACKGROUND: Chagas disease caused by Trypanosoma cruzi is endemic in Latin America. Human infection is mainly spread by Triatominae insects. Other forms of transmission are congenital, blood transfusion and organ transplantation. METHODS: Anti-T. cruzi antibodies were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and Western blot (WB) in 155 serum samples from mothers and their babies. Indirect immunofluorescence (IFA) and a commercial test were used to validate efficacy of a specific ELISA-iron-excreted superoxide dismutase assay...
July 2016: Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal
Antoni Soriano-Arandes, Andrea Angheben, Nuria Serre-Delcor, Begoña Treviño-Maruri, Jordi Gómez I Prat, Yves Jackson
OBJECTIVES: Identifying pregnant women infected with Trypanosoma cruzi is one of the major challenges for preventing and controlling Chagas disease (CD) in non-endemic countries. The aim of this paper was to perform a policy evaluation of the current practices of congenital Chagas disease (CCD) control in non-endemic countries and to propose specific targets for enhanced interventions to tackle this emerging health problem outside the endemic areas of Latin America. METHODS: We conducted a mixed method review of CCD policy strategies by searching the literature in the PubMed, Google Scholar and the World Health Organization (WHO) databases using the key terms 'CCD', 'paediatric Chagas disease' and 'non-endemic countries'; as free text and combined as one phrase to increase the search sensitivity...
May 2016: Tropical Medicine & International Health: TM & IH
José Bermudez, Carolina Davies, Analía Simonazzi, Juan Pablo Real, Santiago Palma
One of the most significant health problems in the American continent in terms of human health, and socioeconomic impact is Chagas disease, caused by the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi. Infection was originally transmitted by reduviid insects, congenitally from mother to fetus, and by oral ingestion in sylvatic/rural environments, but blood transfusions, organ transplants, laboratory accidents, and sharing of contaminated syringes also contribute to modern day transmission. Likewise, Chagas disease used to be endemic from Northern Mexico to Argentina, but migrations have earned it global...
April 2016: Acta Tropica
Tereza Augusta Grillo, Guilherme Rafael S Athayde, Ana Flávia L Belfort, Reynaldo C Miranda, Andrea Z Beaton, Bruno R Nascimento
Subvalvular left ventricular aneurysm is a rare disease of obscure origin suggesting unique causes such as congenital, traumatic, and inflammatory or infectious diseases. Its mortality is closely related to heart failure, mitral insufficiency, thromboembolic phenomena, and cardiac arrhythmias. Although association with coronary artery disease is not described, the compression of epicardial vessels by the aneurysm may lead to ischemic manifestations. We report here a case of mitral subvalvular left ventricular aneurysm of probable chagasic origin, in a patient with normal left ventricular function evolving with repeated episodes of monomorphic ventricular tachycardia, despite noninducible electrophysiological testing and the use of optimal medical treatment, including amiodarone...
2015: Case Reports in Cardiology
Gabriela Cormick, Alvaro Ciganda, Maria L Cafferata, Michael J Ripple, Sergio Sosa-Estani, Pierre Buekens, José M Belizán, Fernando Althabe
BACKGROUND: Diagnosis of congenital Chagas disease occurs at 9 months of age, making effective treatment challenging due to loss to follow-up. Mobile health (mHealth) has been utilized to improve communication and treatment adherence in many chronic diseases, although no studies of mHealth in Trypanosoma cruzi-infected individuals have been conducted. Text message interventions, a subset of mHealth, has shown to improve appointment attendance and is relatively simple to set up, thus making it an ideal mechanism to facilitate communication with individuals in low-resource settings...
September 29, 2015: BMC Research Notes
Jeffrey D Stanaway, Gregory Roth
Chagas disease, caused by infection with the protozoa Trypanosoma cruzi is transmitted most often by Triatominae insect vectors, but also through blood transfusion, organ transplant, and congenital transmission. Between 5 and 18 million people are currently infected and the infection is estimated to cause more than 10,000 deaths annually. The disease has 3 phases: acute, indeterminate, and chronic. The acute phase immediately follows infection. It is typically asymptomatic but produces fever and malaise in up to 5% of people...
September 2015: Global Heart
Morven S Edwards, Marcia A Rench, Charles W Todd, Nancy Czaicki, Francis J Steurer, Caryn Bern, Susan P Montgomery
Perinatal screening for Trypanosoma cruzi in a cohort of 4000 predominantly Hispanic women in southern Texas revealed that Chagas disease occurs with sufficient frequency (0.25%) that targeted perinatal screening should be considered to identify infected mothers and infants at risk for congenital infection.
March 2015: Journal of the Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society
Fetch more papers »
Fetching more papers... Fetching...
Read by QxMD. Sign in or create an account to discover new knowledge that matter to you.
Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"