Read by QxMD icon Read

Cardiovascular risk HIV

Herman G Sprenger, Wouter F Bierman, Melanie I Martes, Reindert Graaff, Tjip S Van Der Werf, Andries J Smit
OBJECTIVE: HIV-1 infection is associated with an increased cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk. Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) are formed as stable markers of glycemic and oxidative stress. Skin autofluorescence (SAF) as marker of accumulated AGEs is increased and predictive of CVD events in diabetes mellitus, chronic kidney disease (CKD) and pre-existing CVD. We determined SAF levels in HIV-1 infected patients, testing the hypothesis that SAF predicts CVD events in HIV infection...
October 18, 2016: AIDS
Ganiyu Amusa, Babatunde Awokola, Godsent Isiguzo, James Onuh, Samuel Uguru, David Oke, Solomon Danbauchi, Basil Okeahialam
OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the prevalence of Hypertension and associated risk factors in HIV+ adults and assessment of these risks using the Framingham risk score 'FRS'. DESIGN AND METHOD: A cross-sectional analytical study. One hundred and fifty consecutive HIV+ adults presenting at the HIV clinic of Jos University Teaching Hospital (90 on HAART) with 50 HIV- as controls were recruited. Relevant history, physical examination (including blood pressure measured according to standard guidelines), laboratory specimen (fasting plasma sugar and lipids, CD4 count and viral load) and electrocardiogram were obtained from the participants...
September 2016: Journal of Hypertension
Ann J Melvin, Grace Montepiedra, Lisa Aaron, William A Meyer, Hans M Spiegel, William Borkowsky, Mark J Abzug, Brookie M Best, Marilyn J Crain, Peggy R Borum, Bobbie Graham, Patricia Anthony, Katherine Shin, George K Siberry
BACKGROUND: HIV-infected children receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART) have increased prevalence of hyperlipidemia and risk factors for cardiovascular disease. No studies have investigated the efficacy and safety of statins in this population. METHODS: HIV-infected youth aged 10 - < 24 years on stable ART with low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C) ≥130 mg/dL for ≥ 6 months initiated atorvastatin 10mg once daily. Atorvastatin was increased to 20mg if LDL-C efficacy criteria (LDL-C < 110 mg/dL or decreased ≥30% from baseline) were not met at week 4...
October 3, 2016: Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal
Vibe Ballegaard, Ulrik Ralfkiaer, Karin K Pedersen, Malene Hove, Simon Koplev, Peter Brændstrup, Lars P Ryder, Hans O Madsen, Jan Gerstoft, Kirsten Grønbæk, Susanne D Nielsen
OBJECTIVE: Inflammation may contribute to increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) in HIV-1 infection. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are involved in the regulation of inflammation. In treated HIV-1-infected individuals, we aimed to identify differentially expressed miRNAs with known roles in inflammation and CVD risk, and to investigate associations between these and systemic inflammation. METHODS: In a screening cohort including 14 HIV-1-infected individuals and nine uninfected controls microarray profiling was performed using peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC)...
October 3, 2016: Journal of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndromes: JAIDS
David B Hanna, Molly Jung, Xiaonan Xue, Kathryn Anastos, Jennifer M Cocohoba, Mardge H Cohen, Elizabeth T Golub, Nancy A Hessol, Alexandra M Levine, Tracey E Wilson, Mary A Young, Robert C Kaplan
Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is increasingly common among women with HIV, but literature on nonlipid CVD risk factor management is lacking. We examined semiannual trends from 2006 to 2014 in hypertension treatment and control (blood pressure <140/90 mmHg), diabetes treatment and control (fasting glucose <130 mg/dL), and smoking quit rates in the Women's Interagency HIV Study. Unadjusted and adjusted Poisson regression models tested time trends and differences between HIV+ and HIV- women. Among antiretroviral therapy (ART) users, we examined the association of ART adherence and virologic suppression with each outcome...
October 2016: AIDS Patient Care and STDs
Zulfa Abrahams, Naomi Levitt, Maia Lesosky, Gary Maartens, Joel Dave
Long-term use of antiretroviral therapy (ART) increases the risk of developing lipodystrophy. Few studies from Africa have used longitudinal data to assess the development of lipoatrophy and lipohypertrophy. We use clinical anthropometry and dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) to describe changes in body fat distribution over a 24-month period in individuals initiated on ART. A convenience sample of black South Africans (55 men and 132 women) were recruited and followed for 24 months after commencing ART...
October 2016: AIDS Patient Care and STDs
Mitch M Matoga, Mina C Hosseinipour, Evgenia Aga, Heather J Ribaudo, Nagalingeswaran Kumarasamy, John Bartlett, Michael D Hughes
BACKGROUND: Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is an emerging concern for HIV-infected patients. Hyperlipidemia is a risk factor for CVD and a complication of protease-inhibitor-based antiretroviral therapy, but little is known about its incidence and risk factors in treated patients in resource-limited settings (RLS). METHODS: We conducted a secondary analysis of ACTG A5230 trial in which HIV-infected adults from India, Malawi, Tanzania, Thailand and South Africa, with virologic relapse on first line therapy were initiated on lopinavir/ritonavir (LPV/r) monotherapy...
October 14, 2016: Antiviral Therapy
Nicholas T Funderburg, Dihua Xu, Martin P Playford, Aditya A Joshi, Adriana Andrade, Daniel R Kuritzkes, Michael M Lederman, Nehal N Mehta
BACKGROUND: Persons infected with HIV often have altered lipid profiles that may be affected by antiretroviral therapies (ART). Traditional lipid measurements may be insufficient to assess cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk in this population. METHODS: We report results from 39 ART-naïve participants in a substudy of A5248, a single-arm study of raltegravir (RAL), emtricitabine/tenofovir administration. Samples were collected at baseline, 12, 24, and 48 weeks after ART initiation...
October 14, 2016: Antiviral Therapy
Matthew J Feinstein, Brian Poole, Pedro Engel Gonzalez, Anna E Pawlowski, Daniel Schneider, Tim S Provias, Frank J Palella, Chad J Achenbach, Donald M Lloyd-Jones
BACKGROUND: HIV-infected persons develop coronary artery disease (CAD) more commonly and earlier than uninfected persons; however, the role of non-invasive testing to stratify CAD risk in HIV is not well defined. METHODS AND RESULTS: Patients were selected from a single-center electronic cohort of HIV-infected patients and uninfected controls matched 1:2 on age, sex, race, and type of cardiovascular testing performed. Patients with abnormal echocardiographic or nuclear stress testing who subsequently underwent coronary angiography were included...
October 13, 2016: Journal of Nuclear Cardiology: Official Publication of the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology
Matthew J Feinstein, Milana Bogorodskaya, Gerald S Bloomfield, Rajesh Vedanthan, Mark J Siedner, Gene F Kwan, Christopher T Longenecker
Effective combination antiretroviral therapy (ART) has enabled human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection to evolve from a generally fatal condition to a manageable chronic disease. This transition began two decades ago in high-income countries and has more recently begun in lower income, HIV endemic countries (HIV-ECs). With this transition, there has been a concurrent shift in clinical and public health burden from AIDS-related complications and opportunistic infections to those associated with well-controlled HIV disease, including cardiovascular disease (CVD)...
November 2016: Current Cardiology Reports
Lisa Rosenblatt, Amanda M Farr, Ella T Nkhoma, James K Nelson, Corey Ritchings, Stephen S Johnston
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
October 7, 2016: BMC Infectious Diseases
Claudio Babiloni, Alfredo Pennica, Paolo Capotosto, Paolo Onorati, Chiara Muratori, Stefano Ferracuti, Paolo Roma, Valentina Correr, Elisa Piccinni, Giuseppe Noce, Claudio Del Percio, Susanna Cordone, Cristina Limatola, Andrea Soricelli, Francesco Di Campli, Laura Gianserra, Lorenzo Ciullini, Antonio Aceti, Magdalena Viscione, Elisabetta Teti, Loredana Sarmati, Massimo Andreoni
OBJECTIVE: Cortical sources of electroencephalographic (EEG) rhythms were investigated in two sub-populations of naïve HIV subjects, grouped based on clinical criteria to receive different combination anti-retroviral therapies (cARTs). These EEG sources were hypothesized to reflect beneficial effects of both regimes. METHODS: Eyes-closed resting state EEG data were collected in 19 (Group A) and 39 (Group B) naïve HIV subjects at baseline (i.e. pre-treatment; T0) and after 5months of cART (T5)...
September 9, 2016: Clinical Neurophysiology: Official Journal of the International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology
Jaime Galindo, Pedro Amariles, Héctor F Mueses-Marín, Jaime A Hincapié, Sebastián González-Avendaño, Ximena Galindo-Orrego
BACKGROUND: Generic drug policies are often associated with concerns about the quality and effectiveness of these products. Phase IV clinical trials may be a suitable design to assess the effectiveness and safety of generic drugs. The objective of this study was to describe the effectiveness and the safety of the generic abacavir/lamivudine and efavirenz in treatment-naïve HIV-infected patients. METHODS: A monocentric, nonrandomized, open-label, phase IV study in treatment naïve HIV-infected patients 18 years or older with indication to receive abacavir/lamivudine and efavirenz were recruited from a program that provides comprehensive outpatient consultation and continuing care...
October 3, 2016: BMC Infectious Diseases
Davy Vancampfort, James Mugisha, Simon Rosenbaum, Joseph Firth, Marc De Hert, Michel Probst, Brendon Stubbs
Cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF) is a modifiable risk factor for cardiovascular disease and premature mortality. CRF levels and moderators among people living with HIV (PLWH) are unknown. The aim of the current meta-analysis was to (1) determine mean CRF in PLWH and compare levels with age- and gender-matched healthy controls (HCs), (2) explore moderators of CRF, (3) and (4) explore moderators of CRF outcomes following physical activity (PA) interventions. Major electronic databases were searched systematically for articles reporting CRF expressed as maximum or peak oxygen uptake (ml/min/kg) in PLWH...
October 3, 2016: Preventive Medicine
Joseph C Mudd, Soumya Panigrahi, Benjamin Kyi, So Hee Moon, Maura M Manion, Souheil-Antoine Younes, Scott F Sieg, Nicholas T Funderburg, David A Zidar, Michael M Lederman, Michael L Freeman
Increases in inflammation, coagulation, and CD8 T cell numbers are associated with elevated cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk in antiretroviral therapy (ART)-treated HIV infection. Circulating memory CD8 T cells that express the vascular endothelium-homing receptor CX3CR1 (fractalkine receptor) are enriched in ART-treated HIV-infected subjects. Thrombin-activated receptor (PAR-1) expression is increased in ART-treated HIV-infected subjects and is particularly elevated on CX3CR1+ CD8 T cells, suggesting that these cells could interact with coagulation elements...
October 4, 2016: Journal of Infectious Diseases
Hanif Esmail, Tolu Oni, Friedrich Thienemann, Nashreen Omar-Davies, Robert J Wilkinson, Mpiko Ntsekhe
BACKGROUND: Cardiovascular disorders are common in HIV-1 infected persons in Africa and presentation is often insidious. Development of screening algorithms for cardiovascular disorders appropriate to a resource-constrained setting could facilitate timely referral. Cardiothoracic ratio (CTR) on chest radiograph (CXR) has been suggested as a potential screening tool but little is known about its reproducibility and stability. Our primary aim was to evaluate the stability and the inter-observer variability of CTR in HIV-1 infected outpatients...
2016: PloS One
Nina E Diana, Saraladevi Naicker
The prevalence of HIV-associated chronic kidney disease (CKD) varies geographically and depends on the definition of CKD used, ranging from 4.7% to 38% globally. The incidence, however, has decreased with the use of effective combined antiretroviral therapy (cART). A wide variety of histological patterns are seen in HIV-associated kidney diseases that include glomerular and tubulointerstitial pathology. In resource-rich settings, there has been a plateau in the incidence of end-stage renal disease secondary to HIV-associated nephropathy (HIVAN)...
2016: International Journal of Nephrology and Renovascular Disease
Justin M Cournoyer, Aven P Garms, Kimberly N Thiessen, Margaret T Bowers, Melissa D Johnson, Michael V Relf
HIV infection has progressed from an acute, terminal disease to a chronic illness with cardiovascular disease as the leading cause of death among persons living with HIV. As persons living with HIV infection continue to become older, traditional risk factors for atherosclerosis compounded by the pathophysiological effects of HIV infection and antiretroviral therapy markedly increase the risk for cardiovascular disease. Further, persons living with HIV are also at high risk for cardiomyopathy. Critical care nurses must recognize the risk factors for cardiovascular disease and the pathophysiology and complex treatment options in order to manage care of these patients and facilitate multidisciplinary collaboration...
October 2016: Critical Care Nurse
Stéphane Mouly, Célia Lloret-Linares, Pierre-Olivier Sellier, Damien Sene, J-F Bergmann
An interaction of drug with food, herbs, and dietary supplements is usually the consequence of a physical, chemical or physiologic relationship between a drug and a product consumed as food, nutritional supplement or over-the-counter medicinal plant. The current educational review aims at reminding to the prescribing physicians that the most clinically relevant drug-food interactions may not be strictly limited to those with grapefruit juice and with the Saint John's Wort herbal extract and may be responsible for changes in drug plasma concentrations, which in turn decrease efficacy or led to sometimes life-threatening toxicity...
September 28, 2016: Pharmacological Research: the Official Journal of the Italian Pharmacological Society
Katherine W Kooij, Ferdinand W N M Wit, Thijs Booiman, Marc van der Valk, Maarten F Schim van der Loeff, Neeltje A Kootstra, Peter Reiss
Smoking may affect cardiovascular disease risk more strongly in HIV-infected compared to HIV-uninfected individuals. We hypothesized that an interaction at the level of the immune system may contribute to this increased risk. We assessed soluble markers of inflammation (high-sensitivity C-reactive protein [hsCRP]), immune activation (soluble [s]CD14 and sCD163) and coagulation (D-dimer) in HIV-infected and uninfected never, former and current smokers. Smoking was independently associated with higher hsCRP levels and lower sCD163 levels, and at borderline significance with higher sCD14 and D-dimer levels; we found no evidence of a differential effect of smoking in HIV-infected compared to uninfected individuals...
September 28, 2016: Journal of Infectious Diseases
Fetch more papers »
Fetching more papers... Fetching...
Read by QxMD. Sign in or create an account to discover new knowledge that matter to you.
Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"