keyword
MENU ▼
Read by QxMD icon Read
search

Brain disorders

keyword
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29334322/plasma-brain-derived-neurotrophic-factor-pbdnf-and-executive-dysfunctions-in-patients-with-major-depressive-disorder
#1
Stefanie Wagner, Sarah Kayser, Jan Engelmann, Konrad F Schlicht, Nadine Dreimüller, Oliver Tüscher, Florian Müller-Dahlhaus, Dieter F Braus, André Tadić, Alexandra Neyazi, Helge Frieling, Klaus Lieb
OBJECTIVES: Executive dysfunctions are frequently seen in patients with Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) and normalize in many cases during effective antidepressant therapy. This study investigated whether a normalization of executive dysfunctions during antidepressant treatment correlates with or can be predicted by clinical parameters or levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). METHODS: In 110 MDD patients with executive dysfunctions (percentile < 16), executive functions and plasma BDNF levels were analysed at baseline, day 14 and 56 of an antidepressant treatment...
January 15, 2018: World Journal of Biological Psychiatry
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29333482/flexibility-in-the-face-of-fear-hippocampal-prefrontal-regulation-of-fear-and-avoidance
#2
Justin M Moscarello, Stephen Maren
Generating appropriate defensive behaviors in the face of threat is essential to survival. Although many of these behaviors are 'hard-wired', they are also flexible. For example, Pavlovian fear conditioning generates learned defensive responses, such as conditioned freezing, that can be suppressed through extinction. The expression of extinguished responses is highly context-dependent, allowing animals to engage behavioral responses appropriate to the contexts in which threats are encountered. Likewise, animals and humans will avoid noxious outcomes if given the opportunity...
February 2018: Current Opinion in Behavioral Sciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29333343/resounding-failure-to-replicate-links-between-developmental-language-disorder-and-cerebral-lateralisation
#3
Alexander C Wilson, Dorothy V M Bishop
Background: It has been suggested that failure to establish cerebral lateralisation may be related to developmental language disorder (DLD). There has been weak support for any link with handedness, but more consistent reports of associations with functional brain lateralisation for language. The consistency of lateralisation across different functions may also be important. We aimed to replicate previous findings of an association between DLD and reduced laterality on a quantitative measure of hand preference (reaching across the midline) and on language laterality assessed using functional transcranial Doppler ultrasound (fTCD)...
2018: PeerJ
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29332257/kynurenic-acid-and-its-derivatives-are-able-to-modulate-the-adhesion-and-locomotion-of-brain-endothelial-cells
#4
Eszter Lajkó, Bernadett Tuka, Ferenc Fülöp, István Krizbai, József Toldi, Kálmán Magyar, László Vécsei, László Kőhidai
The neuroprotective actions of kynurenic acid (KYNA) and its derivatives in several neurodegenerative disorders [characterized by damage to the cerebral endothelium and to the blood-brain barrier (BBB)] are well established. Cell-extracellular matrix (ECM) adhesion is supposedly involved in recovery of impaired cerebral endothelium integrity (endothelial repair). The present work aimed to investigate the effects of KYNA and its synthetic derivatives on cellular behaviour (e.g. adhesion and locomotion) and on morphology of the GP8 rat brain endothelial cell line, modeling the BBB endothelium...
January 13, 2018: Journal of Neural Transmission
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29332095/both-serum-brain-derived-neurotrophic-factor-and-interleukin-6-levels-are-not-associated-with-therapeutic-response-to-lamotrigine-augmentation-therapy-in-treatment-resistant-depressive-disorder
#5
Shoko Kagawa, Kazuo Mihara, Takeshi Suzuki, Goyo Nagai, Akifumi Nakamura, Kenji Nemoto, Tsuyoshi Kondo
BACKGROUND/AIMS: Serum levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) were prospectively monitored in relation with therapeutic response to lamotrigine augmentation therapy in 46 (15 males and 31 females) inpatients with treatment-resistant depressive disorder during an 8-week treatment with lamotrigine using an open-study design. METHODS: The subjects were 46 depressed patients who had already shown insufficient response to at least 3 psychotropics including antidepressants, mood stabilizers, and atypical antipsychotics...
January 12, 2018: Neuropsychobiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29332092/early-life-stress-activates-glial-cells-in-the-hippocampus-but-attenuates-cytokine-secretion-in-response-to-an-immune-challenge-in-rat-pups
#6
Luis Miguel Saavedra, Bertha Fenton Navarro, Luz Torner
OBJECTIVE: Early life stress (ELS) increases the vulnerability to developing psychopathological disorders in adulthood that are accompanied by brain inflammatory processes. However, it is not known how a combined double hit (stress and immune) at an early age affects the response of the neuroimmune system. Here we investigated the effect of periodic maternal separation (MS) followed by administration of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) on glial cells in the CA3 region and hilus of the hippocampus and on cytokine release on postnatal day (PN) 15...
January 13, 2018: Neuroimmunomodulation
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29332089/gene-therapy-for-parkinson-s-disease
#7
Vivek Sudhakar, R Mark Richardson
Gene therapy is a clinical tool that may eventually provide therapeutic benefit to patients suffering from movement disorders through a few potential mechanisms: direct correction of the pathogenic mechanism, neuroprotection, neurorestoration or symptom control. The therapeutic mechanism is therefore dependent on knowledge of disease pathogenesis and the required temporal and spatial specificities of gene expression. An additional critical challenge is achieving the most complete transduction of the target structure while avoiding leakage into neighboring regions or perivascular spaces...
2018: Progress in Neurological Surgery
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29332088/drug-delivery-for-movement-disorders
#8
Neil Barua, Steven Gill
There has been substantial research interest in delivering therapeutic neurotrophic factors directly to the brain for the treatment of Parkinson's Disease (PD) and other movement disorders. Direct infusion of glial cell-line derived neurotrophic factor has been investigated in both pre-clinical models and clinical trials. In this chapter we discuss past and present research investigating the potential of direct drug delivery to the brain for the treatment of PD and other movement disorders.
2018: Progress in Neurological Surgery
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29332087/adaptive-brain-stimulation-for-movement-disorders
#9
Martijn Beudel, Hayriye Cagnan, Simon Little
Deep brain stimulation (DBS) has markedly changed how we treat movement disorders including Parkinson's disease (PD), dystonia, and essential tremor (ET). However, despite its demonstrable clinical benefit, DBS is often limited by side effects and partial efficacy. These limitations may be due in part to the fact that DBS interferes with both pathological and physiological neural activities. DBS could, therefore, be potentially improved were it applied selectively and only at times of enhanced pathological activity...
2018: Progress in Neurological Surgery
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29332086/current-and-expected-advances-in-deep-brain-stimulation-for-movement-disorders
#10
Ausaf A Bari, Jasmine Thum, Diana Babayan, Andres M Lozano
Deep brain stimulation (DBS) has become an established treatment for medically refractory movement disorders including Parkinson's disease, essential tremor, and dystonia. The field of DBS continues to evolve with advances in patient selection, target identification, electrode and pulse generator technology, and the development of more effective stimulation paradigms such as closed-loop stimulation. Furthermore, as the safety and efficacy of DBS improves through better hardware design and deeper understanding of its mechanisms of action, the indications for DBS will continue to expand to cover a wider range of disorders...
2018: Progress in Neurological Surgery
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29332085/deep-brain-stimulation-of-the-subthalamic-nucleus-and-globus-pallidus-for-parkinson-s-disease
#11
Philip S Lee, Donald J Crammond, R Mark Richardson
The concept of deep brain stimulation (DBS) for Parkinson's disease (PD) was introduced over 20 years ago, but our understanding of the nuances of this procedure continues to improve. The average motor outcomes of internal segment of the globus pallidus (GPi) and subthalamic nucleus (STN) DBS appear to be similar, although GPi DBS may allow greater recovery of verbal fluency and may provide greater relief of depression symptoms and improvement in the quality of life, and STN DBS appears more likely to result in decrease in levodopa equivalent doses...
2018: Progress in Neurological Surgery
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29332084/thalamic-deep-brain-stimulation
#12
Benjamin B Whiting, Alexander C Whiting, Donald M Whiting
The use of deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the thalamus has been proven to be a safe and efficacious treatment for the management of many diseases. The most common indication for thalamic DBS remains essential tremor (ET), one of the most common movement disorders in the world. ET patients should be considered for surgical intervention when their tremor has demonstrated to be refractory to medication, a characteristic estimated to be present in roughly 50% of ET cases. Advantages of DBS over thalamotomy include its reversibility, the ability to adjust stimulation settings to optimize efficacy and minimize side effects, the ability to perform bilateral procedures safely, and an association with a lower risk of postoperative cognitive problems...
2018: Progress in Neurological Surgery
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29332079/radiosurgical-thalamotomy
#13
Edward A Monaco Iii, Samuel S Shin, Ajay Niranjan, L Dade Lunsford
Tremor is a common movement disorder that can be disabling, and its initial treatment is in the form of medical therapies. Often patients are refractory and seek surgical intervention. Treatment options for these patients include surgical radiofrequency thalamotomy and deep brain stimulation. There are a subset of patients who, for various reasons, are not candidates for open surgical procedures, or who opt to avoid them. For these patients, radiosurgical thalamotomy is a safe and useful alternative. Herein, we provide a review of the use of radiosurgical thalamotomy for the treatment of medically refractory tremor by discussing its history, defining the technique and its indications, evaluating its efficacy, and exploring its complications and shortcomings...
2018: Progress in Neurological Surgery
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29332078/magnetic-resonance-guided-high-intensity-focused-ultrasound-for-treating-movement-disorders
#14
Young Goo Kim, Eun Jung Kweon, Won Seok Chang, Hyun Ho Jung, Jin Woo Chang
Transcranial magnetic resonance-guided focused ultrasound (MRgFUS) surgery has recently gained favor as a novel, noninvasive alternative to conventional neurosurgery. In contrast to traditional ablative interventions, transcranial MRgFUS surgery is entirely imaging-guided and uses continuous temperature measurements at the target and surrounding tissue taken in real-time. Unlike Gamma Knife radiosurgery, MRgFUS surgery can make a lesion immediately and does not use ionizing radiation. Moreover, since no metallic device is implanted, MR imaging-based diagnosis is not restricted throughout life...
2018: Progress in Neurological Surgery
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29332077/stereotactic-radiofrequency-lesioning-for-movement-disorders
#15
Takaomi Taira, Shiro Horisawa, Nobuhiko Takeda, Prajakta Ghate
During the past 2 decades, deep brain stimulation (DBS) took over the position of radiofrequency (RF) lesioning of thalamic or pallidal targets for control of movement disorders. Superiority of DBS over RF lesioning is widely accepted, and most neurosurgeons even regard RF lesioning to be old-fashioned and dangerous. Such concepts emerged from the data of old stereotactic operations with ventriculography and without computerized planning. Hardware-related complications are not negligible in long-term DBS therapy, and DBS only controls the symptoms...
2018: Progress in Neurological Surgery
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29332076/image-guided-asleep-deep-brain-stimulation
#16
Andrew L Ko, Kim J Burchiel
Deep brain stimulation (DBS) has become an established treatment for medically refractory movement disorders including Parkinson's disease, essential tremor, and dystonia. The field of DBS continues to evolve with advances in patient selection, target identification, electrode and pulse generator technology, and the development of more effective stimulation paradigms such as closed-loop stimulation. Furthermore, as the safety and efficacy of DBS improves through better hardware design and deeper understanding of its mechanisms of action, the indications for DBS will continue to expand to cover a wider range of disorders...
2018: Progress in Neurological Surgery
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29332075/patient-evaluation-and-selection-for-movement-disorders-surgery-the-changing-spectrum-of-indications
#17
Steffen Paschen, Günther Deuschl
This report summarizes the state-of-the-art and controversies around patient selection for deep brain stimulation (DBS) for various conditions. Parkinson's disease (PD): several class I studies have shown superiority of DBS over best medical treatment for advanced PD with fluctuations and further inclusion criteria. One class I study suggests that PD patients with early motor complications might gain more quality of life if operated within 3 years after the onset of fluctuations. The subthalamic nucleus (STN) is still the standard target...
2018: Progress in Neurological Surgery
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29332070/pathophysiologic-basis-of-movement-disorders
#18
Thomas Wichmann
Movement disorders are common and functionally disabling neurologic diseases. Studies over the last decades have investigated the pathophysiology of these diseases in considerable detail, leading to significant insights into their generation of motor disability. While genetically and clinically heterogeneous, most of them are accompanied by prominent and characteristic changes in firing rates and patterns in the basal ganglia, thalamus, and cortex. In recent years, researchers have placed increasing emphasis on the importance of oscillatory changes in firing in these structures, and have discovered that brain areas that were previously considered to be remote from the basal ganglia (such as the cerebellum and the pedunculopontine nucleus) are also highly significant in these disorders...
2018: Progress in Neurological Surgery
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29332069/the-history-of-movement-disorder-brain-surgery
#19
L Dade Lunsford, Ajay Niranjan
The first surgical procedures for abnormal movement disorders began in the 1930s, when surgeons first proposed ablative techniques of the caudate nucleus or transection of motor (pyramidal) pathways to reduce involuntary movements in patients with Parkinson's related tremor. During the 50-year interval between 1945 and 1995, the development of precise intracranial guiding devices, brain maps, and advanced imaging led to the refinement of appropriate deep brain targets affecting extrapyramidal pathways. Lesional surgery and subsequent neuroaugmentation using deep brain stimulation extended the role of deep brain surgery for a wider group of patients with tremor, rigidity, dyskinesia, and other involuntary movement disorders...
2018: Progress in Neurological Surgery
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29332042/protective-effects-of-indian-spice-curcumin-against-amyloid-%C3%AE-in-alzheimer-s-disease
#20
P Hemachandra Reddy, Maria Manczak, Xiangling Yin, Mary Catherine Grady, Andrew Mitchell, Sahil Tonk, Chandra Sekhar Kuruva, Jasvinder Singh Bhatti, Ramesh Kandimalla, Murali Vijayan, Subodh Kumar, Rui Wang, Jangampalli Adi Pradeepkiran, Gilbert Ogunmokun, Kavya Thamarai, Kandi Quesada, Annette Boles, Arubala P Reddy
The purpose of our article is to assess the current understanding of Indian spice, curcumin, against amyloid-β (Aβ)-induced toxicity in Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathogenesis. Natural products, such as ginger, curcumin, and gingko biloba have been used as diets and dietary supplements to treat human diseases, including cancer, cardiovascular, respiratory, infectious, diabetes, obesity, metabolic syndromes, and neurological disorders. Products derived from plants are known to have protective effects, including anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, anti-arthritis, pro-healing, and boosting memory cognitive functions...
2018: Journal of Alzheimer's Disease: JAD
keyword
keyword
60553
1
2
Fetch more papers »
Fetching more papers... Fetching...
Read by QxMD. Sign in or create an account to discover new knowledge that matter to you.
Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read
×

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"