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T Jean M Arseneau-Robar, Eliane Müller, Anouk L Taucher, Carel P van Schaik, Erik P Willems
Males in a number of group-living species fight in intergroup conflicts to defend access to food resources, a seemingly paradoxical behaviour, given that this resource does not usually limit male fitness directly. We investigated the mechanism(s) driving apparent male food defence in wild vervet monkeys (Chlorocebus aethiops pygerythrus) by testing the effect that female resource access, and female audience size and activity had on the response of focal males during simulated intergroup encounters. Males do not appear to defend food to increase the reproductive success of female group members because their response was not influenced by the presence of provisioning boxes that only females could access...
October 24, 2016: Scientific Reports
Alberto Cacciola, Demetrio Milardi, Alessandro Calamuneri, Lilla Bonanno, Silvia Marino, Pietro Ciolli, Margherita Russo, Daniele Bruschetta, Antonio Duca, Fabio Trimarchi, Angelo Quartarone, Giuseppe Anastasi
According to the classical view, the cerebellum has long been confined to motor control physiology; however, it has now become evident that it exerts several non-somatic features other than the coordination of movement and is engaged also in the regulation of cognition and emotion. In a previous diffusion-weighted imaging-constrained spherical deconvolution (CSD) tractography study, we demonstrated the existence of a direct cerebellum-hippocampal pathway, thus reinforcing the hypothesis of the cerebellar role in non-motor domains...
October 24, 2016: Cerebellum
Steve Ahuka-Mundeke, Octavie Lunguya-Metila, Valentin Mbenzo-Abokome, Christelle Butel, Bila-Isia Inogwabini, Valentin Omasombo, Jean-Jacques Muyembe-Tamfum, Alexander V Georgiev, Martin N Muller, Jean-Bosco N Ndjango, Yingying Li, Eric Delaporte, Beatrice H Hahn, Martine Peeters, Ahidjo Ayouba
There are currently four known primate T-cell lymphotropic virus groups (PTLV1-4), each of which comprises closely related simian (STLV) and human (HTLV) viruses. For PTLV-1 and PTLV-3, simian and human viruses are interspersed, suggesting multiple cross-species transmission events; however, for PTLV-2 this is not so clear because HTLV-2 and STLV-2 strains from captive bonobos (Pan paniscus) form two distinct clades. To determine to what extent bonobos are naturally infected with STLV, we screened fecal samples (n = 633) from wild-living bonobos (n = 312) at six different sites in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) for the presence of STLV nucleic acids...
January 2016: Virus Evolution
Hyun-Je Kim, Nari Byun, Ohsang Kwon, Chung-Gyu Park
The number of patients in need of organ transplantation is continuously on the rise. However, because of organ donor shortage, xenotransplantation has been highlighted as an alternative. Among the various porcine organs and tissues, porcine islets are considered to be the best-matching implantable candidates for clinical application based on recent progress in nonhuman primate pre-clinical studies. Nevertheless, before initiation of clinical trials, it should be confirmed whether the requisite xeno-antigen sensitization would have a deleterious effect on subsequent allo-transplantation or vice versa...
October 20, 2016: Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications
Julia Fischer, Tabitha Price
Two core questions in the study of speech evolution are whether nonhuman primate signals should be conceived as referential, and what the role of social cognition is in primate communication. Current evidence suggests that the structure of primate vocalizations is largely innate and related to the affective/motivational state of the caller, with a probabilistic and underdetermined relationship between specific events and calls. Moreover, nonhuman primates do not appear to express or comprehend communicative or informative intent, which is in line with a lack of mental state attribution to others...
October 20, 2016: Neuroscience and Biobehavioral Reviews
Rafaela S C Takeshita, Michael A Huffman, Keiko Mouri, Keiko Shimizu, Fred B Bercovitch
Dehydroepiandrosterone-sulfate (DHEAS) is the main steroid product of the primate fetal adrenal during mid to late gestation and it plays a major role in providing estrogens needed for parturition. We tested the hypothesis that this hormone can indicate fetal health status and attempted to use fecal DHEAS (fDHEAS) to predict pregnancy outcome in Japanese macaques. The subjects were 16 adult females and 3 neonatal Japanese macaques living in captivity at the Primate Research Institute, Kyoto University. We classified females that gave birth to healthy infants as successful and females that gave birth to dead infants as stillbirth (late fetal loss) and miscarriage (early fetal loss)...
October 19, 2016: Animal Reproduction Science
Francesca Rocchi, Margit E Dylla, Peter A Bohlen, Ramnarayan Ramachandran
Detection thresholds for auditory stimuli (signals) increase in the presence of maskers. Natural environments contain maskers/distractors that can have a wide range of spatiotemporal properties relative to the signal. While these parameters have been well explored psychophysically in humans, they have not been well explored in animal models, and their neuronal underpinnings are not well understood. As a precursor to the neuronal measurements, we report the effects of systematically varying the spatial and temporal relationship between signals and noise in macaque monkeys (Macaca mulatta and Macaca radiata)...
October 19, 2016: Hearing Research
Gerald J Pepe, Adina Maniu, Graham Aberdeen, Terrie J Lynch, Soon Ok Kim, Jerry Nadler, Eugene D Albrecht
We recently demonstrated that offspring delivered to baboons deprived of estrogen during the second half of gestation exhibited insulin resistance prior to onset of puberty. Because gonadal hormones have a profound effect on insulin action and secretion in adults, we determined whether insulin resistance is retained after initiation of gonadal secretion of testosterone and estradiol. Glucose tolerance tests were performed in postpubertal baboon offspring of untreated and letrozole-treated animals (serum estradiol reduced >95 %)...
October 21, 2016: Endocrine
Omar Navarro Leija, Sanju Varghese, Mira V Han
Evolutionary constraint for insertions and deletions (indels) is not necessarily equal to constraint for nucleotide substitutions for any given region of a genome. Knowing the variation in indel-specific evolutionary rates across the sequence will aid our understanding of evolutionary constraints on indels, and help us infer how indels have contributed to the evolution of the sequence. However, unlike for nucleotide substitutions, there has been no phylogenetic method that can statistically infer significantly different rates of indels across the sequence space independent of substitution rates...
October 21, 2016: Journal of Molecular Evolution
Pengfei Fan, Yang Liu, Zhechun Zhang, Chao Zhao, Cheng Li, Wulin Liu, Zhijin Liu, Ming Li
The white-cheeked macaque Macaca leucogenys is a recently described species that was only diagnosed based on photos, without any specimen measurements or molecular genetic diagnosis. Using extracted DNA from four newly collected skin specimens, we studied the genetic diversity and phylogenetic position of M. leucogenys using multilocus sequence data, including mitochondrial and Y chromosomal genes. Skin measurements of four individuals showed that the white-cheeked macaque is robust and larger than M. assamensis but is similar in body size to M...
October 18, 2016: Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution
Alema Galijatovic-Idrizbegovic, Judith E Miller, Wendy D Cornell, James A Butler, Gordon K Wollenberg, Frank D Sistare, Joseph J DeGeorge
Chronic (>3 months) preclinical toxicology studies are conducted to support the safe conduct of clinical trials exceeding 3 months in duration. We have conducted a review of 32 chronic toxicology studies in non-rodents (22 studies in dogs and 10 in non-human primates) and 27 chronic toxicology studies in rats dosed with Merck compounds to determine the frequency at which additional target organ toxicities are observed in chronic toxicology studies as compared to subchronic studies of 3 months in duration...
October 18, 2016: Regulatory Toxicology and Pharmacology: RTP
Iulia Bădescu, M Anne Katzenberg, David P Watts, Daniel W Sellen
OBJECTIVES: Determining nutritional development in wild primates is difficult through observations because confirming dietary intake is challenging. Physiological measures are needed to determine the relative contributions of maternal milk and other foods at different ages, and time of weaning. We used fecal stable carbon and nitrogen isotopes (δ(13) C, δ(15) N) and fecal nitrogen concentrations (%N) from wild chimpanzees at Ngogo, Uganda, to derive physiological dietary indicators during the transition from total reliance on maternal milk to adult foods after weaning...
October 21, 2016: American Journal of Physical Anthropology
Nicole Mons, Daniel Beracochea
A prime mechanism that contributes to the development and maintenance of alcoholism is the dysregulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis activity and the release of glucocorticoids (cortisol in humans and primates, corticosterone in rodents) from the adrenal glands. In the brain, sustained, local elevation of glucocorticoid concentration even long after cessation of chronic alcohol consumption compromises functional integrity of a circuit, including the prefrontal cortex (PFC), the hippocampus (HPC), and the amygdala (AMG)...
2016: Frontiers in Psychiatry
Bernhard Reuss, Abdul R Asif, Abdullah Almamy, Christian Schwerk, Horst Schroten, Hiroshi Ishikawa, Charis Drummer, Rüdiger Behr
Prenatal maternal infections with Neisseria gonorrhoeae (NG) correlate with an increased lifetime probability for the offspring to develop psychosis. We could previously demonstrate that in human choroid plexus papilloma cells, anti-NG antibodies (α-NG) bind to mitochondrial proteins HSP60 and ATPB, and interfere with cellular energy metabolism. To assess the in vivo relevance for this, especially during prenatal neural development, we investigated here interactions of NG-specific antisera (α-NG1, α-NG2) with brain, choroid plexus and other non-neural tissues in pre- and perinatal samples of the nonhuman primate (NHP) Callithrix jacchus (CJ), a NHP model for preclinical research...
October 17, 2016: Brain Research
Sandra A Heldstab, Carel P van Schaik, Karin Isler
Humans stand out among non-aquatic mammals by having both an extremely large brain and a relatively large amount of body fat. To understand the evolution of this human peculiarity we report a phylogenetic comparative study of 120 mammalian species, including 30 primates, using seasonal variation in adult body mass as a proxy of the tendency to store fat. Species that rely on storing fat to survive lean periods are expected to be less active because of higher costs of locomotion and have increased predation risk due to reduced agility...
November 2016: Journal of Human Evolution
Bin Shen, Yu Zhang, Wei Dai, Yupo Ma, Yongping Jiang
BACKGROUND: Hematopoietic CD34(+) stem cells are widely used in the clinical therapy of complicated blood diseases. Stem cell factor Sall4B is a zinc finger transcription factor that plays a vital role in hematopoietic stem cell expansion. The purpose of our current study is to further evaluate how Sall4B might affect the expansion of CD34(+) cells derived from nonhuman primates. METHODS: Sall4B was overexpressed in nonhuman primate bone marrow-derived CD34(+) cells via a lentiviral transduction system...
October 20, 2016: Stem Cell Research & Therapy
Sutas Suttiprapa, Gabriel Rinaldi, Isheng J Tsai, Victoria H Mann, Larisa Dubrovsky, Hong-Bin Yan, Nancy Holroyd, Thomas Huckvale, Caroline Durrant, Anna V Protasio, Tatiana Pushkarsky, Sergey Iordanskiy, Matthew Berriman, Michael I Bukrinsky, Paul J Brindley
Schistosomiasis is the most important helminthic disease of humanity in terms of morbidity and mortality. Facile manipulation of schistosomes using lentiviruses would enable advances in functional genomics in these and related neglected tropical diseases pathogens including tapeworms, and including their non-dividing cells. Such approaches have hitherto been unavailable. Blood stream forms of the human blood fluke, Schistosoma mansoni, the causative agent of the hepatointestinal schistosomiasis, were infected with the human HIV-1 isolate NL4-3 pseudotyped with vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein...
October 2016: PLoS Pathogens
Hudson Alves Pinto, Vitor Luis Tenà Rio Mati, Diego Florencio Pujoni, Alan Lane de Melo
The trematodes belonging to the genus Platynosomum are biliary parasites of birds and mammals (domestic and wildlife) in tropical and subtropical areas of the globe. Despite several reports on platynosomosis in captive nonhuman primates, mainly in South America, the taxonomy of species of Platynosomum that infect these hosts remains confused, and it is not clear whether the species found in cats is the same that infects nonhuman primates. Because a detailed morphological study of Platynosomum from nonhuman primates is lacking, in this study we analyzed specimens of Platynosomum recovered from the biliary system of Callithrix penicillata kept in captivity in an animal facility...
October 20, 2016: Journal of Parasitology
Joanna Malukiewicz, Crystal M Hepp, Katerina Guschanski, Anne C Stone
OBJECTIVES: Two subgroups make up the marmoset genus Callithrix. The "aurita" group is composed of two species, whereas evolutionary relationships among the four species of the "jacchus" group remain unclear. To uncover these relationships, we first sequenced mitochondrial genomes for C. kuhlii and C. penicillata to complement data available for congeners. We then constructed a phylogenetic tree based on mtDNA heavy chain protein coding genes from several primates to untangle species relationships and estimate divergence times of the jacchus group...
October 20, 2016: American Journal of Physical Anthropology
Jennifer E Adair, Timothy Waters, Kevin G Haworth, Sara P Kubek, Grant D Trobridge, Jonah D Hocum, Shelly Heimfeld, Hans-Peter Kiem
Haematopoietic stem cell (HSC) gene therapy has demonstrated potential to treat many diseases. However, current state of the art requires sophisticated ex vivo gene transfer in a dedicated Good Manufacturing Practices facility, limiting availability. An automated process would improve the availability and standardized manufacture of HSC gene therapy. Here, we develop a novel program for semi-automated cell isolation and culture equipment to permit complete benchtop generation of gene-modified CD34(+) blood cell products for transplantation...
October 20, 2016: Nature Communications
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