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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28431195/feeding-behavior-and-activity-budget-of-the-southern-yellow-cheeked-crested-gibbons-nomascus-gabriellae-in-a-lowland-tropical-forest
#1
Thanh H Bach, Jin Chen, Minh D Hoang, Kingsly C Beng, Van T Nguyen
The southern yellow-cheeked crested gibbon (Nomascus gabriellae), an endangered species native to Vietnam and Cambodia, lives exclusively in undisturbed tropical forests and depends primarily on ripe fruit for food. Although this species is highly threatened, its ecology and conservation status remain relatively unknown. In order to understand how this heavily frugivorous primate adapts to the seasonal fluctuation of fruit resources in the forest, we collected feeding behavior and ranging activity data on one group of southern yellow-cheeked crested gibbons in Cat Tien National Park, Vietnam, over 1-year period...
April 21, 2017: American Journal of Primatology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28427115/personality-assessment-and-model-comparison-with-behavioral-data-a-statistical-framework-and-empirical-demonstration-with-bonobos-pan-paniscus
#2
Jordan S Martin, Scott A Suarez
Interest in quantifying consistent among-individual variation in primate behavior, also known as personality, has grown rapidly in recent decades. Although behavioral coding is the most frequently utilized method for assessing primate personality, limitations in current statistical practice prevent researchers' from utilizing the full potential of their coding datasets. These limitations include the use of extensive data aggregation, not modeling biologically relevant sources of individual variance during repeatability estimation, not partitioning between-individual (co)variance prior to modeling personality structure, the misuse of principal component analysis, and an over-reliance upon exploratory statistical techniques to compare personality models across populations, species, and data collection methods...
April 20, 2017: American Journal of Primatology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28426971/metaplasticity-as-a-neural-substrate-for-adaptive-learning-and-choice-under-uncertainty
#3
Shiva Farashahi, Christopher H Donahue, Peyman Khorsand, Hyojung Seo, Daeyeol Lee, Alireza Soltani
Value-based decision making often involves integration of reward outcomes over time, but this becomes considerably more challenging if reward assignments on alternative options are probabilistic and non-stationary. Despite the existence of various models for optimally integrating reward under uncertainty, the underlying neural mechanisms are still unknown. Here we propose that reward-dependent metaplasticity (RDMP) can provide a plausible mechanism for both integration of reward under uncertainty and estimation of uncertainty itself...
April 19, 2017: Neuron
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28425496/3-4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine-increases-affiliative-behaviors-in-squirrel-monkeys-in-a-serotonin-2a-receptor-dependent-manner
#4
Elizabeth G Pitts, Adelaide R Minerva, Erika B Oliver, Jordan N Kohn, Meghan T Logun, Agnieszka Sulima, Kenner C Rice, Leonard L Howell
3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) increases sociality in humans and animals. Release of serotonin (5-HT) is thought to play an important role in the increase in social behaviors, but the mechanisms underlying these effects are poorly understood. Despite the advantages of nonhuman primate models, no studies have examined the mechanisms of the social effects of MDMA in nonhuman primates. The behavior and vocalizations of four group-housed squirrel monkeys were examined following administration of MDMA, its enantiomers, and methamphetamine...
April 20, 2017: Neuropsychopharmacology: Official Publication of the American College of Neuropsychopharmacology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28424576/defensive-vocalizations-and-motor-asymmetry-triggered-by-disinhibition-of-the-periaqueductal-gray-in-non-human-primates
#5
Patrick A Forcelli, Hannah F Waguespack, Ludise Malkova
Rapid and reflexive responses to threats are present across phylogeny. The neural circuitry mediating reflexive defense reactions has been well-characterized in a variety of species, for example, in rodents and cats, the detection of and species-typical response to threats is mediated by a network of structures including the midbrain tectum (deep and intermediate layers of the superior colliculus [DLSC]), periaqueductal gray (PAG), and forebrain structures such as the amygdala and hypothalamus. However, relatively little is known about the functional architecture of defense circuitry in primates...
2017: Frontiers in Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28422948/beyond-the-uterine-environment-nonhuman-primate-model-to-investigate-maternal-fetal-and-neonatal-outcomes-following-chronic-intrauterine-infection
#6
Meredith A Kelleher, Zheng Liu, Xiaojie Wang, Christopher D Kroenke, Lisa A Houser, Brandy L Dozier, Lauren D Martin, Ken B Waites, Cindy McEvoy, Robert L Schelonka, Peta L Grigsby
BACKGROUND: Intrauterine infection is a significant cause of early preterm birth. We have developed a fetal-neonatal model in the rhesus macaque to determine the impact of chronic intrauterine infection with Ureaplasma parvum on early neonatal reflexes and brain development. METHODS: Time-mated, pregnant rhesus macaques were randomized to be inoculated with U. parvum (serovar 1; 10(5)cfu) or control media at ~120 dGA. Neonates were delivered by elective hysterotomy at 135-147 dGA (term=167d) stabilized and cared for in our nonhuman primate neonatal intensive care unit...
April 19, 2017: Pediatric Research
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28421673/endothelial-erbb4-deficit-induces-alterations-in-exploratory-behavior-and-brain-energy-metabolism-in-mice
#7
Gang Wu, Xiu-Xiu Liu, Nan-Nan Lu, Qi-Bing Liu, Yun Tian, Wei-Feng Ye, Guo-Jun Jiang, Rong-Rong Tao, Feng Han, Ying-Mei Lu
AIMS: The receptor tyrosine kinase ErbB4 is present throughout the primate brain and has a distinct functional profile. In this study, we investigate the potential role of endothelial ErbB4 receptor signaling in the brain. RESULTS: Here, we show that the endothelial cell-specific deletion of ErbB4 induces decreased exploratory behavior in adult mice. However, the water maze task for spatial memory and the memory reconsolidation test reveal no changes; additionally, we observe no impairment in CaMKII phosphorylation in Cdh5Cre;ErbB4(f/f) mice, which indicates that the endothelial ErbB4 deficit leads to decreased exploratory activity rather than direct memory deficits...
April 18, 2017: CNS Neuroscience & Therapeutics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28420336/reduced-changes-in-protein-compared-to-mrna-levels-across-non-proliferating-tissues
#8
Kobi Perl, Kathy Ushakov, Yair Pozniak, Ofer Yizhar-Barnea, Yoni Bhonker, Shaked Shivatzki, Tamar Geiger, Karen B Avraham, Ron Shamir
BACKGROUND: The quantitative relations between RNA and protein are fundamental to biology and are still not fully understood. Across taxa, it was demonstrated that the protein-to-mRNA ratio in steady state varies in a direction that lessens the change in protein levels as a result of changes in the transcript abundance. Evidence for this behavior in tissues is sparse. We tested this phenomenon in new data that we produced for the mouse auditory system, and in previously published tissue datasets...
April 18, 2017: BMC Genomics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28419550/urban-primate-ranging-patterns-gps-collar-deployments-for-macaca-fascicularis-and-m-sylvanus
#9
Amy R Klegarth, Hope Hollocher, Lisa Jones-Engel, Eric Shaw, Benjamin P Y-H Lee, Tessa Feeney, Damian Holmes, Dale Laguea, Agustín Fuentes
The global increase in urbanization is leading to heavier interface between humans and wildlife. Within these anthropogenic landscapes, little is known about ranging patterns, particularly with regard to urban primates. Here we present the results of the first long-term deployment of multiple GPS collars on two species of macaques to investigate the impacts of urbanization on urban primate ranging patterns in Singapore and Gibraltar. Collars data acquisition were excellent with respect to the amount, quality, and accuracy of data collected; however, remote connectivity and drop-off functionality was poor across all deployments...
May 2017: American Journal of Primatology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28413825/color-change-detection-activity-in-the-primate-superior-colliculus
#10
James P Herman, Richard J Krauzlis
The primate superior colliculus (SC) is a midbrain structure that participates in the control of spatial attention. Previous studies examining the role of the SC in attention have mostly used luminance-based visual features (e.g., motion, contrast) as the stimuli and saccadic eye movements as the behavioral response, both of which are known to modulate the activity of SC neurons. To explore the limits of the SC's involvement in the control of spatial attention, we recorded SC neuronal activity during a task using color, a visual feature dimension not traditionally associated with the SC, and required monkeys to detect threshold-level changes in the saturation of a cued stimulus by releasing a joystick during maintained fixation...
March 2017: ENeuro
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28411272/disconnection-of-the-perirhinal-and-postrhinal-cortices-impairs-recognition-of-objects-in-context-but-not-contextual-fear-conditioning
#11
Victoria R Heimer-McGinn, D L Poeta, K Aghi, M Udawatta, R D Burwell
The perirhinal cortex (PER) is known to process object information, whereas the rodent postrhinal cortex (POR), homolog to the parahippocampal cortex (PHC) in primates, is thought to process spatial information. A number of studies, however, provide evidence that both areas are involved in processing contextual information. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that the rat POR relies on object information received from the PER to form complex representations of context. Using three fear conditioning paradigms (signaled, unsignaled, and renewal) and two context-guided object recognition tasks (with 3-dimensional and 2-dimensional objects), we examined the effects of crossed excitotoxic lesions to the POR and the contralateral PER...
April 14, 2017: Journal of Neuroscience: the Official Journal of the Society for Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28406569/ischial-form-as-an-indicator-of-bipedal-kinematics-in-early-hominins-a-test-using-extant-anthropoids
#12
Kristi L Lewton, Jeremiah E Scott
Human ischia contrast with those of great apes in being craniocaudally short and dorsally projecting. This configuration is thought to facilitate greater hip extension in humans during bipedal locomotion. This link has been used to infer kinematics in early hominins, but the consequences of variation in ischial configuration for gait remain uncertain. Kinematic data for a limited sample of extant nonhuman primates demonstrate that there is variation in hip extension in these taxa during bipedal behaviors-specifically, Hylobates and Ateles are capable of greater extension than Pan and Macaca...
May 2017: Anatomical Record: Advances in Integrative Anatomy and Evolutionary Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28400817/nonhuman-primate-models-of-focal-cerebral-ischemia
#13
REVIEW
Jingjing Fan, Yi Li, Xinyu Fu, Lijuan Li, Xiaoting Hao, Shasha Li
Rodents have been widely used in the production of cerebral ischemia models. However, successful therapies have been proven on experimental rodent stroke model, and they have often failed to be effective when tested clinically. Therefore, nonhuman primates were recommended as the ideal alternatives, owing to their similarities with the human cerebrovascular system, brain metabolism, grey to white matter ratio and even their rich behavioral repertoire. The present review is a thorough summary of ten methods that establish nonhuman primate models of focal cerebral ischemia; electrocoagulation, endothelin-1-induced occlusion, microvascular clip occlusion, autologous blood clot embolization, balloon inflation, microcatheter embolization, coil embolization, surgical suture embolization, suture, and photochemical induction methods...
February 2017: Neural Regeneration Research
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28400206/elucidation-of-developmental-patterns-of-marmoset-corpus-callosum-through-a-comparative-mri-in-marmosets-chimpanzees-and-humans
#14
Tomoko Sakai, Yuji Komaki, Junichi Hata, Junko Okahara, Norio Okahara, Takashi Inoue, Akichika Mikami, Mie Matsui, Kenichi Oishi, Erika Sasaki, Hideyuki Okano
The corpus callosum (CC) is present in all primate brains and is the major white matter tract connecting the cerebral hemispheres for integration of sensory, motor and higher-order cognitive information. The midsagittal area of the CC has frequently been used as a sensitive biomarker of brain development. Although the marmoset has been considered as an alternative non-human primate model for neuroscience research, the developmental patterns of the CC have not been explored. The present longitudinal study of magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated that marmosets show a rapid increase of CC during infancy, followed by a slow increase during the juvenile stage, as observed in chimpanzees and humans...
April 8, 2017: Neuroscience Research
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28400103/common-marmoset-callithrix-jacchus-as-a-primate-model-for-behavioral-neuroscience-studies
#15
Noeline W Prins, Eric Pohlmeyer, Shubham Debnath, Ramanamurthy Mylavarapu, Shijia Geng, Justin C Sanchez, Daniel Rothen, Abhishek Prasad
BACKGROUND: The common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus) has been proposed as a suitable bridge between rodents and larger primates. They have been used in several types of research including auditory, vocal, visual, pharmacological and genetics studies. However, marmosets have not been used as much for behavioral studies. NEW METHOD: Here we present data from training 12 adult marmosets for behavioral neuroscience studies. We discuss the husbandry, food preferences, handling, acclimation to laboratory environments and neurosurgical techniques...
April 8, 2017: Journal of Neuroscience Methods
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28391066/lesion-evidence-for-a-human-mirror-neuron-system
#16
Ellen Binder, Anna Dovern, Maike D Hesse, Markus Ebke, Hans Karbe, Jochen Saliger, Gereon R Fink, Peter H Weiss
More than two decades ago, the mirror neuron system (MNS) was discovered in non-human primates: Single-cell recordings detected visuo-motor neurons that discharged not only when the monkey performed an action, but also when it observed conspecifics performing the same action. It has been proposed that a fronto-parietal circuitry constitutes the human homolog of the MNS. However, the functional role of a human MNS (i.e., whether it is functionally necessary for imitation or action understanding) to date remains controversial...
February 24, 2017: Cortex; a Journal Devoted to the Study of the Nervous System and Behavior
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28384427/primate-resting-postures-constraints-by-foregut-fermentation
#17
Ikki Matsuda, Colin A Chapman, Chua Ying Shi Physilia, John Chih Mun Sha, Marcus Clauss
Although resting is one of the dominant behaviors of foregut-fermenting primates (i.e., colobines), their resting posture has rarely received attention. We hypothesize that colobines are more constrained in their resting position than hindgut-fermenting primates and that colobines assume a sitting resting position for specific reasons. To test this hypothesis, we followed two approaches. First, we observed resting positions in two captive individuals each of eight species and tested whether colobines rested in a sitting position more than other primates...
May 2017: Physiological and Biochemical Zoology: PBZ
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28381592/strength-and-diversity-of-inhibitory-signaling-differentiates-primate-anterior-cingulate-from-lateral-prefrontal-cortex
#18
Maria Medalla, Joshua P Gilman, Jing-Yi Wang, Jennifer I Luebke
The lateral prefrontal cortex (LPFC) and anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) of the primate play distinctive roles in the mediation of complex cognitive tasks. Compared to the LPFC, integration of information by the ACC can span longer timescales and requires stronger engagement of inhibitory processes. Here, we reveal the synaptic mechanism likely to underlie these differences, using in vitro patch-clamp recordings of synaptic events and multi-scale imaging of synaptic markers in rhesus monkeys. While excitatory synaptic signaling does not differ, the level of synaptic inhibition is much higher in ACC than LPFC layer 3 pyramidal neurons- with a ∼6x higher frequency and significantly longer duration of inhibitory synaptic currents...
April 5, 2017: Journal of Neuroscience: the Official Journal of the Society for Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28379987/great-apes-distinguish-true-from-false-beliefs-in-an-interactive-helping-task
#19
David Buttelmann, Frances Buttelmann, Malinda Carpenter, Josep Call, Michael Tomasello
Understanding the behavior of others in a wide variety of circumstances requires an understanding of their psychological states. Humans' nearest primate relatives, the great apes, understand many psychological states of others, for example, perceptions, goals, and desires. However, so far there is little evidence that they possess the key marker of advanced human social cognition: an understanding of false beliefs. Here we demonstrate that in a nonverbal (implicit) false-belief test which is passed by human 1-year-old infants, great apes as a group, including chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes), bonobos (Pan paniscus), and orangutans (Pongo abelii), distinguish between true and false beliefs in their helping behavior...
2017: PloS One
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28375078/a-causal-relationship-between-face-patch-activity-and-face-detection-behavior
#20
Srivatsun Sadagopan, Wilbert Zarco, Winrich A Freiwald
The primate brain contains distinct areas densely populated by face-selective neurons. One of these, face-patch ML, contains neurons selective for contrast relationships between face parts. Such contrast-relationships can serve as powerful heuristics for face detection. However, it is unknown whether neurons with such selectivity actually support face-detection behavior. Here, we devised a naturalistic face-detection task and combined it with fMRI-guided pharmacological inactivation of ML to test whether ML is of critical importance for real-world face detection...
April 4, 2017: ELife
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