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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28227621/non-contact-automatic-respiration-monitoring-in-restrained-rodents
#1
Behnaz Rezaei, Jared Lowe, Jason R Yee, Stephen Porges, Sarah Ostadabbas, Behnaz Rezaei, Jared Lowe, Jason R Yee, Stephen Porges, Sarah Ostadabbas, Sarah Ostadabbas, Jason R Yee, Stephen Porges, Jared Lowe, Behnaz Rezaei
Prairie voles are socially monogamous rodents that form social bonds similar to those seen in primates. Social behavior investigation in these species, that include studying their breathing regulation, can provide us with an invaluable psychological model to understand social and emotional functions in both animals and humans. There have been several studies associated with the respiratory pattern of these species in the state of fear-induced defense. However, non-invasive measurement methods employed so far suffer from the lack of a natural experiment environment for the rodents...
August 2016: Conference Proceedings: Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28226823/properties-of-primary-motor-cortical-local-field-potentials-in-the-leg-and-trunk-representations-during-arm-movements
#2
Adil A Tobaa, Matthew D Best, Karthikeyan Balasubramanian, Kazutaka Takahashi, Nicholas G Hatsopoulos, Adil A Tobaa, Matthew D Best, Karthikeyan Balasubramanian, Kazutaka Takahashi, Nicholas G Hatsopoulos, Adil A Tobaa, Matthew D Best, Karthikeyan Balasubramanian, Kazutaka Takahashi, Nicholas G Hatsopoulos
Large, spatially-distributed populations of motor cortical neurons are recruited during upper limb movements. Here, we examined how beta attenuation, a mesoscopic reflection of unit engagement, varies across a spatially expansive sampling of primary motor cortex in a non-human primate (macaca mulatta). We found that electrodes in both the trunk and leg representation of motor cortex exhibit qualitatively similar behavior to electrodes in the arm representation during a planar reaching task, despite the fact that there were no overt movements of the trunk or leg...
August 2016: Conference Proceedings: Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28226201/genomewide-association-study-of-alcohol-dependence-identifies-risk-loci-altering-ethanol-response-behaviors-in-model-organisms
#3
Amy E Adkins, Laura M Hack, Tim B Bigdeli, Vernell S Williamson, G Omari McMichael, Mohammed Mamdani, Alexis Edwards, Fazil Aliev, Robin F Chan, Poonam Bhandari, Richard C Raabe, Joseph T Alaimo, GinaMari G Blackwell, Arden A Moscati, Ryan S Poland, Benjamin Rood, Diana G Patterson, Dermot Walsh, John B Whitfield, Gu Zhu, Grant W Montgomery, Anjali K Henders, Nicholas G Martin, Andrew C Heath, Pamela A F Madden, Josef Frank, Monika Ridinger, Norbert Wodarz, Michael Soyka, Peter Zill, Marcus Ising, Markus M Nöthen, Falk Kiefer, Marcella Rietschel, Joel Gelernter, Richard Sherva, Ryan Koesterer, Laura Almasy, Hongyu Zhao, Henry R Kranzler, Lindsay A Farrer, Brion S Maher, Carol A Prescott, Danielle M Dick, Silviu A Bacanu, Laura D Mathies, Andrew G Davies, Vladimir I Vladimirov, Mike Grotewiel, M Scott Bowers, Jill C Bettinger, Bradley T Webb, Michael F Miles, Kenneth S Kendler, Brien P Riley
BACKGROUND: Alcohol Dependence (AD) shows evidence for genetic liability, but genes influencing risk remain largely unidentified. METHODS: We conducted a genomewide association study in 706 related AD cases and 1748 unscreened population controls from Ireland. We sought replication in 15,496 samples of European descent. We used model organisms to assess the role of orthologous genes in ethanol response behaviors. We tested one primate-specific gene for expression differences in case/control post-mortem brain tissue...
February 22, 2017: Alcoholism, Clinical and Experimental Research
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28221080/blockade-of-glutamatergic-transmission-in-the-primate-basolateral-amygdala-suppresses-active-behavior-without-altering-social-interaction
#4
Patrick A Forcelli, Laurie L Wellman, Ludise Malkova
The amygdala is an integrator of affective processing, and a key component of a network regulating social behavior. While decades of lesion studies in nonhuman primates have shown alterations in social interactions after amygdala damage, acute manipulations of the amygdala in primates have been underexplored. We recently reported (Wellman, Forcelli, Aguilar, & Malkova, 2016) that acute pharmacological inhibition of the basolateral complex of the amygdala (BLA) or the central nucleus of the amygdala increased affiliative social interactions in experimental dyads of macaques; this was achieved through microinjection of a GABA-A receptor agonist...
February 20, 2017: Behavioral Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28220796/beyond-the-classic-vta-extended-amygdala-projections-to-da-striatal-paths-in-the-primate
#5
Julie L Fudge, Emily A Kelly, Ria Pal, Joseph L Bedont, Lydia Park, Brian Ho
The central extended amygdala (CEA) has been conceptualized as a 'macrosystem' that regulates various stress-induced behaviors. Consistent with this, the CEA highly expresses corticotropin releasing factor (CRF), an important modulator of stress responses. Stress alters goal-directed responses associated with striatal paths, including maladaptive responses such as drug seeking, social withdrawal, and compulsive behavior. CEA inputs to the midbrain dopamine (DA) system are positioned to influence striatal functions through mesolimbic DA-striatal pathways...
February 21, 2017: Neuropsychopharmacology: Official Publication of the American College of Neuropsychopharmacology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28220080/validation-of-a-method-for-the-assessment-of-urinary-neopterin-levels-to-monitor-health-status-in-non-human-primate-species
#6
Verena Behringer, Jeroen M G Stevens, Fabian H Leendertz, Gottfried Hohmann, Tobias Deschner
Determining individual health status is of great importance for a better understanding of life history trade-offs between growth, reproduction, and maintenance. However, existing immunological methods are invasive and therefore not suitable for investigating health status in wild populations. Thus, there is an urgent need for non-invasive methods to assess the immune status of animals. Neopterin is involved in the cell-mediated pathway of the immune response (Th1-type), secreted during the activation of monocytes and macrophages...
2017: Frontiers in Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28214131/social-decision-making-and-the-brain-a-comparative-perspective
#7
REVIEW
Sébastien Tremblay, K M Sharika, Michael L Platt
The capacity and motivation to be social is a key component of the human adaptive behavioral repertoire. Recent research has identified social behaviors remarkably similar to our own in other animals, including empathy, consolation, cooperation, and strategic deception. Moreover, neurobiological studies in humans, nonhuman primates, and rodents have identified shared brain structures (the so-called 'social brain') apparently specialized to mediate such functions. Neuromodulators may regulate social interactions by 'tuning' the social brain, with important implications for treating social impairments...
February 14, 2017: Trends in Cognitive Sciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28212416/the-variability-of-multisensory-processes-of-natural-stimuli-in-human-and-non-human-primates-in-a-detection-task
#8
Cécile Juan, Céline Cappe, Baptiste Alric, Benoit Roby, Sophie Gilardeau, Pascal Barone, Pascal Girard
BACKGROUND: Behavioral studies in both human and animals generally converge to the dogma that multisensory integration improves reaction times (RTs) in comparison to unimodal stimulation. These multisensory effects depend on diverse conditions among which the most studied were the spatial and temporal congruences. Further, most of the studies are using relatively simple stimuli while in everyday life, we are confronted to a large variety of complex stimulations constantly changing our attentional focus over time, a modality switch that can impact on stimuli detection...
2017: PloS One
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28205407/collagen-fiber-orientation-in-primate-long-bones
#9
Johanna Warshaw, Timothy G Bromage, Carl J Terranova, Donald H Enlow
Studies of variation in orientation of collagen fibers within bone have lead to the proposition that these are preferentially aligned to accommodate different kinds of load, with tension best resisted by fibers aligned longitudinally relative to the load, and compression best resisted by transversely aligned fibers. However, previous studies have often neglected to consider the effect of developmental processes, including constraints on collagen fiber orientation (CFO), particularly in primary bone. Here we use circularly polarized light microscopy to examine patterns of CFO in cross-sections from the midshaft femur, humerus, tibia, radius and ulna in a range of living primate taxa with varied body sizes, phylogenetic relationships and positional behaviors...
February 16, 2017: Anatomical Record: Advances in Integrative Anatomy and Evolutionary Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28203143/pregenual-anterior-cingulate-gyrus-involvement-in-spontaneous-social-interactions-in-primates-evidence-from-behavioral-pharmacological-neuropsychiatric-and-neurophysiological-findings
#10
Can Van Mao, Mariana F P Araujo, Hiroshi Nishimaru, Jumpei Matsumoto, Ahn Hai Tran, Etsuro Hori, Taketoshi Ono, Hisao Nishijo
The anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) has been implicated in different aspects of cognition and decision making, including social cognition. Several studies suggest that this region is actually formed by sub-regions concerned with distinct cognitive functions. The ACC is usually divided in its rostro-caudal axis, with the caudal ACC playing a major role in processing own actions, and the rostral ACC being related to social cognition. Recently, it has been suggested that the ACC can also be functionally divided in its dorso-ventral axis into ACC gyrus (ACCg) and ACC sulcus (ACCs), with the ACCg having a central role in processing social information...
2017: Frontiers in Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28202786/dopamine-modulates-adaptive-prediction-error-coding-in-the-human-midbrain-and-striatum
#11
Kelly M J Diederen, Hisham Ziauddeen, Martin D Vestergaard, Tom Spencer, Wolfram Schultz, Paul C Fletcher
Learning to optimally predict rewards requires agents to account for fluctuations in reward value. Recent work suggests that individuals can efficiently learn about variable rewards through adaptation of the learning rate, and coding of prediction errors relative to reward variability. Such adaptive coding has been linked to midbrain dopamine neurons in nonhuman primates, and evidence in support for a similar role of the dopaminergic system in humans is emerging from fMRI data. Here, we sought to investigate the effect of dopaminergic perturbations on adaptive prediction error coding in humans, using a between-subject, placebo-controlled pharmacological fMRI study with a dopaminergic agonist (bromocriptine) and antagonist (sulpiride)...
February 15, 2017: Journal of Neuroscience: the Official Journal of the Society for Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28202622/the-hypertension-pandemic-an-evolutionary-perspective
#12
REVIEW
Bernard C Rossier, Murielle Bochud, Olivier Devuyst
Hypertension affects over 1.2 billion individuals worldwide and has become the most critical and expensive public health problem. Hypertension is a multifactorial disease involving environmental and genetic factors together with risk-conferring behaviors. The cause of the disease is identified in ∼10% of the cases (secondary hypertension), but in 90% of the cases no etiology is found (primary or essential hypertension). For this reason, a better understanding of the mechanisms controlling blood pressure in normal and hypertensive patients is the aim of very active experimental and clinical research...
March 2017: Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28202470/the-effect-of-foot-posture-on-capacity-to-apply-free-moments-to-the-ground-implications-for-fighting-performance-in-great-apes
#13
David R Carrier, Christopher Cunningham
In contrast to most other primates, great apes have feet in which the heel supports body weight during standing, walking and running. One possible advantage of this plantigrade foot posture is that it may enhance fighting performance by increasing the ability to apply free moments (i.e. force couples) to the ground. We tested this possibility by measuring performance of human subjects when performing from plantigrade and digitigrade (standing on the ball of the foot and toes) postures. We found that plantigrade posture substantially increased the capacity to apply free moments to the ground and to perform a variety of behaviors that are likely to be important to fighting performance in great apes...
February 15, 2017: Biology Open
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28202354/non-invasive-monitoring-of-physiological-markers-in-primates
#14
REVIEW
V Behringer, T Deschner
The monitoring of endocrine markers that inform about an animal's physiological state has become an invaluable tool for studying the behavioral ecology of primates. While the collection of blood samples usually requires the animal to be caught and immobilized, non-invasively collected samples of saliva, urine, feces or hair can be obtained without any major disturbance of the subject of interest. Such samples enable repeated collection which is required for matching behavioral information over long time periods with detailed information on endocrine markers...
February 12, 2017: Hormones and Behavior
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28199986/a-tree-shrew-glioblastoma-model-recapitulates-features-of-human-glioblastoma
#15
Yaohui Tong, Junjun Hao, Qiu Tu, Hualin Yu, Lanzhen Yan, Yuan Li, Longbao Lv, Fei Wang, Antonio Iavarone, Xudong Zhao
Tupaia belangeri (tree shrew), an animal species whose genome has significantly higher similarity to primates than rodents, has been used in biomedical research. To generate animal models that reproduce the human tumors more faithfully than rodents, we present the first report of a cancer model mimicking human tumor genetics in tree shrew. By engineering a lentiviral system for the transduction of mutant H-Ras and a shRNA against tree shrew p53, we successfully generated malignant glioma in tree shrew. The tree shrew glioma exhibited aggressive behavior and a relatively short latency, and markedly reduced animal survival...
February 9, 2017: Oncotarget
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28199172/behavioral-phenotyping-assays-for-genetic-mouse-models-of-neurodevelopmental-neurodegenerative-and-psychiatric-disorders
#16
Stacey J Sukoff Rizzo, Jacqueline N Crawley
Animal models offer heuristic research tools to understand the causes of human diseases and to identify potential treatments. With rapidly evolving genetic engineering technologies, mutations identified in a human disorder can be generated in the mouse genome. Phenotypic outcomes of the mutation are then explicated to confirm hypotheses about causes and to discover effective therapeutics. Most neurodevelopmental, neurodegenerative, and psychiatric disorders are diagnosed primarily by their prominent behavioral symptoms...
February 8, 2017: Annual Review of Animal Biosciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28196398/factors-of-influence-and-social-correlates-of-parturition-in-captive-campbell-s-monkeys-case-study-and-breeding-data
#17
Alban Lemasson, Ronan Jubin, Philippe Bec, Martine Hausberger
How nonhuman primates deal with birth, at the moment of delivery, and during the following days, remains poorly explored because of the unpredictability of this event, particularly for forest-dwelling arboreal species. Available studies highlight intra- and interspecific variation which suggest flexibility of the timing of delivery, of behavior associated with labor contractions and parturition, and the social context and ambient noise surrounding delivery. Here, we present the findings of a two-decade survey of reproduction in a population of captive Campbell's monkeys...
February 14, 2017: American Journal of Primatology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28191878/new-variations-for-strategy-set-shifting-in-the-rat
#18
Sho Aoki, Andrew W Liu, Aya Zucca, Stefano Zucca, Jeffery R Wickens
Behavioral flexibility is crucial for survival in changing environments. Broadly defined, behavioral flexibility requires a shift of behavioral strategy based on a change in governing rules. We describe a strategy set-shifting task that requires an attentional shift from one stimulus dimension to another. The paradigm is often used for testing cognitive flexibility in primates. However, the rodent version has not been as extensively developed. We have recently extended an established set-shifting task in the rat(1) by requiring attention to different stimuli according to context...
January 23, 2017: Journal of Visualized Experiments: JoVE
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28186699/activity-budget-and-social-interactions-in-semi-captive-gray-woolly-monkeys-lagothrix-lagotricha-cana-living-in-an-ex-situ-conservation-area-in-central-amazonia
#19
Bárbara Cartagena-Matos, Thierry Gasnier, Mariana Cravo-Mota, Bruna Martins Bezerra
Areas holding primates in semi-captivity conditions represent an excellent opportunity for collecting data on rare, little known, and endangered taxa, contributing with insightful information to help in their conservation. Here, we present information on the activity budget and social interactions of the elusive gray woolly monkeys, Lagothrix lagotricha cana, in an ex situ conservation area in central Amazonia. We studied the behavior of 18 semi-captive individuals through instantaneous scan and focal animal samplings during 4 months in the wet season...
January 2017: Zoo Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28185863/offspring-mortality-was-a-determinant-factor-in-the-evolution-of-paternal-investment-in-humans-an-evolutionary-game-approach
#20
Diego López Alonso, Isabel M Ortiz-Rodríguez
Some researchers support the belief that man evolved philandering behavior because of the greater reproductive success of promiscuous males. According to this idea, deserting behavior from the man should be expected along with null paternal involvement in offspring care. Paradoxically however, the average offspring investment in the human male is far higher than that of any other male mammal, including other primates. In our work, we have addressed this conundrum by employing evolutionary game theory, using objective payoffs instead of, as are commonly used, arbitrary payoffs...
February 7, 2017: Journal of Theoretical Biology
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