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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28105722/charting-the-neglected-west-the-social-system-of-guinea-baboons
#1
Julia Fischer, Gisela H Kopp, Federica Dal Pesco, Adeelia Goffe, Kurt Hammerschmidt, Urs Kalbitzer, Matthias Klapproth, Peter Maciej, Ibrahima Ndao, Annika Patzelt, Dietmar Zinner
OBJECTIVES: Primate social systems are remarkably diverse, and thus play a central role in understanding social evolution, including the biological origin of human societies. Although baboons have been prominently featured in this context, historically little was known about the westernmost member of the genus, the Guinea baboon (Papio papio). MATERIAL AND METHODS: Here, we summarize the findings from the first years of observations at the field site CRP Simenti in the Niokolo Koba National Park in Senegal...
January 2017: American Journal of Physical Anthropology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28105720/primates-on-display-potential-disease-consequences-beyond-bushmeat
#2
Michael P Muehlenbein
Human interactions with nonhuman primates vary tremendously, from daily cultural engagements and food commodities, to pet ownership and tourist encounters. These interactions provide opportunities for the exchange of pathogenic organisms (both zoonoses and anthroponoses). As exposures are not limited to areas where bushmeat usage continues to be a major problem, we must work to understand better our motivations for engaging in activities like owning primates as pets and having direct physical contact with wild primates within the context of nature-based tourism...
January 2017: American Journal of Physical Anthropology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28105716/what-does-variation-in-primate-behavior-mean
#3
Karen B Strier
Interest in intraspecific behavioral variation has grown with concerns about the ability of primates to adapt to the rapidly changing ecological and demographic conditions that threaten their survival. Now, in addition to identifying the causes and phylogenetic distribution of normative, species-specific behavior patterns for interspecific comparisons, there is widespread recognition of the need to incorporate intraspecific variation. This variation is evident across groups and populations of the same species as well over the long histories of single groups of long-lived, socially complex animals with overlapping generations...
January 2017: American Journal of Physical Anthropology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28100659/a-neural-locus-for-spatial-frequency-specific-saccadic-suppression-in-visual-motor-neurons-of-the-primate-superior-colliculus
#4
Chih-Yang Chen, Ziad M Hafed
Saccades cause rapid retinal-image shifts that go perceptually unnoticed several times per second. The mechanisms for saccadic suppression have been controversial, in part due to sparse understanding of neural substrates. Here we uncovered an unexpectedly specific neural locus for spatial-frequency specific saccadic suppression in the superior colliculus (SC). We first developed a sensitive behavioral measure of suppression in two macaque monkeys, demonstrating selectivity to low spatial frequencies similar to that observed in earlier behavioral studies...
January 18, 2017: Journal of Neurophysiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28095604/vocal-repertoire-of-free-ranging-black-howler-monkeys-alouatta-pigra-call-types-contexts-and-sex-related-contributions
#5
Margarita Briseño-Jaramillo, Véronique Biquand, Alejandro Estrada, Alban Lemasson
Alouatta species utter the most powerful primate vocalizations in the Neotropics and are well-known for their loud and long-lasting male howling bouts. However, the diversity of acoustic structures used in these howling bouts, as well as in non-howling contexts, and the relative contribution of the different group members to the entire vocal repertoire, needed to be explored further. This report provides the first detailed description of the vocal repertoire of black howler monkeys (Alouatta pigra), focusing on acoustic structures and contexts of emission of both loud and soft calls as well as on the contribution rate of males and females to the different call types...
January 17, 2017: American Journal of Primatology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28094034/dynamical-representation-of-dominance-relationships-in-the-human-rostromedial-prefrontal-cortex
#6
Romain Ligneul, Ignacio Obeso, Christian C Ruff, Jean-Claude Dreher
Humans and other primates have evolved the ability to represent their status in the group's social hierarchy, which is essential for avoiding harm and accessing resources. Yet it remains unclear how the human brain learns dominance status and adjusts behavior accordingly during dynamic social interactions. Here we address this issue with a combination of fMRI and transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS). In a first fMRI experiment, participants learned an implicit dominance hierarchy while playing a competitive game against three opponents of different skills...
December 5, 2016: Current Biology: CB
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28093479/paired-stimulation-for-spike-timing-dependent-plasticity-in-primate-sensorimotor-cortex
#7
Stephanie C Seeman, Brian J Mogen, Eberhard E Fetz, Steve I Perlmutter
: Classic studies in vitro have described spike-timing dependent plasticity (STDP) at a synapse: the connection from neuron A to neuron B is strengthened (or weakened) when A fires before (or after) B within an optimal time window. Accordingly, more recent in vivo works have demonstrated behavioral effects consistent with an STDP mechanism; however many relied on single-unit recordings. The ability to modify cortical connections becomes useful in the context of injury when connectivity, and associated behavior, is compromised...
January 16, 2017: Journal of Neuroscience: the Official Journal of the Society for Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28089759/using-pupil-size-and-heart-rate-to-infer-affective-states-during-behavioral-neurophysiology-and-neuropsychology-experiments
#8
Andrew R Mitz, Ravi V Chacko, Philip T Putnam, Peter H Rudebeck, Elisabeth A Murray
BACKGROUND: Nonhuman primates (NHPs) are a valuable research model because of their behavioral, physiological and neuroanatomical similarities to humans. In the absence of language, autonomic activity can provide crucial information about cognitive and affective states during single-unit recording, inactivation and lesion studies. Methods standardized for use in humans are not easily adapted to NHPs and detailed guidance has been lacking. NEW METHOD: We provide guidance for monitoring heart rate and pupil size in the behavioral neurophysiology setting by addressing the methodological issues, pitfalls and solutions for NHP studies...
January 13, 2017: Journal of Neuroscience Methods
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28087242/brains-for-birds-and-babies-neural-parallels-between-birdsong-and-speech-acquisition
#9
REVIEW
Jonathan Prather, Kazuo Okanoya, Johan J Bolhuis
Language as a computational cognitive mechanism appears to be unique to the human species. However, there are remarkable behavioral similarities between song learning in songbirds and speech acquisition in human infants that are absent in non-human primates. Here we review important neural parallels between birdsong and speech. In both cases there are separate but continually interacting neural networks that underlie vocal production, sensorimotor learning, and auditory perception and memory. As in the case of human speech, neural activity related to birdsong learning is lateralized, and mirror neurons linking perception and performance may contribute to sensorimotor learning...
January 10, 2017: Neuroscience and Biobehavioral Reviews
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28065412/quantitative-predictions-orchestrate-visual-signaling-in-drosophila
#10
Anmo J Kim, Lisa M Fenk, Cheng Lyu, Gaby Maimon
Vision influences behavior, but ongoing behavior also modulates vision in animals ranging from insects to primates. The function and biophysical mechanisms of most such modulations remain unresolved. Here, we combine behavioral genetics, electrophysiology, and high-speed videography to advance a function for behavioral modulations of visual processing in Drosophila. We argue that a set of motion-sensitive visual neurons regulate gaze-stabilizing head movements. We describe how, during flight turns, Drosophila perform a set of head movements that require silencing their gaze-stability reflexes along the primary rotation axis of the turn...
January 12, 2017: Cell
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28065215/a-comparative-and-evolutionary-analysis-of-the-cultural-cognition-of-humans-and-other-apes
#11
Andrew Whiten
The comparative and evolutionary analysis of social learning and all manner of cultural processes has become a flourishing field. Applying the 'comparative method' to such phenomena allows us to exploit the good fortunate we have in being able to study them in satisfying detail in our living primate relatives, using the results to reconstruct the cultural cognition of the ancestral forms we share with these species. Here I offer an overview of principal discoveries in recent years, organized through a developing scheme that targets three main dimensions of culture: the patterning of culturally transmitted traditions in time and space; the underlying social learning processes; and the particular behavioral and psychological contents of cultures...
January 9, 2017: Spanish Journal of Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28063661/the-distributed-nature-of-working-memory
#12
REVIEW
Thomas B Christophel, P Christiaan Klink, Bernhard Spitzer, Pieter R Roelfsema, John-Dylan Haynes
Studies in humans and non-human primates have provided evidence for storage of working memory contents in multiple regions ranging from sensory to parietal and prefrontal cortex. We discuss potential explanations for these distributed representations: (i) features in sensory regions versus prefrontal cortex differ in the level of abstractness and generalizability; and (ii) features in prefrontal cortex reflect representations that are transformed for guidance of upcoming behavioral actions. We propose that the propensity to produce persistent activity is a general feature of cortical networks...
January 4, 2017: Trends in Cognitive Sciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28063612/conserved-sequence-processing-in-primate-frontal-cortex
#13
REVIEW
Benjamin Wilson, William D Marslen-Wilson, Christopher I Petkov
An important aspect of animal perception and cognition is learning to recognize relationships between environmental events that predict others in time, a form of relational knowledge that can be assessed using sequence-learning paradigms. Humans are exquisitely sensitive to sequencing relationships, and their combinatorial capacities, most saliently in the domain of language, are unparalleled. Recent comparative research in human and nonhuman primates has obtained behavioral and neuroimaging evidence for evolutionarily conserved substrates involved in sequence processing...
January 4, 2017: Trends in Neurosciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28059083/behavioral-determinants-of-cannabinoid-self-administration-in-old-world-monkeys
#14
William S John, Thomas J Martin, Michael A Nader
Reinforcing effects of Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the primary active ingredient in marijuana, as assessed with self-administration (SA), has only been established in New World primates (squirrel monkeys). The objective of this study was to investigate some experimental factors that may enhance intravenous SA of THC and the cannabinoid receptor (CBR) agonist CP 55 940 in Old World monkeys (rhesus and cynomolgus), a species that has been used extensively in biomedical research. In one experiment, male rhesus monkeys (N=9) were trained to respond under a fixed-ratio 10 schedule of food presentation...
January 6, 2017: Neuropsychopharmacology: Official Publication of the American College of Neuropsychopharmacology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28057458/the-inferior-parietal-lobule-and-temporoparietal-junction-a-network-perspective
#15
Kajsa M Igelström, Michael S A Graziano
Information processing in specialized, spatially distributed brain networks underlies the diversity and complexity of our cognitive and behavioral repertoire. Networks converge at a small number of hubs - highly connected regions that are central for multimodal integration and higher-order cognition. We review one major network hub of the human brain: the inferior parietal lobule and the overlapping temporoparietal junction (IPL/TPJ). The IPL is greatly expanded in humans compared to other primates and matures late in human development, consistent with its importance in higher-order functions...
January 2, 2017: Neuropsychologia
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28055132/identifying-future-drinkers-behavioral-analysis-of-monkeys-initiating-drinking-to-intoxication-is-predictive-of-future-drinking-classification
#16
Erich J Baker, Nicole A R Walter, Alex Salo, Pablo Rivas, Sharon Moore, Steven Gonzales, Kathleen A Grant
BACKGROUND: The Monkey Alcohol and Tissue Research Resource (MATRR) is a repository and analytics platform for detailed data derived from well-documented Non-Human Primate (NHP) alcohol self-administration studies. This macaque model has demonstrated categorical drinking norms reflective of human drinking populations, resulting in consumption pattern classifications of Very Heavy Drinking (VHD), Heavy Drinking (HD), Binge Drinking (BD), and Low Drinking (LD) individuals. Here we expand on previous findings that suggest ethanol drinking patterns during initial drinking to intoxication can reliably predict future drinking category assignment...
January 5, 2017: Alcoholism, Clinical and Experimental Research
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28051934/neural-mechanisms-of-selective-visual-attention
#17
Tirin Moore, Marc Zirnsak
Selective visual attention describes the tendency of visual processing to be confined largely to stimuli that are relevant to behavior. It is among the most fundamental of cognitive functions, particularly in humans and other primates for whom vision is the dominant sense. We review recent progress in identifying the neural mechanisms of selective visual attention. We discuss evidence from studies of different varieties of selective attention and examine how these varieties alter the processing of stimuli by neurons within the visual system, current knowledge of their causal basis, and methods for assessing attentional dysfunctions...
January 3, 2017: Annual Review of Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28045298/rats-show-adaptive-choice-in-a-metacognitive-task-with-high-uncertainty
#18
Shoko Yuki, Kazuo Okanoya
Metacognition refers to the use of one's cognitive processes to coordinate behavior. Many higher cognitive functions such as feeling-of-knowing judgment and theory of mind are thought to be metacognitive processes. Although some primate species also show this ability in the form of behavioral control, a rodent model of metacognition is required for advanced studies of this phenomenon at behavioral, molecular, and neural levels. Here we show that rats could reliably be trained in a metacognitive task. The rats were trained to remember the location of a nose-poke hole and later indicate the location via a behavioral task...
January 2017: Journal of Experimental Psychology. Animal Learning and Cognition
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28041797/sharp-wave-ripples-in-primates-are-enhanced-near-remembered-visual-objects
#19
Timothy K Leonard, Kari L Hoffman
The hippocampus plays an important role in memory for events that are distinct in space and time. One of the strongest, most synchronous neural signals produced by the hippocampus is the sharp-wave ripple (SWR), observed in a variety of mammalian species during offline behaviors, such as slow-wave sleep [1-3] and quiescent waking and pauses in exploration [4-8], leading to long-standing and widespread theories of its contribution to plasticity and memory during these inactive or immobile states [9-14]. Indeed, during sleep and waking inactivity, hippocampal SWRs in rodents appear to support spatial long-term and working memory [4, 15-23], but so far, they have not been linked to memory in primates...
December 21, 2016: Current Biology: CB
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28041615/functional-anatomy-of-the-macaque-temporo-parieto-frontal-connectivity
#20
REVIEW
Elena Borra, Giuseppe Luppino
The primate parietal lobe is primarily dedicated to the processing of sensory information for the guidance of motor behavior, based on the integration of sensory with motor signals (sensorimotor transformations), mediated by specific, strong, and reciprocal connections with the motor cortex. Sensorimotor transformations have been regarded as an automatic process carried out independently from the temporal cortex, which is considered the location where sensory information is used for perceptual processes. However, both human and non-human primate studies have shown interactions between these two regions in different aspects of sensorimotor and cognitive processes...
December 18, 2016: Cortex; a Journal Devoted to the Study of the Nervous System and Behavior
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