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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28816571/effects-of-flow-changes-on-radiotracer-binding-simultaneous-measurement-of-neuroreceptor-binding-and-cerebral-blood-flow-modulation
#1
Christin Y Sander, Joseph B Mandeville, Hsiao-Ying Wey, Ciprian Catana, Jacob M Hooker, Bruce R Rosen
The potential effects of changes in blood flow on the delivery and washout of radiotracers has been an ongoing question in PET bolus injection studies. This study provides practical insight into this topic by experimentally measuring cerebral blood flow (CBF) and neuroreceptor binding using simultaneous PET/MRI. Hypercapnic challenges (7% CO2) were administered to non-human primates in order to induce controlled increases in CBF, measured with pseudo-continuous arterial spin labeling. Simultaneously, dopamine D2/D3 receptor binding of [(11)C]raclopride or [(18)F]fallypride was monitored with dynamic PET...
January 1, 2017: Journal of Cerebral Blood Flow and Metabolism
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28813264/the-neurobiology-of-fatherhood
#2
REVIEW
James K Rilling, Jennifer S Mascaro
Only about 5% of mammalian species exhibit paternal caregiving in nature, and paternal behavior has evolved multiple times independently among mammals. The most parsimonious way to evolve paternal behavior may be to utilize pre-existing neural systems that are in place for maternal behavior. Despite evidence for similarity in the neurobiology of maternal and paternal behavior in rodents, paternal behavior also has its own dedicated neural circuitry in some species. Human fathers engage conserved subcortical systems that motivate caregiving in rodent parents and human mothers, as well as cortical systems involved with empathy that they share with human mothers...
June 2017: Current Opinion in Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28811538/fine-structure-of-posterior-alpha-rhythm-in-human-eeg-frequency-components-their-cortical-sources-and-temporal-behavior
#3
Elham Barzegaran, Vladimir Y Vildavski, Maria G Knyazeva
Heterogeneity of the posterior alpha rhythm (AR) is a widely assumed but rarely tested phenomenon. We decomposed the posterior AR in the cortical source space with a 3-way PARAFAC technique, taking into account the spatial, frequency, and temporal aspects of mid-density EEG. We found a multicomponent AR structure in 90% of a group of 29 healthy adults. The typical resting-state structure consisted of a high-frequency occipito-parietal component of the AR (ARC1) and a low-frequency occipito-temporal component (ARC2), characterized by individual dynamics in time...
August 15, 2017: Scientific Reports
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28810710/testing-convergent-evolution-in-auditory-processing-genes-between-echolocating-mammals-and-the-aye-aye-a-percussive-foraging-primate
#4
Richard J Bankoff, Michael Jerjos, Baily Hohman, M Elise Lauterbur, Logan Kistler, George H Perry
Several taxonomically distinct mammalian groups-certain microbats and cetaceans (e.g., dolphins)-share both morphological adaptations related to echolocation behavior and strong signatures of convergent evolution at the amino acid level across seven genes related to auditory processing. Aye-ayes (Daubentonia madagascariensis) are nocturnal lemurs with a specialized auditory processing system. Aye-ayes tap rapidly along the surfaces of trees, listening to reverberations to identify the mines of wood-boring insect larvae; this behavior has been hypothesized to functionally mimic echolocation...
July 1, 2017: Genome Biology and Evolution
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28810709/parallel-evolution-of-sperm-hyper-activation-ca2-channels
#5
Jacob C Cooper, Nitin Phadnis
Sperm hyper-activation is a dramatic change in sperm behavior where mature sperm burst into a final sprint in the race to the egg. The mechanism of sperm hyper-activation in many metazoans, including humans, consists of a jolt of Ca2+ into the sperm flagellum via CatSper ion channels. Surprisingly, all nine CatSper genes have been independently lost in several animal lineages. In Drosophila, sperm hyper-activation is performed through the cooption of the polycystic kidney disease 2 (pkd2) Ca2+ channel. The parallels between CatSpers in primates and pkd2 in Drosophila provide a unique opportunity to examine the molecular evolution of the sperm hyper-activation machinery in two independent, nonhomologous calcium channels separated by > 500 million years of divergence...
July 1, 2017: Genome Biology and Evolution
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28800678/new-perspectives-on-the-neurophysiology-of-primate-amygdala-emerging-from-the-study-of-naturalistic-social-behaviors
#6
REVIEW
Katalin M Gothard, Clayton P Mosher, Prisca E Zimmerman, Philip T Putnam, Jeremiah K Morrow, Andrew J Fuglevand
A major challenge of primate neurophysiology, particularly in the domain of social neuroscience, is to adopt more natural behaviors without compromising the ability to relate patterns of neural activity to specific actions or sensory inputs. Traditional approaches have identified neural activity patterns in the amygdala in response to simplified versions of social stimuli such as static images of faces. As a departure from this reduced approach, single images of faces were replaced with arrays of images or videos of conspecifics...
August 11, 2017: Wiley Interdisciplinary Reviews. Cognitive Science
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28794192/neural-correlates-for-task-switching-in-the-macaque-superior-colliculus
#7
Jason Lloyd Chan, Michael J Koval, Kevin Johnston, Stefan Everling
Successful task switching requires a network of brain areas to select, maintain, implement, and execute the appropriate task. Although frontoparietal brain areas are thought to play a critical role in task switching by selecting and encoding task rules and exerting top-down control, how brain areas closer to the execution of tasks participate in task switching is unclear. The superior colliculus (SC) integrates information from various brain areas to generate saccades and is likely influenced by task switching...
August 9, 2017: Journal of Neurophysiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28793027/oviposition-behavior-of-haemagogus-leucocelaenus-diptera-culicidae-a-vector-of-wild-yellow-fever-in-brazil
#8
Aline Tátila-Ferreira, Daniele de Aguiar Maia, Filipe Vieira Santos de Abreu, William Costa Rodrigues, Jeronimo Alencar
Haemagogus leucocelaenus, which is considered a major vector of wild yellow fever, exhibits acrodendrophilic habits and mainly deposits its eggs in treeholes and bamboo internodes. The selection of nursery sites is essential in the life history and reproductive success of mosquitoes. The present work investigated the preferred oviposition height and period of Hg. leucocelaenus in an Atlantic forest area in Rio de Janeiro. Sampling was performed using oviposition traps that were placed on plant material at 0, 2, 4, 6, and 8 m above the ground, from August 2015 to July 2016...
August 7, 2017: Revista do Instituto de Medicina Tropical de São Paulo
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28789856/age-related-differences-in-stress-responsiveness-of-the-hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal-axis-of-nonhuman-primates-with-various-types-of-adaptive-behavior
#9
Nadezhda D Goncharova, Tamara E Oganyan
Aging is characterized by disturbances in the functioning of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, associated with disturbances in the adaptation processes and increase of the probability of the onset of post-stress syndrome. However, the individual features of age-related disorders stress reactivity of HPA axis have not been studied. The purpose was to study individual characteristics of the HPA axis responsiveness to acute psycho-emotional stress exposure (restraint, ASE) at different age periods on the model of the young adult and old physically healthy female rhesus monkeys that differ in their behavioral responses to stress, i...
August 5, 2017: General and Comparative Endocrinology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28774750/advances-in-nonhuman-primate-models-of-autism-integrating-neuroscience-and-behavior
#10
REVIEW
M D Bauman, C S Schumann
Given the prevalence and societal impact of autism spectrum disorders (ASD), there is an urgent need to develop innovative preventative strategies and treatments to reduce the alarming number of cases and improve core symptoms for afflicted individuals. Translational efforts between clinical and preclinical research are needed to (i) identify and evaluate putative causes of ASD, (ii) determine the underlying neurobiological mechanisms, (iii) develop and test novel therapeutic approaches and (iv) ultimately translate basic research into safe and effective clinical practices...
July 31, 2017: Experimental Neurology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28769746/triarchic-psychopathy-dimensions-in-chimpanzees-pan-troglodytes-investigating-associations-with-genetic-variation-in-the-vasopressin-receptor-1a-gene
#11
Robert D Latzman, Steven J Schapiro, William D Hopkins
Vasopressin is a neuropeptide known to be associated with the development and evolution of complex socio-emotional behaviors including those relevant to psychopathic personality. In both humans and chimpanzees, recent research suggests a strong genetic contribution to individual variation in psychopathic traits. To date, however, little is known concerning specific genes that might explain the observed heritability of psychopathy. In a relatively large sample of captive chimpanzees (N = 164), the current study thus sought to investigate gene-environment associations between triarchic psychopathy dimensions (i...
2017: Frontiers in Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28768742/multiple-spatial-representations-interact-to-increase-reach-accuracy-when-coordinating-a-saccade-with-a-reach
#12
Yuriria Vazquez, Laura Federici, Bijan Pesaran
Reaching is an essential behavior that allows primates to interact with the environment. Precise reaching to visual targets depends on our ability to localize and foveate the target. Despite this, how the saccade system contributes to improvements in reach accuracy remains poorly understood. To assess spatial contributions of eye movements to reach accuracy, we performed a series of behavioral psychophysics experiments in non-human primates (M. mulatta). We found that a coordinated saccade with a reach to a remembered target location increases reach accuracy without target foveation...
August 2, 2017: Journal of Neurophysiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28763098/cross-species-comparison-of-behavioral-neurodevelopmental-milestones-in-the-common-marmoset-monkey-and-human-child
#13
Karla K Ausderau, Caitlin Dammann, Kathy McManus, Mary Schneider, Marina E Emborg, Nancy Schultz-Darken
The common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus) is an increasingly popular non-human primate species for developing transgenic and genomic edited models of neurological disorders. These models present an opportunity to assess from birth the impact of genetic mutations and to identify candidate predictive biomarkers of early disease onset. In order to apply findings from marmosets to humans, a cross-species comparison of typical development is essential. Aiming to identify similarities, differences, and gaps in knowledge of neurodevelopment, we evaluated peer-reviewed literature focused on the first 6 months of life of marmosets and compared to humans...
August 1, 2017: Developmental Psychobiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28762524/resilience-of-experimentally-seeded-dietary-traditions-in-wild-vervets-evidence-from-group-fissions
#14
Erica van de Waal, Carel P van Schaik, Andrew Whiten
Controlled laboratory experiments have delivered extensive and compelling evidence for the diffusion and maintenance of socially learned behavior in primates and other animals. Such evidence is rarer in the wild, but we show that a behavior seeded in a majority of individuals within vervet monkey (Chlorocebus pygerythus) groups may be sustained across several years. Here, we report results of two natural fission events in such groups that offer novel evidence of the resilience of socially transmitted group norms of behavior...
August 1, 2017: American Journal of Primatology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28756869/converging-prefronto-insula-amygdala-pathways-in-negative-emotion-regulation-in%C3%A2-marmoset-monkeys
#15
Yoshiro Shiba, Lydia Oikonomidis, Stephen Sawiak, Tim D Fryer, Young T Hong, Gemma Cockcroft, Andrea M Santangelo, Angela C Roberts
BACKGROUND: Impaired regulation of emotional responses to potential threat is a core feature of affective disorders. However, while the subcortical circuitry responsible for processing and expression of fear has been well characterized, the top-down control of this circuitry is less well understood. Our recent studies demonstrated that heightened emotionality, as measured both physiologically and behaviorally, during conditioned fear and innate/social threat was induced, independently, by excitotoxic lesions of either the anterior orbitofrontal cortex (antOFC) or ventrolateral prefrontal cortex (vlPFC)...
June 23, 2017: Biological Psychiatry
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28751636/increased-functional-connectivity-after-stroke-correlates-with-behavioral-scores-in-non-human-primate-model
#16
Carlos R Hernandez-Castillo, Joseph Y Nashed, Juan Fernandez-Ruiz, Justin Wang, Jason Gallivan, Douglas J Cook
Here we characterized the functional connectivity (FC) changes occurring after a controlled MCA stroke in a primate model. We hypothesize that if FC can inform about the neural changes after a stroke in the non-human primate (NHP) stroke model, then significant FC changes after the stroke would have to correlate with the remaining behavioral capacities. Eleven cynomolgus monkeys underwent an experimental middle cerebral artery occlusion while five monkeys remained as the control group. One month later the neurological function was assessed with a set of fine motor tasks and the Nonhuman Primate Stroke Scale (NHPSS)...
July 27, 2017: Scientific Reports
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28744207/preference-for-averageness-in-faces-does-not-generalize-to-non-human-primates
#17
Olivia B Tomeo, Leslie G Ungerleider, Ning Liu
Facial attractiveness is a long-standing topic of active study in both neuroscience and social science, motivated by its positive social consequences. Over the past few decades, it has been established that averageness is a major factor influencing judgments of facial attractiveness in humans. Non-human primates share similar social behaviors as well as neural mechanisms related to face processing with humans. However, it is unknown whether monkeys, like humans, also find particular faces attractive and, if so, which kind of facial traits they prefer...
2017: Frontiers in Behavioral Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28739950/coevolution-of-cultural-intelligence-extended-life-history-sociality-and-brain-size-in-primates
#18
Sally E Street, Ana F Navarrete, Simon M Reader, Kevin N Laland
Explanations for primate brain expansion and the evolution of human cognition and culture remain contentious despite extensive research. While multiple comparative analyses have investigated variation in brain size across primate species, very few have addressed why primates vary in how much they use social learning. Here, we evaluate the hypothesis that the enhanced reliance on socially transmitted behavior observed in some primates has coevolved with enlarged brains, complex sociality, and extended lifespans...
July 24, 2017: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28739161/automated-face-recognition-of-rhesus-macaques
#19
Claire L Witham
BACKGROUND: Rhesus macaques are widely used in biomedical research. Automated behavior monitoring can be useful in various studies (including neuroscience), as well as having applications to animal welfare but current technology lags behind that developed for other species. One difficulty facing developers is the reliable identification of individual macaques within a group especially as pair- and group-housing of macaques becomes standard. Current published methods require either implantation or wearing of a tracking device...
July 21, 2017: Journal of Neuroscience Methods
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28738394/the-contribution-of-adult-hippocampal-neurogenesis-to-the-progression-of-psychiatric-disorders
#20
Rachel A Kohman, Justin S Rhodes
New neurons are continuously formed in the adult hippocampus of the human, nonhuman primate, and rodent throughout life though rates of neurogenesis precipitously decline with age to near zero levels at the end of the natural life span. Since its discovery in the 1960s, a large number of studies have documented numerous environmental and genetic factors which regulate adult neurogenesis. Chief among the positive regulators of neurogenesis are exercise and antidepressant drugs. Chief among the negative regulators of neurogenesis besides age are stress and inflammation...
2017: Modern Trends in Pharmacopsychiatry
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