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vaccination delayed

Barbara J Wilson, Laura J Zitella, Colleen H Erb, Jackie Foster, Mary Peterson, Sylvia K Wood
BACKGROUND: Cancer-related infections lead to increases in mortality, antibiotic use, and hospital stays. Other adverse outcomes include dose delays and reductions, which can result in suboptimal treatment outcomes. OBJECTIVES: Effective implementation of risk assessment and evidence-based interventions for the prevention and treatment of infection are essential to improve care and reduce costs related to infections in patients with cancer receiving immunosuppressive therapy...
April 1, 2018: Clinical Journal of Oncology Nursing
Edward E Walsh, Lu Wang, Ann R Falsey, Xing Qiu, Anthony Corbett, Jeanne Holden-Wiltse, Thomas J Mariani, David J Topham, Mary T Caserta
Background: Maternally derived serum antibody and viral load are thought to influence disease severity in primary Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) infection. As part of the AsPIRES study of RSV pathogenesis we correlated various serum antibody concentrations and viral load with disease severity. Methods: Serum neutralizing titers and IgG to RSV F, Ga and Gb proteins, the CX3C region of G, and nasal viral load were measured in 139 full-term previously healthy infants with primary RSV infection and correlated with illness severity...
March 13, 2018: Journal of Infectious Diseases
Larisa J Geskin, James J Damiano, Christina C Patrone, Lisa H Butterfield, John M Kirkwood, Louis D Falo
In the current era of checkpoint inhibitors, some patients with metastatic melanoma have shown a significant improvement in survival. However, optimization of immunotherapy is an ongoing effort. Monocyte-derived dendritic cell (MODC) vaccines have been shown in clinical trials to be safe and capable of inducing tumor-specific immunity as well as occasional objective clinical responses. Here, we conducted a three-arm pilot clinical study in 15 patients with metastatic melanoma to evaluate three types of MODC vaccines, differing only by strategies of tumor antigen delivery...
March 14, 2018: Melanoma Research
Etienne Gignoux, Jonathan Polonsky, Iza Ciglenecki, Mathieu Bichet, Matthew Coldiron, Enoch Thuambe Lwiyo, Innocent Akonda, Micaela Serafini, Klaudia Porten
In 2013, a large measles epidemic occurred in the Aketi Health Zone of the Democratic Republic of Congo. We conducted a two-stage, retrospective cluster survey to estimate the attack rate, the case fatality rate, and the measles-specific mortality rate during the epidemic. 1424 households containing 7880 individuals were included. The estimated attack rate was 14.0%, (35.0% among children aged <5 years). The estimated case fatality rate was 4.2% (6.1% among children aged <5 years). Spatial analysis and linear regression showed that younger children, those who did not receive care, and those living farther away from Aketi Hospital early in the epidemic had a higher risk of measles related death...
2018: PloS One
Ricardo A Orbegozo-Medina, Victoria Martínez-Sernández, Marta González-Warleta, José Antonio Castro-Hermida, Mercedes Mezo, Florencio M Ubeira
Fasciolosis continues to be a major cause of economic losses in the livestock industry and a growing threat to humans. The limited spectrum of effective anthelmintics and the appearance of resistances urge the need for developing an effective vaccine. Most studies have been focused on the use of TH1 -polarizing adjuvants and the use of recombinant Fasciola critical molecules and, despite the efforts, no reproducible protections have been achieved. The F. hepatica MF6p/FhHDM-1 protein is a heme-binding protein also reported to have immunomodulatory properties, constituting a promising target for vaccination and/or as target for the development of new flukicides...
March 8, 2018: Vaccine
Eva Herweijer, Alexander Ploner, Pär Sparén
BACKGROUND: Between 2007 and 2011, opportunistic HPV-vaccination was available in Sweden and partially subsidized to girls aged 13-17, reaching a ∼30% overall coverage. METHODS: All Swedish women/men aged 15-44 were followed between 2006 and 2012 for condyloma. Average annual percent changes (AAPCs) in incidence were estimated. RESULTS: Substantial decreases were seen in women aged 15-24 from 2008-onwards (AACP-range: -8.5% to -18.5%); similar effects were seen for men aged 15-29 (AACP-range: -7...
March 6, 2018: Vaccine
Luca Ferrari, Elena Canelli, Elena De Angelis, Alessia Catella, Giulia Ferrarini, Giulia Ogno, Luca Bonati, Roberto Nardini, Paolo Borghetti, Paolo Martelli
Highly pathogenic (HP) PRRSV isolates have been discovered within both PRRSV-1 and PRRSV-2 genotypes and investigated in recent years especially for their ability to cause extremely severe disease in conventional pig herds. The exacerbation of general and respiratory clinical signs has been attributed not only to an efficient replication (virulence) but also to the ability to dysregulate viral recognition and induce mechanisms of immune evasion or immune enhancement of humoral and cellular anti-viral responses differently from non-HP PRRSV isolates in terms of intensity and temporal onset...
March 2018: Veterinary Microbiology
Céline Deblanc, Séverine Hervé, Stéphane Gorin, Charlie Cador, Mathieu Andraud, Stéphane Quéguiner, Nicolas Barbier, Frédéric Paboeuf, Nicolas Rose, Gaëlle Simon
Maternally-derived antibodies (MDA) reduce piglet susceptibility to swine influenza A virus, but interfere with post-infectious immune responses, raising questions about protection after waning of passive immunity. We therefore analysed the impact of different levels of residual MDA on virus excretion and immune responses in piglets born to vaccinated sows (MDA+) and infected with H1N1 at 5, 7 or 11 weeks of age, in comparison to piglets born to unvaccinated sows (MDA-). Subsequent protection against a second homologous infection occurring 4 weeks after the primo-infection was also investigated...
March 2018: Veterinary Microbiology
Mark R Armstrong, Kate L McCarthy, Robert L Horvath
BACKGROUND: Coxiella burnetii endocarditis can be difficult to diagnose leading to delays in treatment. This retrospective case series study was undertaken to understand the epidemiologic trends and clinical features of Q fever endocarditis in Southeast Queensland, Australia. METHODS: Clinical records of patients from a single center with coding diagnosis of C. burnetii, or serology consistent with chronic Q fever, were reviewed from 1999 to 2015. Data from patients with probable or confirmed Q fever endocarditis was abstracted...
March 8, 2018: Infectious Diseases
A Klin, W Jones
The future of neurodevelopmental medicine has the potential of situating child neurology at the forefront of a broad-based public health effort to optimize neurodevelopmental outcomes of children born with high-prevalence and diverse genetic, pre- and peri-natal, and environmental burdens compromising early brain development and leading to lifetime disabilities. Building on advancements in developmental social neuroscience and in implementation science, this shift is already occurring in the case of emblematic neurodevelopmental disorders such as autism...
March 1, 2018: Revista de Neurologia
Lingshu Wang, Wei Shi, James D Chappell, M Gordon Joyce, Yi Zhang, Masaru Kanekiyo, Michelle M Becker, Neeltje van Doremalen, Robert Fischer, Nianshuang Wang, Kizzmekia S Corbett, Misook Choe, Rosemarie D Mason, Joseph G Van Galen, Tongqing Zhou, Kevin O Saunders, Kathleen M Tatti, Lia M Haynes, Peter D Kwong, Kayvon Modjarrad, Wing-Pui Kong, Jason S McLellan, Mark R Denison, Vincent J Munster, John R Mascola, Barney S Graham
Middle East Respiratory Syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) causes a highly lethal pulmonary infection with ∼35% mortality. The potential for a future pandemic originating from animal reservoirs or healthcare-associated events is a major public health concern. There are no vaccines or therapeutic agents currently available for MERS-CoV. Using a probe-based single B cell-cloning strategy, we have identified and characterized multiple neutralizing mAbs specifically binding to the receptor binding domain (RBD) or S1 (non-RBD) regions from a convalescent MERS-CoV-infected patient and from immunized rhesus macaques...
March 7, 2018: Journal of Virology
Anna E Schager, C Coral Dominguez-Medina, Francesca Necchi, Francesca Micoli, Yun Shan Goh, Margaret Goodall, Adriana Flores-Langarica, Saeeda Bobat, Charlotte N L Cook, Melissa Arcuri, Arianna Marini, Lloyd D W King, Faye C Morris, Graham Anderson, Kai-Michael Toellner, Ian R Henderson, Constantino López-Macías, Calman A MacLennan, Adam F Cunningham
Antibodies acquired after vaccination or natural infection with Gram-negative bacteria, such as invasive Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, can protect against disease. Immunization with naturally shed outer membrane vesicles from Gram-negative bacteria is being studied for its potential to protect against many infections, since antigens within vesicles maintain their natural conformation and orientation. Shedding can be enhanced through genetic modification, and the resulting particles, generalized modules for membrane antigens (GMMA), not only offer potential as vaccines but also can facilitate the study of B-cell responses to bacterial antigens...
March 6, 2018: MBio
Robert O Dillman, Andrew N Cornforth, Gabriel I Nistor, Edward F McClay, Thomas T Amatruda, Carol Depriest
BACKGROUND: Despite improved survival following checkpoint inhibitors, there is still a potential role for anti-cancer therapeutic vaccines. Because of biological heterogeneity and neoantigens resulting from each patient's mutanome, autologous tumor may be the best source of tumor-associated antigens (TAA) for vaccines. Ex vivo loading of autologous dendritic cells with TAA may be associated with superior clinical outcome compared to injecting irradiated autologous tumor cells. We conducted a randomized phase II trial to compare autologous tumor cell vaccines (TCV) and autologous dendritic cell vaccines (DCV) loaded with autologous TAA...
March 6, 2018: Journal for Immunotherapy of Cancer
Alberto Donzelli, Vittorio Demicheli
The Italian Parliament has recently introduced 10 mandatory immunisations, including the one against varicella. For this vaccination, the obligation starts with the birth cohort of 2017, but it is offered free of charge to subjects with a negative history and not previously vaccinated. This paper presents up-to-date evidence on this issue and illustrates a number of critical arguments that may question the opportunity of this choice. Particularly, while the disease is relatively mild in children aged between 1 and 9 years, the risk of worsening its consequences is progressive with age, becoming worst in the elderly, so the vaccination of children may increase the age of the cases...
January 2018: Epidemiologia e Prevenzione
Frederick Chen
A simple dynamic model of vaccination is presented and analyzed to study how the amount of vaccines available affects people's vaccination decisions. In addition, the model is used to examine how the level of vaccination in equilibrium compares to the efficient or socially optimal level. It is shown that, when the stock of vaccines is large so that a shortage could never arise, an equilibrium is generically unique, and there is too little vaccination compared to the social optimum. When the stock of vaccines is small so that not everyone in a population could get vaccinated, a shortage could occur in equilibrium...
March 1, 2018: Journal of Theoretical Biology
Marie J Ducrotoy, Pilar M Muñoz, Raquel Conde-Álvarez, José M Blasco, Ignacio Moriyón
Brucellosis is a worldwide extended zoonosis with a heavy economic and public health impact. Cattle, sheep and goats are infected by smooth Brucella abortus and Brucella melitensis, and represent a common source of the human disease. Brucellosis diagnosis in these animals is largely based on detection of a specific immunoresponse. We review here the immunological tests used for the diagnosis of cattle brucellosis. First, we discuss how the diagnostic sensitivity (DSe) and specificity (DSp), balance should be adjusted for brucellosis diagnosis, and the difficulties that brucellosis tests specifically present for the estimation of DSe/DSp in frequentistic (gold standard) and Bayesian analyses...
March 1, 2018: Preventive Veterinary Medicine
Birkneh Tilahun Tadesse, Byron Alexander Foster, Mulugeta Sitot Shibeshi, Henok Tadele Dangiso
Background: Bacterial meningitis is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in the developing world. However, limited research has focused on the diagnosis and management of meningitis in resource-limited settings. Methods: We designed a prospective case series of children admitted to a large, academic referral hospital with acute meningitis syndrome. Data were collected on age, time of presentation, prior antibiotics, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) parameters, antibiotic and steroid prescription, and clinical outcome...
November 2017: Ethiopian Journal of Health Sciences
Flavio Finger, Enrico Bertuzzo, Francisco J Luquero, Nathan Naibei, Brahima Touré, Maya Allan, Klaudia Porten, Justin Lessler, Andrea Rinaldo, Andrew S Azman
BACKGROUND: Cholera prevention and control interventions targeted to neighbors of cholera cases (case-area targeted interventions [CATIs]), including improved water, sanitation, and hygiene, oral cholera vaccine (OCV), and prophylactic antibiotics, may be able to efficiently avert cholera cases and deaths while saving scarce resources during epidemics. Efforts to quickly target interventions to neighbors of cases have been made in recent outbreaks, but little empirical evidence related to the effectiveness, efficiency, or ideal design of this approach exists...
February 2018: PLoS Medicine
Julie Liao, Daniel R Smith, Jóhanna Brynjarsdóttir, Paula I Watnick
Diarrhea is the most common infection in children under the age of five worldwide. In spite of this, only a few vaccines to treat infectious diarrhea exist, and many of the available vaccines are sparingly and sporadically administered. Major obstacles to the development and widespread implementation of vaccination include the ease and cost of production, distribution, and delivery. Here we present a novel, customizable and self-assembling vaccine platform that exploits the Vibrio cholerae bacterial biofilm matrix for antigen presentation...
February 26, 2018: Journal of Bacteriology
Nirupama Bonthala, Sunanda Kane
PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Inflammatory bowel disease affects approximately 800,000 women in the USA with the peak incidence between ages 15 to 40. Thus for many females, IBD can impact nearly every stage of their life from menarche to pregnancy, menopause, and beyond. This paper will review the most recent updates on the topics of sexual health, cervical cancer screening, menstruation, fertility, contraception, and menopause. RECENT FINDINGS: Menarche can be delayed in females especially those who are underweight, malnourished, or with active inflammatory bowel disease...
February 26, 2018: Current Treatment Options in Gastroenterology
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