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Neuromuscular junction proteines

Paul Strecker, Susann Ludewig, Marco Rust, Tabea A Mundinger, Andreas Görlich, Elisa G Krächan, Christina Mehrfeld, Joachim Herz, Martin Korte, Suzanne Y Guénette, Stefan Kins
The FE65 adaptor proteins (FE65, FE65L1 and FE65L2) bind proteins that function in diverse cellular pathways and are essential for specific biological processes. Mice lacking both FE65 and FE65L1 exhibit ectopic neuronal positioning in the cortex and muscle weakness. p97FE65-KO mice, expressing a shorter FE65 isoform able to bind amyloid precursor protein family members (APP, APLP1, APLP2), develop defective long-term potentiation (LTP) and aged mice display spatial learning and memory deficits that are absent from young mice...
May 11, 2016: Scientific Reports
Franziska Wild, Muzamil Majid Khan, Tatjana Straka, Rüdiger Rudolf
Endocytosed nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (CHRN) are degraded via macroautophagy/autophagy during atrophic conditions and are accompanied by the autophagic regulator protein SH3GLB1. The present study addressed the functional role of SH3GLB1 on CHRN trafficking and its implementation. We found an augmented ratio of total SH3GLB1 to threonine-145 phosphorylated SH3GLB1 (SH3GLB1:p-SH3GLB1) under conditions of increased CHRN vesicle numbers. Overexpression of T145 phosphomimetic (T145E) and phosphodeficient (T145A) mutants of SH3GLB1, were found to either slow down or augment the processing of endocytic CHRN vesicles, respectively...
October 7, 2016: Autophagy
Rachel M McQuade, Simona E Carbone, Vanesa Stojanovska, Ahmed Rahman, Rachel M Gwynne, Ainsley M Robinson, Craig A Goodman, Joel C Bornstein, Kulmira Nurgali
BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Oxaliplatin is a platinum-based chemotherapeutic drug used as a first-line therapy for colorectal cancer. However, its use is associated with severe gastrointestinal side-effects resulting in dose limitations and/or cessation of treatment. In this study, we tested whether oxidative stress, caused by chronic oxaliplatin treatment, induces enteric neuronal damage and colonic dysmotility EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH: Oxaliplatin (3 mg/kg/d) was administered in vivo to Balb/c mice intraperitoneally three times a week...
October 7, 2016: British Journal of Pharmacology
Jennifer L Krill, Ken Dawson-Scully
While the mammalian brain functions within a very narrow range of oxygen concentrations and temperatures, the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, has employed strategies to deal with a much wider range of acute environmental stressors. The foraging (for) gene encodes the cGMP-dependent protein kinase (PKG), has been shown to regulate thermotolerance in many stress-adapted species, including Drosophila, and could be a potential therapeutic target in the treatment of hyperthermia in mammals. Whereas previous thermotolerance studies have looked at the effects of PKG variation on Drosophila behavior or excitatory postsynaptic potentials at the neuromuscular junction (NMJ), little is known about PKG effects on presynaptic mechanisms...
2016: PloS One
Daniel B Drachman
The basic abnormality in myasthenia gravis (MG) is a reduction in acetylcholine receptors (AChRs) at neuromuscular junctions due to the effects of autoantibodies that are directed against the AChRs in most patients, or against neighboring proteins involved in the clustering of AChRs (MuSK, LRP-4, or agrin). Clinically, MG is characterized by muscle weakness and fatigue, often in typical patterns. The diagnosis may be missed early, and depends on the recognition of clinical manifestations, the measurement of autoantibodies, and/or electrophysiological features...
October 2016: Seminars in Neurology
Masayuki Homma, Akiyuki Uzawa, Hitoshi Tanaka, Naoki Kawaguchi, Tetsuya Kanai, Kenji Nakajima, Masakuni Narita, Yukio Hara, Hideya Maruyama, Yasumasa Ogawa, Keiichi Himuro, Satoshi Kuwabara
Most patients with myasthenia gravis (MG) have elevated levels of autoantibodies against the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (AChR) at the neuromuscular junction, which leads to muscle weakness. We developed a fusion protein, AChR-Fc, as a novel therapeutic biomolecule for patients with MG and examined its efficacy. AChR-Fc was expressed by Chinese hamster ovary cells and purified. We examined the neutralizing activity and cellular cytotoxicity of AChR-Fc using anti-AChR antibody-producing hybridoma cells and serum samples from 16 patients with MG...
September 27, 2016: Neurotherapeutics: the Journal of the American Society for Experimental NeuroTherapeutics
Seung-Hyun Lee, Yoon-Jung Kim, Se-Young Choi
The structure and function of synapses is modulated by the interaction of presynaptic and postsynaptic neurons via cell adhesion molecules or secreted signal molecules. Bone morphogenic protein (BMP) is a secreted molecule mediating retrograde signaling that is involved in the formation and maintenance of synaptic structure throughout many animal species. However, how BMP signaling modulates presynaptic neurotransmitter release is not yet clear. We studied the function of BMP signaling factors in neurotransmitter release in Drosophila neuromuscular synapses using loss-of-function mutants in genes for BMP modulators, Wit, Mad, and Dad...
October 21, 2016: Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications
Chengzu Long, Leonela Amoasii, Rhonda Bassel-Duby, Eric N Olson
Importance: Muscle weakness, the most common symptom of neuromuscular disease, may result from muscle dysfunction or may be caused indirectly by neuronal and neuromuscular junction abnormalities. To date, more than 780 monogenic neuromuscular diseases, linked to 417 different genes, have been identified in humans. Genome-editing methods, especially the CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats)-Cas9 (CRISPR-associated protein 9) system, hold clinical potential for curing many monogenic disorders, including neuromuscular diseases such as Duchenne muscular dystrophy, spinal muscular atrophy, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and myotonic dystrophy type 1...
September 26, 2016: JAMA Neurology
Alejandro M Gomez, Jo A A Stevens, Marina Mané-Damas, Peter Molenaar, Hans Duimel, Fons Verheyen, Judith Cossins, David Beeson, Marc H De Baets, Mario Losen, Pilar Martinez-Martinez
Myasthenia gravis (MG) is an autoimmune disease mediated by autoantibodies that target proteins at the neuromuscular junction, primarily the acetylcholine receptor (AChR) and the muscle-specific kinase. Because downstream of kinase 7 (Dok-7) is essential for the full activation of muscle-specific kinase and consequently for dense clustering of AChRs, we hypothesized that reduced levels of Dok-7 increase the susceptibility to passive transfer MG. To test this hypothesis, Dok-7 expression was reduced by transfecting shRNA-coding plasmids into the tibialis anterior muscle of adult rats by in vivo electroporation...
October 2016: American Journal of Pathology
Hongxia Liu, Andrew S French, Päivi H Torkkeli
The spider, Cupiennius salei, central and peripheral nervous system transcriptomes have 15 Cys-loop receptor subunits and an acetylcholine binding protein (AChBP). Twelve subunits are predicted to form anion channels gated by γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA), glutamate, histamine or changes in pH, and three are putative ACh gated cation channels. Spiders have a variety of mechanosensilla and proprioceptive organs that are innervated by efferents in their peripherally located parts, and efferents also innervate muscle fibers...
September 21, 2016: Journal of Comparative Neurology
Andrew G Engel, Duygu Selcen, Xin-Ming Shen, Margherita Milone, C Michel Harper
OBJECTIVE: To identify the molecular basis of a fatal syndrome of microcephaly, cortical hyperexcitability, and myasthenia. METHODS: We performed clinical and in vitro microelectrode studies of neuromuscular transmission, examined neuromuscular junctions cytochemically and by electron microscopy (EM), and searched for mutations by Sanger and exome sequencing. RESULTS: Neuromuscular transmission was severely compromised by marked depletion of the readily releasable pool of quanta, but the probability of quantal release was normal...
October 2016: Neurology. Genetics
Francesco Curcio, Gaetana Ferro, Claudia Basile, Ilaria Liguori, Paolo Parrella, Flora Pirozzi, David Della-Morte, Gaetano Gargiulo, Gianluca Testa, Carlo Gabriele Tocchetti, Domenico Bonaduce, Pasquale Abete
The slow and continuous loss of muscle mass that progresses with aging is defined as "sarcopenia". Sarcopenia represents an important public health problem, being closely linked to a condition of frailty and, therefore, of disability. According to the European Working Group on Sarcopenia in Older People, the diagnosis of sarcopenia requires the presence of low muscle mass, along with either low grip strength or low physical performance. However, age-related changes in skeletal muscle can be largely attributed to the complex interactions among factors including alterations of the neuromuscular junction, endocrine system, growth factors, and muscle proteins turnover, behavior-related and disease-related factors...
September 12, 2016: Experimental Gerontology
Suzan M Hammond, Gareth Hazell, Fazel Shabanpoor, Amer F Saleh, Melissa Bowerman, James N Sleigh, Katharina E Meijboom, Haiyan Zhou, Francesco Muntoni, Kevin Talbot, Michael J Gait, Matthew J A Wood
The development of antisense oligonucleotide therapy is an important advance in the identification of corrective therapy for neuromuscular diseases, such as spinal muscular atrophy (SMA). Because of difficulties of delivering single-stranded oligonucleotides to the CNS, current approaches have been restricted to using invasive intrathecal single-stranded oligonucleotide delivery. Here, we report an advanced peptide-oligonucleotide, Pip6a-morpholino phosphorodiamidate oligomer (PMO), which demonstrates potent efficacy in both the CNS and peripheral tissues in severe SMA mice following systemic administration...
September 27, 2016: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Atilgan Yilmaz, Chandramohan Kattamuri, Rana N Ozdeslik, Carolyn Schmiedel, Sarah Mentzer, Christoph Schorl, Elena Oancea, Thomas B Thompson, Justin R Fallon
Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) function in most tissues but have cell type-specific effects. Given the relatively small number of BMP receptors, this exquisite signaling specificity requires additional molecules to regulate this pathway's output. The receptor tyrosine kinase MuSK (muscle-specific kinase) is critical for neuromuscular junction formation and maintenance. Here, we show that MuSK also promotes BMP signaling in muscle cells. MuSK bound to BMP4 and related BMPs with low nanomolar affinity in vitro and to the type I BMP receptors ALK3 and ALK6 in a ligand-independent manner both in vitro and in cultured myotubes...
2016: Science Signaling
Hidemi Misawa, Daijiro Inomata, Miseri Kikuchi, Sae Maruyama, Yasuhiro Moriwaki, Takashi Okuda, Nobuyuki Nukina, Tomoyuki Yamanaka
VAChT-Cre.Fast and VAChT-Cre.Slow mice selectively express Cre recombinase in approximately one half of post-natal somatic motor neurons. The mouse lines have been used in various studies with selective genetic modifications in adult motor neurons. In the present study, we crossed VAChT-Cre lines with a reporter line, CAG-Syp/tdTomato, in which synaptophysin-tdTomato fusion proteins are efficiently sorted to axon terminals, making it possible to label both cell bodies and axon terminals of motor neurons. In the mice, Syp/tdTomato fluorescence preferentially co-localized with osteopontin, a recently discovered motor neuron marker for slow-twitch fatigue-resistant (S) and fast-twitch fatigue-resistant (FR) types...
September 6, 2016: Genesis: the Journal of Genetics and Development
I Matak, Z Lacković, M Relja
In the motor system, botulinum toxin type A (BoNT/A) actions were classically attributed to its well-known peripheral anticholinergic actions in neuromuscular junctions. However, the enzymatic activity of BoNT/A, assessed by the detection of cleaved synaptosomal-associated protein 25 (SNAP-25), was recently detected in motor and sensory regions of the brainstem and spinal cord after toxin peripheral injection in rodents. In sensory regions, the function of BoNT/A activity is associated with its antinociceptive effects, while in motor regions we only know that BoNT/A activity is present...
September 1, 2016: Journal of Neural Transmission
César Astorga, Ramón A Jorquera, Mauricio Ramírez, Andrés Kohler, Estefanía López, Ricardo Delgado, Alex Córdova, Patricio Olguín, Jimena Sierralta
The DLG-MAGUK subfamily of proteins plays a role on the recycling and clustering of glutamate receptors (GLUR) at the postsynaptic density. discs-large1 (dlg) is the only DLG-MAGUK gene in Drosophila and originates two main products, DLGA and DLGS97 which differ by the presence of an L27 domain. Combining electrophysiology, immunostaining and genetic manipulation at the pre and postsynaptic compartments we study the DLG contribution to the basal synaptic-function at the Drosophila larval neuromuscular junction...
2016: Scientific Reports
Katherine R Nesler, Emily L Starke, Nathan G Boin, Matthew Ritz, Scott A Barbee
Spaced synaptic depolarization induces rapid axon terminal growth and the formation of new synaptic boutons at the Drosophila larval neuromuscular junction (NMJ). Here, we identify a novel presynaptic function for the Calcium/Calmodulin-dependent Kinase II (CamKII) protein in the control of activity-dependent synaptic growth. Consistent with this function, we find that both total and phosphorylated CamKII (p-CamKII) are enriched in axon terminals. Interestingly, p-CamKII appears to be enriched at the presynaptic axon terminal membrane...
October 2016: Molecular and Cellular Neurosciences
Mehdi Eshraghi, Emily McFall, Sabrina Gibeault, Rashmi Kothary
Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is caused by mutations or deletions in the Survival Motor Neuron 1 (SMN1) gene in humans. Modifiers of the SMA symptoms have been identified and genetic background has a substantial effect in the phenotype and survival of the severe mouse model of SMA. Previously, we generated the less severe Smn(2B/-) mice on a mixed genetic background. To assess the phenotype of Smn deficiency on a pure genetic background, we produced Smn(2B/2B) congenic mice on either the C57BL/6 (BL6) or FVB strain background and characterized them at the 6(th) generation by breeding to Smn(+/-) mice...
August 18, 2016: Human Molecular Genetics
Mugdha Deshpande, Zachary Feiger, Amanda K Shilton, Christina C Luo, Ethan Silverman, Avital A Rodal
TAR DNA-binding protein 43 (TDP-43) is genetically and functionally linked to amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and regulates transcription, splicing, and transport of thousands of RNA targets that function in diverse cellular pathways. In ALS, pathologically altered TDP-43 is believed to lead to disease by toxic gain-of-function effects on RNA metabolism, as well as by sequestering endogenous TDP-43 and causing its loss of function. However, it is unclear which of the numerous cellular processes disrupted downstream of TDP-43 dysfunction lead to neurodegeneration...
October 1, 2016: Molecular Biology of the Cell
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