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Military REBOA

S E van Oostendorp, E C T H Tan, L M G Geeraedts
INTRODUCTION: Exsanguination following trauma is potentially preventable. Extremity tourniquets have been successfully implemented in military and civilian prehospital care. Prehospital control of bleeding from the torso and junctional area's remains challenging but offers a great potential to improve survival rates. This review aims to provide an overview of potential treatment options in both clinical as preclinical state of research on truncal and junctional bleeding. Since many options have been developed for application in the military primarily, translation to the civilian situation is discussed...
2016: Scandinavian Journal of Trauma, Resuscitation and Emergency Medicine
Walter L Biffl, Charles J Fox, Ernest E Moore
The management of patients with exsanguinating torso hemorrhage is challenging. Emergency surgery, with the occasional use of resuscitative thoracotomy for patient in extremis, is the current standard. Recent reports of REBOA (resuscitative endovascular balloon occlusion of the aorta) have led to discussions about changing paradigms in the management of patients in both civilian and military are nas. We submit that broad and liberal application of this technique is premature given the current data and in light of historical experience...
May 2015: Journal of Trauma and Acute Care Surgery
Kira N Long, Robert Houston, J Devin B Watson, Jonathan J Morrison, Todd E Rasmussen, Brandon W Propper, Zachary M Arthurs
BACKGROUND: Noncompressible torso hemorrhage remains an ongoing problem for both military and civilian trauma. Resuscitative endovascular balloon occlusion of the aorta (REBOA) has been characterized as a potentially life-saving maneuver. The objective of this study was to determine the functional outcomes, paraplegia rates, and survival of 60-min balloon occlusion in the proximal and distal thoracic aorta in a porcine model of controlled hemorrhage. METHODS: Swine (Sus scrofa, 70-110 kg) were subjected to class IV hemorrhagic shock and underwent 60 min of REBOA...
January 2015: Annals of Vascular Surgery
Jonathan J Morrison, James D Ross, Todd E Rasmussen, Mark J Midwinter, Jan O Jansen
The control of torso and junctional zone bleeding in combat casualties is particularly challenging because of its noncompressible nature. Resuscitative endovascular balloon occlusion of the aorta (REBOA) has demonstrated promise in translational large animal and early clinical series as an effective resuscitation and hemorrhage control adjunct. However, it is unknown what proportion of combat casualties has an injury pattern and clinical course that is amenable to REBOA deployment. The prospective UK Joint Theatre Trauma Registry was used to retrospectively identify all UK military personnel who has sustained a severe combat injury, defined as an Abbreviated Injury Scale of three or greater, in the course of 10 years...
May 2014: Shock
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