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climate change human health impacts

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28092757/climate-change-threats-to-family-farmers-sense-of-place-and-mental-wellbeing-a-case-study-from-the-western-australian-wheatbelt
#1
Neville R Ellis, Glenn A Albrecht
'Sense of place' has become a central concept in the analysis of the cultural, personal and mental health risks posed by a changing climate. However, such place-related understandings of mental health and wellbeing remain largely limited to Indigenous health contexts. In this article we argue the relevance of sense of place in understanding the mental health impacts of climate change on family farmers who retain close living and working relationships to the land. We conducted a community-based qualitative case study located in the Western Australian Wheatbelt - a region that has experienced some of the most significant climate change in Australia...
January 6, 2017: Social Science & Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28073526/prevalence-of-algal-toxins-in-alaskan-marine-mammals-foraging-in-a-changing-arctic-and-subarctic-environment
#2
Kathi A Lefebvre, Lori Quakenbush, Elizabeth Frame, Kathy Burek Huntington, Gay Sheffield, Raphaela Stimmelmayr, Anna Bryan, Preston Kendrick, Heather Ziel, Tracey Goldstein, Jonathan A Snyder, Tom Gelatt, Frances Gulland, Bobette Dickerson, Verena Gill
Current climate trends resulting in rapid declines in sea ice and increasing water temperatures are likely to expand the northern geographic range and duration of favorable conditions for harmful algal blooms (HABs), making algal toxins a growing concern in Alaskan marine food webs. Two of the most common HAB toxins along the west coast of North America are the neurotoxins domoic acid (DA) and saxitoxin (STX). Over the last 20 years, DA toxicosis has caused significant illness and mortality in marine mammals along the west coast of the USA, but has not been reported to impact marine mammals foraging in Alaskan waters...
May 2016: Harmful Algae
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28051192/global-warming-and-its-health-impact
#3
Antonella Rossati
Since the mid-19th century, human activities have increased greenhouse gases such as carbon dioxide, methane, and nitrous oxide in the Earth's atmosphere that resulted in increased average temperature. The effects of rising temperature include soil degradation, loss of productivity of agricultural land, desertification, loss of biodiversity, degradation of ecosystems, reduced fresh-water resources, acidification of the oceans, and the disruption and depletion of stratospheric ozone. All these have an impact on human health, causing non-communicable diseases such as injuries during natural disasters, malnutrition during famine, and increased mortality during heat waves due to complications in chronically ill patients...
January 2017: International Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28031695/mitigating-climate-change-at-the-carbon-water-nexus-a-call-to-action-for-the-environmental-engineering-community
#4
Andres F Clarens, Catherine A Peters
Environmental engineers have played a critical role in improving human and ecosystem health over the past several decades. These contributions have focused on providing clean water and air as well as managing waste streams and remediating polluted sites. As environmental problems have become more global in scale and more deeply entrenched in sociotechnical systems, the discipline of environmental engineering must grow to be ready to respond to the challenges of the coming decades. Here we make the case that environmental engineers should play a leadership role in the development of climate change mitigation technologies at the carbon-water nexus (CWN)...
October 1, 2016: Environmental Engineering Science
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28011805/climate-change-and-human-health-what-are-the-research-trends-a-scoping-review-protocol
#5
Niamh Herlihy, Avner Bar-Hen, Glenn Verner, Helen Fischer, Rainer Sauerborn, Anneliese Depoux, Antoine Flahault, Stefanie Schütte
INTRODUCTION: For 28 years, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) has been assessing the potential risks associated with anthropogenic climate change. Although interest in climate change and health is growing, the implications arising from their interaction remain understudied. Generating a greater understanding of the health impacts of climate change could be key step in inciting some of the changes necessary to decelerate global warming. A long-term and broad overview of the existing scientific literature in the field of climate change and health is currently missing in order to ensure that all priority areas are being adequately addressed...
December 23, 2016: BMJ Open
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28009103/experts-perceptions-on-china-s-capacity-to-manage-emerging-and-re-emerging-zoonotic-diseases-in-an-era-of-climate-change
#6
A Hansen, J Xiang, Q Liu, M X Tong, Y Sun, X Liu, K Chen, S Cameron, S Hanson-Easey, G-S Han, P Weinstein, C Williams, P Bi
Zoonotic diseases transmitted by arthropods and rodents are a major public health concern in China. However, interventions in recent decades have helped lower the incidence of several diseases despite the country's large, frequently mobile population and socio-economic challenges. Increasing globalization, rapid urbanization and a warming climate now add to the complexity of disease control and prevention and could challenge China's capacity to respond to threats of emerging and re-emerging zoonoses. To investigate this notion, face-to-face interviews were conducted with 30 infectious disease experts in four cities in China...
December 23, 2016: Zoonoses and Public Health
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28008371/mindful-climate-action-health-and-environmental-co-benefits-from-mindfulness-based-behavioral-training
#7
Bruce Barrett, Maggie Grabow, Cathy Middlecamp, Margaret Mooney, Mary M Checovich, Alexander K Converse, Bob Gillespie, Julia Yates
Greenhouse gases from human activities are causing climate change, creating risks for people around the globe. Behaviors involving transportation, diet, energy use, and purchasing drive greenhouse gas emissions, but are also related to health and well-being, providing opportunity for co-benefits. Replacing shorter automobile trips with walking or cycling, or eating plants rather than animals, for example, may increase personal health, while also reducing environmental impact. Mindfulness-based practices have been shown to enhance a variety of health outcomes, but have not been adapted towards environmental purposes...
October 2016: Sustainability
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27993762/smartphone-apps-for-measuring-human-health-and-climate-change-co-benefits-a-comparison-and-quality-rating-of-available-apps
#8
Rachel K Sullivan, Samantha Marsh, Jakob Halvarsson, Michelle Holdsworth, Wilma Waterlander, Maartje P Poelman, Jennifer Ann Salmond, Hayley Christian, Lenny Sc Koh, Janet E Cade, John C Spence, Alistair Woodward, Ralph Maddison
BACKGROUND: Climate change and the burden of noncommunicable diseases are major global challenges. Opportunities exist to investigate health and climate change co-benefits through a shift from motorized to active transport (walking and cycling) and a shift in dietary patterns away from a globalized diet to reduced consumption of meat and energy dense foods. Given the ubiquitous use and proliferation of smartphone apps, an opportunity exists to use this technology to capture individual travel and dietary behavior and the associated impact on the environment and health...
December 19, 2016: JMIR MHealth and UHealth
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27988975/response-of-vegetation-phenology-to-urbanization-in-the-conterminous-united-states
#9
Xuecao Li, Yuyu Zhou, Ghassem R Asrar, Jiafu Mao, Xiaoma Li, Wenyu Li
The influence of urbanization on vegetation phenology is gaining considerable attention due to its implications for human health, cycling of carbon and other nutrients in Earth system. In this study, we examined the relationship between change in vegetation phenology and urban size, an indicator of urbanization, for the conterminous United States. We studied more than 4500 urban clusters of varying size to determine the impact of urbanization on plant phenology, with the aids of remotely sensed observations since 2003-2012...
December 18, 2016: Global Change Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27974141/new-approaches-in-human-health-risk-assessment
#10
Khaled Abass, Anders Carlsen, Arja Rautio
Studies on the precise impact of environmental pollutants on human health are difficult to undertake and interpret, because many genetic and environmental factors influence health at the same time and to varying degrees. Our chapter in the AMAP report was based on new approaches to describe risks and future needs. In this paper, we will introduce the issues associated with risk assessment of single chemicals, and present suggestions for future studies as well as a summary of lessons learned during the health-related parts of the European Union-funded FP7 project ArcRisk (Arctic Health Risks: Impacts on health in the Arctic and Europe owing to climate-induced changes in contaminant cycling, 2009-2014; www...
2016: International Journal of Circumpolar Health
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27924528/mycotoxins-an-underhand-food-problem
#11
Antonio Moretti, Antonio F Logrieco, Antonia Susca
Among the food safety issues, the occurrence of fungal species able to produce toxic metabolites on the agro-food products has acquired a general attention. These compounds, the mycotoxins, generally provided of low molecular weight, are the result of the secondary metabolism of the toxigenic fungi. They may have toxic activity toward the plants, but mostly represent a serious risk for human and animal health worldwide, since they can be accumulated on many final crop products and they have a broad range of toxic biological activities...
2017: Methods in Molecular Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27894161/climate-and-season-the-effects-on-ophthalmic-diseases
#12
REVIEW
Ayub Qassim, Mthulisi Viki, Soo Khai Ng, Hubertus Jersmann, Robert J Casson
Seasonal changes and climate have a significant impact on human health. Diseases influenced by temperature and climate conditions are likely to undergo dynamic pattern shifts with consequent impact on human health. A number of infectious and non-infectious ophthalmic diseases are influenced by temperature and seasonality. Awareness of this is important from public and global health perspective in addition to resource allocation strategies. We examine the evidence for a seasonal pattern to ophthalmic diseases and assess the possible impact of climate change...
November 28, 2016: Clinical & Experimental Ophthalmology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27889086/impacts-of-regional-transport-on-black-carbon-in-huairou-beijing-china
#13
Yuqin Wang, Benjamin de Foy, James J Schauer, Michael R Olson, Yang Zhang, Zhengqiang Li, Yuanxun Zhang
The 22(nd) Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) Conference was held near Yanqi Lake, Huairou, in Beijing, China during November 10-11, 2014. To guarantee haze-free days during the APEC Conference, the Beijing government and the governments of the surrounding provinces implemented a series of controls. Three months of Aethalometer 880 nm black carbon (BC) measurements were examined to understand the hourly fluctuations in BC concentrations that resulted from emission controls and meteorology changes. Measurements were collected at the University of Chinese Academy of Sciences near the APEC Conference site and in Central Beijing at the Institute of Remote Sensing and Digital Earth of the Chinese Academy of Sciences...
February 2017: Environmental Pollution
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27886592/the-intersection-of-climate-environment-food-nutrition-and-health-crisis-and-opportunity
#14
REVIEW
Daniel J Raiten, Ashley M Aimone
Climate/environmental change (C-E-C) is affecting human health and quality of life. Significant attention has been given to the impact of C-E-C on food supply, and food as a vehicle for exposure. However, C-E-C has been superimposed on prevalent malnutrition, infectious and non-communicable diseases. We discuss why nutrition is not synonymous with food and must be viewed as a biological variable that affects and is affected by both C-E-C as well as the current global health challenges. The nexus of C-E-C, food, nutrition and health must be considered in the development of safe and efficacious interventions...
November 22, 2016: Current Opinion in Biotechnology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27871750/biogeochemical-and-hydrological-drivers-of-the-dynamics-of-vibrio-species-in-two-patagonian-estuaries
#15
Germán A Kopprio, M Eugenia Streitenberger, Kentaro Okuno, Mónica Baldini, Florencia Biancalana, Anna Fricke, Ana Martínez, Sucharit B Neogi, Boris P Koch, Shinji Yamasaki, Rubén J Lara
The ecology of the most relevant Vibrio species for human health and their relation to water quality and biogeochemistry were studied in two estuaries in Argentinian Patagonia. Vibrio cholerae and Vibrio parahaemolyticus were reported in >29% of cases at the Río Colorado and Río Negro estuaries. Neither the pandemic serogroups of Vibrio cholerae O1, Vibrio cholerae O139 nor the cholera toxin gene were detected in this study. However, several strains of V. cholerae (not O1 or O139) are able to cause human disease or acquire pathogenic genes by horizontal transfer...
February 1, 2017: Science of the Total Environment
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27863533/ecological-niche-modelling-of-rift-valley-fever-virus-vectors-in-baringo-kenya
#16
Alfred O Ochieng, Mark Nanyingi, Edwin Kipruto, Isabella M Ondiba, Fred A Amimo, Christopher Oludhe, Daniel O Olago, Isaac K Nyamongo, Benson B A Estambale
BACKGROUND: Rift Valley fever (RVF) is a vector-borne zoonotic disease that has an impact on human health and animal productivity. Here, we explore the use of vector presence modelling to predict the distribution of RVF vector species under climate change scenario to demonstrate the potential for geographic spread of Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV). OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the effect of climate change on RVF vector distribution in Baringo County, Kenya, with an aim of developing a risk map for spatial prediction of RVF outbreaks...
2016: Infection Ecology & Epidemiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27845409/effects-of-seasonal-meteorological-variables-on-e-coli-persistence-in-livestock-faeces-and-implications-for-environmental-and-human-health
#17
David M Oliver, Trevor Page
Agriculture contributes significant volumes of livestock faeces to land. Understanding how faecal microbes respond to shifts in meteorological patterns of contrasting seasons is important in order to gauge how environmental (and human health) risks may alter under a changing climate. The aim of this study was to: (i) quantify the temporal pattern of E. coli growth within dairy faeces post defecation; and (ii) derive E. coli seasonal population change profiles associated with contrasting environmental drivers...
November 15, 2016: Scientific Reports
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27843166/climate-change-food-water-and-population-health-in-china
#18
Shilu Tong, Helen L Berry, Kristie Ebi, Hilary Bambrick, Wenbiao Hu, Donna Green, Elizabeth Hanna, Zhiqiang Wang, Colin D Butler
Anthropogenic climate change appears to be increasing the frequency, duration and intensity of extreme weather events. Such events have already had substantial impacts on socioeconomic development and population health. Climate change's most profound impacts are likely to be on food, health systems and water. This paper explores how climate change will affect food, human health and water in China. Projections indicate that the overall effects of climate change, land conversion and reduced water availability could reduce Chinese food production substantially - although uncertainty is inevitable in such projections...
October 1, 2016: Bulletin of the World Health Organization
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27835976/an-integrated-risk-and-vulnerability-assessment-framework-for-climate-change-and-malaria-transmission-in-east-africa
#19
Esther Achieng Onyango, Oz Sahin, Alex Awiti, Cordia Chu, Brendan Mackey
BACKGROUND: Malaria is one of the key research concerns in climate change-health relationships. Numerous risk assessments and modelling studies provide evidence that the transmission range of malaria will expand with rising temperatures, adversely impacting on vulnerable communities in the East African highlands. While there exist multiple lines of evidence for the influence of climate change on malaria transmission, there is insufficient understanding of the complex and interdependent factors that determine the risk and vulnerability of human populations at the community level...
November 11, 2016: Malaria Journal
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27834843/economic-evaluations-of-the-health-impacts-of-weather-related-extreme-events-a-scoping-review
#20
Laetitia H M Schmitt, Hilary M Graham, Piran C L White
The frequency and severity of extreme events is expected to increase under climate change. There is a need to understand the economic consequences of human exposure to these extreme events, to underpin decisions on risk reduction. We undertook a scoping review of economic evaluations of the adverse health effects from exposure to weather-related extreme events. We searched PubMed, Embase and Web of Science databases with no restrictions to the type of evaluations. Twenty studies were included, most of which were recently published...
November 8, 2016: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health
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