keyword
MENU ▼
Read by QxMD icon Read
search

ACR appropriateness criteria

keyword
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28660600/comparing-two-methods-for-determining-appropriateness-of-myocardial-perfusion-imaging-criteria-from-the-american-college-of-cardiology-foundation-and-the-american-college-of-radiology
#1
Anastasiya Bagrova, Ali Y Alsamarah, David E Winchester
BACKGROUND: Appropriate use criteria (AUC) developed by the American College of Cardiology Foundation and the appropriateness criteria (AC) developed by the American College of Radiology (ACR) are two existing methods of rating appropriateness of myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI). One study found poor agreement of ratings between the two methods. However, using the most contemporary AUC from 2013, it is unknown if poor agreement still exists. METHODS: Retrospective cohort investigation comparing patients undergoing nuclear MPI between June 2011 and September 2014...
June 28, 2017: Journal of Nuclear Cardiology: Official Publication of the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28641551/nailfold-capillaroscopy-within-and-beyond-the-scope-of-connective-tissue-diseases
#2
Sevdalina Lambova, Ulf Müller-Ladner
Nailfold capillaroscopy is a noninvasive instrumental method for morphological analysis of the nutritive capillaries in the nailfold area. In rheumatology, it is a method of choice among instrumental modalities for differentiation of primary and secondary Raynaud's phenomenon (RP) in rheumatic diseases. RP is a common diagnostic problem in rheumatology. Defining the proper diagnosis is a prerequisite for administration of the appropriate treatment. Thus, nailfold capillaroscopic examination is of crucial importance for the every-day practice of the rheumatologists and is currently gaining increasing attention...
June 14, 2017: Current Rheumatology Reviews
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28598564/withdrawn-celecoxib-for-rheumatoid-arthritis
#3
REVIEW
Sarah E Garner, Dogan Fidan, Ruth R Frankish, Maria Judd, Beverley Shea, Tanveer Towheed, Peter Tugwell, George A Wells
BACKGROUND: Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a systemic auto-immune disorder, involving persistent joint inflammation. NSAIDs are used to control the symptoms of RA, but are associated with significant gastro-intestinal toxicity, including a risk of potentially life threatening gastroduodenal perforations, ulcers and bleeds. The NSAIDs known as the selective Cox II inhibitors, of which celecoxib is a member, were developed in order to reduce the GI toxicity, but are more expensive. OBJECTIVES: To establish the efficacy and safety of celecoxib in the management of RA by systematic review of available evidence...
June 9, 2017: Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28544615/suppressing-inflammation-in-rheumatoid-arthritis-does-patient-global-assessment-blur-the-target-a-practice-based-call-for-a-paradigm-change
#4
Ricardo J O Ferreira, Cátia Duarte, Mwidimi Ndosi, Maarten de Wit, Laure Gossec, J A P da Silva
OBJECTIVES: In current management paradigms of Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA), patient global assessment (PGA) is crucial to decide whether a patient has attained remission (target) or needs reinforced therapy. We investigated whether the clinical and psychological determinants of PGA are appropriate to support this important role. METHODS: This was a cross-sectional, single centre study including consecutive ambulatory RA patients. Data collection comprised swollen (SJC28) and tender joint counts (TJC28), C-Reactive protein (CRP), PGA, pain, fatigue, function, anxiety, depression, happiness, personality traits, and comorbidities...
May 23, 2017: Arthritis Care & Research
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28473098/acr-appropriateness-criteria-%C3%A2-chronic-hip-pain
#5
Douglas N Mintz, Catherine C Roberts, Jenny T Bencardino, Steven J Baccei, Michelle S Caird, R Carter Cassidy, Eric Y Chang, Michael G Fox, Soterios Gyftopoulos, Mark J Kransdorf, Darlene F Metter, William B Morrison, Zehava S Rosenberg, Nehal A Shah, Kirstin M Small, Naveen Subhas, Siddharth Tambar, Jeffrey D Towers, Joseph S Yu, Barbara N Weissman
Chronic hip pain is a common clinical problem whose cause is often elucidated by imaging. The ACR Appropriateness Criteria for chronic hip pain define best practices of image ordering. Clinical scenarios are followed by the imaging choices and their appropriateness. The information is in ordered tables with an accompanying narrative explanation to guide physicians to order the right test. The American College of Radiology Appropriateness Criteria are evidence-based guidelines for specific clinical conditions that are reviewed annually by a multidisciplinary expert panel...
May 2017: Journal of the American College of Radiology: JACR
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28473097/acr-appropriateness-criteria-%C3%A2-chronic-extremity-joint-pain-suspected-inflammatory-arthritis
#6
Jon A Jacobson, Catherine C Roberts, Jenny T Bencardino, Marc Appel, Erin Arnold, Steven J Baccei, R Carter Cassidy, Eric Y Chang, Michael G Fox, Bennett S Greenspan, Soterios Gyftopoulos, Mary G Hochman, Douglas N Mintz, Joel S Newman, Zehava S Rosenberg, Nehal A Shah, Kirstin M Small, Barbara N Weissman
Evaluation for suspected inflammatory arthritis as a cause for chronic extremity joint pain often relies on imaging. This review first discusses the characteristic osseous and soft tissue abnormalities seen with inflammatory arthritis and how they may be imaged. It is essential that imaging results are interpreted in the context of clinical and serologic results to add specificity as there is significant overlap of imaging findings among the various types of arthritis. This review provides recommendations for imaging evaluation of specific types of inflammatory arthritis, including rheumatoid arthritis, seronegative spondyloarthropathy, gout, calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate disease (or pseudogout), and erosive osteoarthritis...
May 2017: Journal of the American College of Radiology: JACR
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28473096/acr-appropriateness-criteria-%C3%A2-chronic-chest-pain-high-probability-of-coronary-artery-disease
#7
Scott R Akers, Vandan Panchal, Vincent B Ho, Garth M Beache, Richard K J Brown, Brian B Ghoshhajra, S Bruce Greenberg, Joe Y Hsu, Gregory A Kicska, James K Min, Arthur E Stillman, Jadranka Stojanovska, Suhny Abbara, Jill E Jacobs
In patients with chronic chest pain in the setting of high probability of coronary artery disease (CAD), imaging has major and diverse roles. First, imaging is valuable in determining and documenting the presence, extent, and severity of myocardial ischemia, hibernation, scarring, and/or the presence, site, and severity of obstructive coronary lesions. Second, imaging findings are important in determining the course of management of patients with suspected chronic myocardial ischemia and better defining those patients best suited for medical therapy, angioplasty/stenting, or surgery...
May 2017: Journal of the American College of Radiology: JACR
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28473095/acr-appropriateness-criteria-%C3%A2-chronic-back%C3%A2-pain%C3%A2-suspected-sacroiliitis-spondyloarthropathy
#8
Stephanie A Bernard, Mark J Kransdorf, Francesca D Beaman, Ronald S Adler, Behrang Amini, Marc Appel, Erin Arnold, R Carter Cassidy, Bennett S Greenspan, Kenneth S Lee, Michael J Tuite, Eric A Walker, Robert J Ward, Daniel E Wessell, Barbara N Weissman
Inflammatory sacroiliitis or the seronegative axial spondyloarthropathies often presents as back pain or sacroiliac joint pain of more than 3-month duration with inflammatory symptoms and typically in patients younger than 45 years of age. Imaging plays an important role in diagnosis and disease monitoring. This article addresses the appropriate sequence of initial imaging for evaluation of a suspected spondyloarthropathy, the imaging follow-up of treatment response and the special considerations for imaging of trauma in patients with ankylosis of the spine...
May 2017: Journal of the American College of Radiology: JACR
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28473094/acr-appropriateness-criteria-%C3%A2-vascular-claudication-assessment-for-revascularization
#9
Osmanuddin Ahmed, Michael Hanley, Shelby J Bennett, Ankur Chandra, Benoit Desjardins, Kenneth L Gage, Marie D Gerhard-Herman, Michael Ginsburg, Heather L Gornik, Isabel B Oliva, Michael L Steigner, Richard Strax, Nupur Verma, Frank J Rybicki, Karin E Dill
Vascular claudication is a symptom complex characterized by reproducible pain and weakness in an active muscle group due to peripheral arterial disease. Noninvasive hemodynamic tests such as the ankle brachial index, toe brachial index, segmental pressures, and pulse volume recordings are considered the first imaging modalities necessary to reliably establish the presence and severity of arterial obstructions. Vascular imaging is consequently used for diagnosing individual lesions and triaging patients for medical, percutaneous, or surgical intervention...
May 2017: Journal of the American College of Radiology: JACR
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28473093/acr-appropriateness-criteria-%C3%A2-urinary-tract%C3%A2-infection-child
#10
Boaz K Karmazyn, Adina L Alazraki, Sudha A Anupindi, Molly E Dempsey, Jonathan R Dillman, Scott R Dorfman, Matthew D Garber, Sheila G Moore, Craig A Peters, Henry E Rice, Cynthia K Rigsby, Nabile M Safdar, Stephen F Simoneaux, Andrew T Trout, Sjirk J Westra, Sandra L Wootton-Gorges, Brian D Coley
Urinary tract infection (UTI) is common in young children and may cause pyelonephritis and renal scarring. Long-term complications from renal scarring are low. The role of imaging is to evaluate for underlying urologic abnormalities and guide treatment. In neonates there is increased risk for underlying urologic abnormalities. Evaluation for vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) may be appropriate especially in boys because of higher prevalence of VUR and to exclude posterior urethral valve. In children older than 2 months with first episode of uncomplicated UTI, there is no clear benefit of prophylactic antibiotic...
May 2017: Journal of the American College of Radiology: JACR
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28473092/acr-appropriateness-criteria-%C3%A2-suspected-pulmonary-hypertension
#11
Arlene Sirajuddin, Edwin F Donnelly, Traves P Crabtree, Travis S Henry, Mark D Iannettoni, Geoffrey B Johnson, Ella A Kazerooni, Fabien Maldonado, Kathryn M Olsen, Carol C Wu, Tan-Lucien Mohammed, Jeffrey P Kanne
Pulmonary hypertension may be idiopathic or related to a large variety of diseases. Various imaging examinations that may be helpful in diagnosing and determining the etiology of pulmonary hypertension are discussed. Imaging examinations that may aid in the diagnosis of pulmonary hypertension include chest radiography, ultrasound echocardiography, ventilation/perfusion scans, CT, MRI, right heart catheterization, pulmonary angiography, and fluorine-18-2-fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose PET/CT. The American College of Radiology Appropriateness Criteria are evidence-based guidelines for specific clinical conditions that are reviewed annually by a multidisciplinary expert panel...
May 2017: Journal of the American College of Radiology: JACR
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28473091/acr-appropriateness-criteria-%C3%A2-cerebrovascular%C3%A2-disease
#12
Michael B Salmela, Shabnam Mortazavi, Bharathi D Jagadeesan, Daniel F Broderick, Judah Burns, Tejaswini K Deshmukh, H Benjamin Harvey, Jenny Hoang, Christopher H Hunt, Tabassum A Kennedy, Alexander A Khalessi, William Mack, Nandini D Patel, Joel S Perlmutter, Bruno Policeni, Jason W Schroeder, Gavin Setzen, Matthew T Whitehead, Rebecca S Cornelius, Amanda S Corey
Diseases of the cerebral vasculature represent a heterogeneous group of ischemic and hemorrhagic etiologies, which often manifest clinically as an acute neurologic deficit also known as stroke or less commonly with symptoms such as headache or seizures. Stroke is the fourth leading cause of death and is a leading cause of serious long-term disability in the United States. Eighty-seven percent of strokes are ischemic, 10% are due to intracerebral hemorrhage, and 3% are secondary to subarachnoid hemorrhage. The past two decades have seen significant developments in the screening, diagnosis, and treatment of ischemic and hemorrhagic causes of stroke with advancements in CT and MRI technology and novel treatment devices and techniques...
May 2017: Journal of the American College of Radiology: JACR
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28473090/acr-appropriateness-criteria-%C3%A2-suspected-physical-abuse-child
#13
Sandra L Wootton-Gorges, Bruno P Soares, Adina L Alazraki, Sudha A Anupindi, Jeffrey P Blount, Timothy N Booth, Molly E Dempsey, Richard A Falcone, Laura L Hayes, Abhaya V Kulkarni, Sonia Partap, Cynthia K Rigsby, Maura E Ryan, Nabile M Safdar, Andrew T Trout, Roger F Widmann, Boaz K Karmazyn, Susan Palasis
The youngest children, particularly in the first year of life, are the most vulnerable to physical abuse. Skeletal survey is the universal screening examination in children 24 months of age and younger. Fractures occur in over half of abused children. Rib fractures may be the only abnormality in about 30%. A repeat limited skeletal survey after 2 weeks can detect additional fractures and can provide fracture dating information. The type and extent of additional imaging for pediatric patients being evaluated for suspected physical abuse depends on the age of the child, the presence of neurologic signs and symptoms, evidence of thoracic or abdominopelvic injuries, and social considerations...
May 2017: Journal of the American College of Radiology: JACR
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28473089/acr-appropriateness-criteria-%C3%A2-suspected-osteomyelitis-septic-arthritis-or-soft-tissue-infection-excluding-spine-and-diabetic-foot
#14
Francesca D Beaman, Paul F von Herrmann, Mark J Kransdorf, Ronald S Adler, Behrang Amini, Marc Appel, Erin Arnold, Stephanie A Bernard, Bennett S Greenspan, Kenneth S Lee, Michael J Tuite, Eric A Walker, Robert J Ward, Daniel E Wessell, Barbara N Weissman
Infection of the musculoskeletal system is a common clinical problem. Differentiating soft tissue from osseous infection often determines the appropriate clinical therapeutic course. Radiographs are the recommend initial imaging examination, and although often not diagnostic in acute osteomyelitis, can provide anatomic evaluation and alternative diagnoses influencing subsequent imaging selection and interpretation. MRI with contrast is the examination of choice for the evaluation of suspected osteomyelitis, and MRI, CT, and ultrasound can all be useful in the diagnosis of soft tissue infection...
May 2017: Journal of the American College of Radiology: JACR
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28473088/acr-appropriateness-criteria-%C3%A2-suspected-liver%C3%A2-metastases
#15
Harmeet Kaur, Nicole M Hindman, Waddah B Al-Refaie, Hina Arif-Tiwari, Brooks D Cash, Victoria Chernyak, James Farrell, Joseph R Grajo, Jeanne M Horowitz, Michelle M McNamara, Richard B Noto, Aliya Qayyum, Tasneem Lalani, Ihab R Kamel
Liver metastases are the most common malignant liver tumors. The accurate and early detection and characterization of liver lesions is the key to successful treatment strategies. Increasingly, surgical resection in combination with chemotherapy is effective in significantly improving survival if all metastases are successfully resected. MRI and multiphase CT are the primary imaging modalities in the assessment of liver metastasis, with the relative preference toward multiphase CT or MRI depending upon the clinical setting (ie, surveillance or presurgical planning)...
May 2017: Journal of the American College of Radiology: JACR
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28473087/acr-appropriateness-criteria-%C3%A2-sudden-onset%C3%A2-of%C3%A2-cold-painful-leg
#16
Clifford R Weiss, Ezana M Azene, Bill S Majdalany, Ali F AbuRahma, Jeremy D Collins, Christopher J Francois, Marie D Gerhard-Herman, Heather L Gornik, John M Moriarty, Patrick T Norton, Thomas Ptak, Stephen P Reis, Frank J Rybicki, Sanjeeva P Kalva
Acute limb ischemia (ALI) requires urgent diagnosis and treatment to prevent limb loss. Invasive digital subtraction arteriography (DSA) is the gold standard for diagnosing ALI. DSA is the only diagnostic modality that permits simultaneous treatment of acute arterial occlusion. Noninvasive imaging with MRA or CT angiography may also be appropriate before treatment, especially when the diagnosis of ALI is in doubt or where DSA is unavailable. Other imaging and noninvasive physiologic tests may prove important for longer term management but are less recommended in the acute setting...
May 2017: Journal of the American College of Radiology: JACR
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28473086/acr-appropriateness-criteria-%C3%A2-stress-fatigue-insufficiency-fracture-including-sacrum-%C3%A2-excluding-other-vertebrae
#17
Jenny T Bencardino, Taylor J Stone, Catherine C Roberts, Marc Appel, Steven J Baccei, R Carter Cassidy, Eric Y Chang, Michael G Fox, Bennett S Greenspan, Soterios Gyftopoulos, Mary G Hochman, Jon A Jacobson, Douglas N Mintz, Gary W Mlady, Joel S Newman, Zehava S Rosenberg, Nehal A Shah, Kirstin M Small, Barbara N Weissman
Stress fractures, including both fatigue and insufficiency types, are frequently encountered in clinical practice as a source of pain in both athletes and patients with predisposing conditions. Radiography is the imaging modality of choice for baseline diagnosis. MRI has greatly improved our ability to diagnose radiographically occult stress fractures. Tc-99m bone scan and CT may also be useful as diagnostic tools. Although fatigue and insufficiency fractures can be self-limited and go onto healing even without diagnosis, there is usually value in initiating prompt therapeutic measures as incomplete stress fractures have the potential of progressing to completion and requiring more invasive treatment or delay in return to activity...
May 2017: Journal of the American College of Radiology: JACR
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28473085/acr-appropriateness-criteria-%C3%A2-stage-i-breast-cancer-initial-workup-and-surveillance-for-local-recurrence-and-distant-metastases-in-asymptomatic-women
#18
Linda Moy, Lisa Bailey, Carl D'Orsi, Edward D Green, Anna I Holbrook, Su-Ju Lee, Ana P Lourenco, Martha B Mainiero, Karla A Sepulveda, Priscilla J Slanetz, Sunita Trikha, Monica M Yepes, Mary S Newell
Women and health care professionals generally prefer intensive follow-up after a diagnosis of breast cancer. However, there are no survival differences between women who obtain intensive surveillance with imaging and laboratory studies compared with women who only undergo testing because of the development of symptoms or findings on clinical examinations. American Society of Clinical Oncology and National Comprehensive Cancer Network guidelines state that annual mammography is the only imaging examination that should be performed to detect a localized breast recurrence in asymptomatic patients; more imaging may be needed if the patient has locoregional symptoms (eg, palpable abnormality)...
May 2017: Journal of the American College of Radiology: JACR
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28473084/acr-appropriateness-criteria-%C3%A2-renal-transplant%C3%A2-dysfunction
#19
Myles T Taffel, Paul Nikolaidis, Michael D Beland, M Donald Blaufox, Vikram S Dogra, Stanley Goldfarb, John L Gore, Howard J Harvin, Marta E Heilbrun, Matthew T Heller, Gaurav Khatri, Glenn M Preminger, Andrei S Purysko, Andrew D Smith, Zhen J Wang, Robert M Weinfeld, Jade J Wong-You-Cheong, Erick M Remer, Mark E Lockhart
Renal transplantation is the treatment of choice in patients with end-stage renal disease because the 5-year survival rates range from 72% to 99%. Although graft survival has improved secondary to the introduction of newer immunosuppression drugs and the advancements in surgical technique, various complications still occur. Ultrasound is the first-line imaging modality for the evaluation of renal transplants in the immediate postoperative period and for long-term follow-up. In addition to depicting many of the potential complications of renal transplantation, ultrasound can also guide therapeutic interventions...
May 2017: Journal of the American College of Radiology: JACR
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28473083/acr-appropriateness-criteria-%C3%A2-radiologic-management-of-mesenteric-ischemia
#20
Nicholas Fidelman, Ali F AbuRahma, Brooks D Cash, Baljendra S Kapoor, M-Grace Knuttinen, Jeet Minocha, Paul J Rochon, Colette M Shaw, Charles E Ray, Jonathan M Lorenz
Mesenteric vascular insufficiency is a serious medical condition that may lead to bowel infarction, morbidity, and mortality that may approach 50%. Recommended therapy for acute mesenteric ischemia includes aspiration embolectomy, transcatheter thrombolysis, and angioplasty with or without stenting for the treatment of underlying arterial stenosis. Nonocclusive mesenteric ischemia may respond to transarterial infusion of vasodilators such as nitroglycerin, papaverine, glucagon, and prostaglandin E1. Recommended therapy for chronic mesenteric ischemia includes angioplasty with or without stent placement and, if an endovascular approach is not possible, surgical bypass or endarterectomy...
May 2017: Journal of the American College of Radiology: JACR
keyword
keyword
59957
1
2
Fetch more papers »
Fetching more papers... Fetching...
Read by QxMD. Sign in or create an account to discover new knowledge that matter to you.
Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read
×

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"