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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27917394/a-deep-ensemble-learning-method-for-monaural-speech-separation
#1
Xiao-Lei Zhang, DeLiang Wang
Monaural speech separation is a fundamental problem in robust speech processing. Recently, deep neural network (DNN)-based speech separation methods, which predict either clean speech or an ideal time-frequency mask, have demonstrated remarkable performance improvement. However, a single DNN with a given window length does not leverage contextual information sufficiently, and the differences between the two optimization objectives are not well understood. In this paper, we propose a deep ensemble method, named multicontext networks, to address monaural speech separation...
March 2016: IEEE/ACM Transactions on Audio, Speech, and Language Processing
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27914446/speech-recognition-for-multiple-bands-implications-for-the-speech-intelligibility-index
#2
Larry E Humes, Gary R Kidd
The Speech Intelligibility Index (SII) assumes additivity of the importance of acoustically independent bands of speech. To further evaluate this assumption, open-set speech recognition was measured for words and sentences, in quiet and in noise, when the speech stimuli were presented to the listener in selected frequency bands. The filter passbands were constructed from various combinations of 20 bands having equivalent (0.05) importance in the SII framework. This permitted the construction of a variety of equal-SII band patterns that were then evaluated by nine different groups of young adults with normal hearing...
September 2016: Journal of the Acoustical Society of America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27914422/modeling-of-oropharyngeal-articulatory-adaptation-to-compensate-for-the-acoustic-effects-of-nasalization
#3
Panying Rong, David P Kuehn, Ryan K Shosted
Hypernasality is one of the most detrimental speech disturbances that lead to declines of speech intelligibility. Velopharyngeal inadequacy, which is associated with anatomic defects such as cleft palate or neuromuscular disorders that affect velopharygneal function, is the primary cause of hypernasality. A simulation study by Rong and Kuehn [J. Speech Lang. Hear. Res. 55(5), 1438-1448 (2012)] demonstrated that properly adjusted oropharyngeal articulation can reduce nasality for vowels synthesized with an articulatory model [Mermelstein, J...
September 2016: Journal of the Acoustical Society of America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27914381/modulation-masking-and-glimpsing-of-natural-and-vocoded-speech-during-single-talker-modulated-noise-effect-of-the-modulation-spectrum
#4
Daniel Fogerty, Jiaqian Xu, Bobby E Gibbs
Compared to notionally steady-state noise, modulated maskers provide a perceptual benefit for speech recognition, in part due to preserved speech information during the amplitude dips of the masker. However, overlap in the modulation spectrum between the target speech and the competing modulated masker may potentially result in modulation masking, and thereby offset the release from energetic masking. The current study investigated masking release provided by single-talker modulated noise. The overlap in the modulation spectra of the target speech and the modulated noise masker was varied through time compression or expansion of the competing masker...
September 2016: Journal of the Acoustical Society of America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27913365/portable-mtbi-assessment-using-temporal-and-frequency-analysis-of-speech
#5
Louis Daudet, Nikhil Yadav, Matthew Perez, Christian Poellabauer, Sandra Schneider, Alan Huebner
This paper shows that extraction and analysis of various acoustic features from speech using mobile devices can allow the detection of patterns that could be indicative of neurological trauma. This may pave the way for new types of biomarkers and diagnostic tools. Toward this end, we created a mobile application designed to diagnose mild traumatic brain injuries (mTBI) such as concussions. Using this application, data was collected from youth athletes from 47 high schools and colleges in the the Midwestern United States...
December 1, 2016: IEEE Journal of Biomedical and Health Informatics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27913092/evaluation-of-phonatory-behavior-and-voice-quality-in-patients-with-multiple-sclerosis-treated-with-deep-brain-stimulation
#6
Manfred Pützer, Wolfgang Wokurek, Jean Richard Moringlane
OBJECTIVES: The effect of deep brain stimulation (DBS) on phonatory behavior and voice quality in eight patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) was examined instrumentally and perceptually. The acoustic signals of vowel productions obtained from patients (produced with and without stimulation) and from a group of 16 healthy control speakers were analyzed to prove statistically the changes of phonatory behavior and voice quality. STUDY DESIGN: This is a randomized study...
November 30, 2016: Journal of Voice: Official Journal of the Voice Foundation
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27908075/the-relationship-between-perceptual-disturbances-in-dysarthric-speech-and-automatic-speech-recognition-performance
#7
Ming Tu, Alan Wisler, Visar Berisha, Julie M Liss
State-of-the-art automatic speech recognition (ASR) engines perform well on healthy speech; however recent studies show that their performance on dysarthric speech is highly variable. This is because of the acoustic variability associated with the different dysarthria subtypes. This paper aims to develop a better understanding of how perceptual disturbances in dysarthric speech relate to ASR performance. Accurate ratings of a representative set of 32 dysarthric speakers along different perceptual dimensions are obtained and the performance of a representative ASR algorithm on the same set of speakers is analyzed...
November 2016: Journal of the Acoustical Society of America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27908069/associations-between-tongue-movement-pattern-consistency-and-formant-movement-pattern-consistency-in-response-to-speech-behavioral-modifications
#8
Antje S Mefferd
The degree of speech movement pattern consistency can provide information about speech motor control. Although tongue motor control is particularly important because of the tongue's primary contribution to the speech acoustic signal, capturing tongue movements during speech remains difficult and costly. This study sought to determine if formant movements could be used to estimate tongue movement pattern consistency indirectly. Two age groups (seven young adults and seven older adults) and six speech conditions (typical, slow, loud, clear, fast, bite block speech) were selected to elicit an age- and task-dependent performance range in tongue movement pattern consistency...
November 2016: Journal of the Acoustical Society of America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27908060/individual-differences-in-the-perception-of-regional-nonnative-and-disordered-speech-varieties
#9
Tessa Bent, Melissa Baese-Berk, Stephanie A Borrie, Megan McKee
Speech perception abilities vary substantially across listeners, particularly in adverse conditions including those stemming from environmental degradation (e.g., noise) or from talker-related challenges (e.g., nonnative or disordered speech). This study examined adult listeners' recognition of words in phrases produced by six talkers representing three speech varieties: a nonnative accent (Spanish-accented English), a regional dialect (Irish English), and a disordered variety (ataxic dysarthria). Semantically anomalous phrases from these talkers were presented in a transcription task and intelligibility scores, percent words correct, were compared across the three speech varieties...
November 2016: Journal of the Acoustical Society of America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27908053/detection-of-fricatives-using-s-transform
#10
Hari Krishna Vydana, Anil Kumar Vuppala
Two prime acoustic characteristics of fricatives are the concentration of spectral energy above 3 kHz and having noisy nature. Spectral domain approaches for detecting fricatives rely on capturing the information from spectral energy distribution. In this work, S-transform based time-frequency representation is explored for detecting fricatives from continuous speech. S-transform based time-frequency representation exhibits a progressive resolution which is tailored for localizing the high frequency events (i...
November 2016: Journal of the Acoustical Society of America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27908052/visual-tactile-integration-in-speech-perception-evidence-for-modality-neutral-speech-primitives
#11
Katie Bicevskis, Donald Derrick, Bryan Gick
Audio-visual [McGurk and MacDonald (1976). Nature 264, 746-748] and audio-tactile [Gick and Derrick (2009). Nature 462(7272), 502-504] speech stimuli enhance speech perception over audio stimuli alone. In addition, multimodal speech stimuli form an asymmetric window of integration that is consistent with the relative speeds of the various signals [Munhall, Gribble, Sacco, and Ward (1996). Percept. Psychophys. 58(3), 351-362; Gick, Ikegami, and Derrick (2010). J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 128(5), EL342-EL346]. In this experiment, participants were presented video of faces producing /pa/ and /ba/ syllables, both alone and with air puffs occurring synchronously and at different timings up to 300 ms before and after the stop release...
November 2016: Journal of the Acoustical Society of America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27908046/band-importance-functions-of-listeners-with-cochlear-implants-using-clinical-maps
#12
Adam K Bosen, Monita Chatterjee
Band importance functions estimate the relative contribution of individual acoustic frequency bands to speech intelligibility. Previous studies of band importance in listeners with cochlear implants have used experimental maps and direct stimulation. Here, band importance was estimated for clinical maps with acoustic stimulation. Listeners with cochlear implants had band importance functions that relied more heavily on lower frequencies and showed less cross-listener consistency than in listeners with normal hearing...
November 2016: Journal of the Acoustical Society of America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27908037/the-structure-of-hindi-stop-consonants
#13
Kushagra Singh, Nachiketa Tiwari
The pronunciation of stop consonants varies markedly with age, gender, accent, etc. Yet by extracting appropriate cues common to these varying pronunciations, it is possible to correctly identify the spoken consonant. In this paper, the structure underlying Hindi stop consonants is presented. This understanding may potentially be used as a "recipe" for their artificial synthesis. Hindi alphabet stops were analyzed for this purpose. This alphabet has an organized and comprehensive inventory of stop consonants, and its consonants invariably terminate with the neutral vowel schwa...
November 2016: Journal of the Acoustical Society of America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27908030/influences-of-noise-interruption-and-information-bearing-acoustic-changes-on-understanding-simulated-electric-acoustic-speech
#14
Christian Stilp, Gail Donaldson, Soohee Oh, Ying-Yee Kong
In simulations of electrical-acoustic stimulation (EAS), vocoded speech intelligibility is aided by preservation of low-frequency acoustic cues. However, the speech signal is often interrupted in everyday listening conditions, and effects of interruption on hybrid speech intelligibility are poorly understood. Additionally, listeners rely on information-bearing acoustic changes to understand full-spectrum speech (as measured by cochlea-scaled entropy [CSE]) and vocoded speech (CSECI), but how listeners utilize these informational changes to understand EAS speech is unclear...
November 2016: Journal of the Acoustical Society of America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27898342/voice-sensitive-brain-networks-encode-talker-specific-phonetic-detail
#15
Emily B Myers, Rachel M Theodore
The speech stream simultaneously carries information about talker identity and linguistic content, and the same acoustic property (e.g., voice-onset-time, or VOT) may be used for both purposes. Separable neural networks for processing talker identity and phonetic content have been identified, but it is unclear how a singular acoustic property is parsed by the neural system for talker identification versus phonetic processing. In the current study, listeners were exposed to two talkers with characteristically different VOTs...
November 26, 2016: Brain and Language
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27894891/source-analysis-of-auditory-steady-state-responses-in-acoustic-and-electric-hearing
#16
Robert Luke, Astrid De Vos, Jan Wouters
Speech is a complex signal containing a broad variety of acoustic information. For accurate speech reception, the listener must perceive modulations over a range of envelope frequencies. Perception of these modulations is particularly important for cochlear implant (CI) users, as all commercial devices use envelope coding strategies. Prolonged deafness affects the auditory pathway. However, little is known of how cochlear implantation affects the neural processing of modulated stimuli. This study investigates and contrasts the neural processing of envelope rate modulated signals in acoustic and CI listeners...
November 25, 2016: NeuroImage
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27894006/distinct-patterns-of-imprecise-consonant-articulation-among-parkinson-s-disease-progressive-supranuclear-palsy-and-multiple-system-atrophy
#17
Tereza Tykalova, Jan Rusz, Jiri Klempir, Roman Cmejla, Evzen Ruzicka
Distinct speech characteristics that may aid in differentiation between Parkinson's disease (PD), progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) and multiple system atrophy (MSA) remain tremendously under-explored. Here, the patterns and degree of consonant articulation deficits across voiced and voiceless stop plosives in 16 PD, 16 PSP, 16 MSA and 16 healthy control speakers were evaluated using acoustic and perceptual methods. Imprecise consonant articulation was observed across all Parkinsonian groups. Voice onset time of voiceless plosives was more prolonged in both PSP and MSA compared to PD, presumably due to greater severity of dysarthria and slower articulation rate...
November 25, 2016: Brain and Language
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27891665/spectral-summation-and-facilitation-in-on-and-off-responses-for-optimized-representation-of-communication-calls-in-mouse-inferior-colliculus
#18
Alexander G Akimov, Marina A Egorova, Günter Ehret
Selectivity for processing of species-specific vocalizations and communication sounds has often been associated with the auditory cortex. The midbrain inferior colliculus, however, is the first center in the auditory pathways of mammals integrating acoustic information processed in separate nuclei and channels in the brainstem and, therefore, could significantly contribute to enhance the perception of species' communication sounds. Here, we used natural wriggling calls of mouse pups, which communicate need for maternal care to adult females, and further 15 synthesized sounds to test the hypothesis that neurons in the central nucleus of the inferior colliculus of adult females optimize their response rates for reproduction of the three main harmonics (formants) of wriggling calls...
November 27, 2016: European Journal of Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27891084/differential-effects-of-visual-acoustic-biofeedback-intervention-for-residual-speech-errors
#19
Tara McAllister Byun, Heather Campbell
Recent evidence suggests that the incorporation of visual biofeedback technologies may enhance response to treatment in individuals with residual speech errors. However, there is a need for controlled research systematically comparing biofeedback versus non-biofeedback intervention approaches. This study implemented a single-subject experimental design with a crossover component to investigate the relative efficacy of visual-acoustic biofeedback and traditional articulatory treatment for residual rhotic errors...
2016: Frontiers in Human Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27885979/gender-differences-in-audiological-findings-and-hearing-aid-benefit-in-255-individuals-with-auditory-neuropathy-spectrum-disorder-a-retrospective-study
#20
Vijaya Kumar Narne, Prashanth Prabhu, Hunsur S Chandan, Mahadeva Deepthi
BACKGROUND: There are many studies reported in the literature that have summarized audiological findings and possible rehabilitation in individuals with auditory neuropathy spectrum disorder (ANSD). However, there are very few studies that have attempted to delineate the gender differences in audiological characteristics and hearing aid benefit in individuals with ANSD. PURPOSE: The study aimed to explore the differences between males and females in terms of demographic details, audiogram, speech identification scores, otoacoustic emissions, acoustic reflexes, long latency responses, and hearing aid benefit...
November 2016: Journal of the American Academy of Audiology
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