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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28108414/the-macaque-lateral-grasping-network-a-neural-substrate-for-generating-purposeful-hand-actions
#1
REVIEW
Elena Borra, Marzio Gerbella, Stefano Rozzi, Giuseppe Luppino
In primates, neural mechanisms for controlling skilled hand actions primarily rely on sensorimotor transformations. These transformations are mediated by circuits linking specific inferior parietal with ventral premotor areas in which sensory coding of objects' features automatically trigger appropriate hand motor programs. Recently, connectional studies in macaques showed that these parietal and premotor areas are nodes of a large-scale cortical network, designated as "lateral grasping network," including specific temporal and prefrontal sectors involved in object recognition and executive functions, respectively...
January 17, 2017: Neuroscience and Biobehavioral Reviews
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28105722/charting-the-neglected-west-the-social-system-of-guinea-baboons
#2
Julia Fischer, Gisela H Kopp, Federica Dal Pesco, Adeelia Goffe, Kurt Hammerschmidt, Urs Kalbitzer, Matthias Klapproth, Peter Maciej, Ibrahima Ndao, Annika Patzelt, Dietmar Zinner
OBJECTIVES: Primate social systems are remarkably diverse, and thus play a central role in understanding social evolution, including the biological origin of human societies. Although baboons have been prominently featured in this context, historically little was known about the westernmost member of the genus, the Guinea baboon (Papio papio). MATERIAL AND METHODS: Here, we summarize the findings from the first years of observations at the field site CRP Simenti in the Niokolo Koba National Park in Senegal...
January 2017: American Journal of Physical Anthropology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28098598/science-of-intracrinology-in-postmenopausal-women
#3
Fernand Labrie, Alain Bélanger, Georges Pelletier, Céline Martel, David F Archer, Wulf H Utian
OBJECTIVE: To illustrate the marked differences between classical endocrinology that distributes hormones to all tissues of the body through the bloodstream and the science of intracrinology, whereby each cell of each peripheral tissue makes a small and appropriate amount of estrogens and androgens from the inactive precursor dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), DHEA being mainly of adrenal origin. Because only the inactivated sex steroids are released in the blood, influence in the other tissues is avoided...
January 16, 2017: Menopause: the Journal of the North American Menopause Society
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28092078/the-dot-probe-task-to-measure-emotional-attention-a-suitable-measure-in-comparative-studies
#4
Rianne van Rooijen, Annemie Ploeger, Mariska E Kret
For social animals, attending to and recognizing the emotional expressions of other individuals is of crucial importance for their survival and likely has a deep evolutionary origin. Gaining insight into how emotional expressions evolved as adaptations over the course of evolution can be achieved by making direct cross-species comparisons. To that extent, experimental paradigms that are suitable for investigating emotional processing across species need to be developed and evaluated. The emotional dot-probe task, which measures attention allocation toward emotional stimuli, has this potential...
January 13, 2017: Psychonomic Bulletin & Review
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28087242/brains-for-birds-and-babies-neural-parallels-between-birdsong-and-speech-acquisition
#5
REVIEW
Jonathan Prather, Kazuo Okanoya, Johan J Bolhuis
Language as a computational cognitive mechanism appears to be unique to the human species. However, there are remarkable behavioral similarities between song learning in songbirds and speech acquisition in human infants that are absent in non-human primates. Here we review important neural parallels between birdsong and speech. In both cases there are separate but continually interacting neural networks that underlie vocal production, sensorimotor learning, and auditory perception and memory. As in the case of human speech, neural activity related to birdsong learning is lateralized, and mirror neurons linking perception and performance may contribute to sensorimotor learning...
January 10, 2017: Neuroscience and Biobehavioral Reviews
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28077068/structure-and-evolution-of-the-filaggrin-gene-repeated-region-in-primates
#6
Vanessa Romero, Kazuyoshi Hosomichi, Hirofumi Nakaoka, Hiroki Shibata, Ituro Inoue
BACKGROUND: The evolutionary dynamics of repeat sequences is quite complex, with some duplicates never having differentiated from each other. Two models can explain the complex evolutionary process for repeated genes-concerted and birth-and-death, of which the latter is driven by duplications maintained by selection. Copy number variations caused by random duplications and losses in repeat regions may modulate molecular pathways and therefore affect phenotypic characteristics in a population, resulting in individuals that are able to adapt to new environments...
January 11, 2017: BMC Evolutionary Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28076426/evidence-of-a-vocalic-proto-system-in-the-baboon-papio-papio-suggests-pre-hominin-speech-precursors
#7
Louis-Jean Boë, Frédéric Berthommier, Thierry Legou, Guillaume Captier, Caralyn Kemp, Thomas R Sawallis, Yannick Becker, Arnaud Rey, Joël Fagot
Language is a distinguishing characteristic of our species, and the course of its evolution is one of the hardest problems in science. It has long been generally considered that human speech requires a low larynx, and that the high larynx of nonhuman primates should preclude their producing the vowel systems universally found in human language. Examining the vocalizations through acoustic analyses, tongue anatomy, and modeling of acoustic potential, we found that baboons (Papio papio) produce sounds sharing the F1/F2 formant structure of the human [ɨ æ ɑ ɔ u] vowels, and that similarly with humans those vocalic qualities are organized as a system on two acoustic-anatomic axes...
2017: PloS One
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28052920/evolution-of-transcript-modification-by-n6-methyladenosine-in-primates
#8
Lijia Ma, Boxuan Zhao, Kai Chen, Amber Thomas, Jigyasa H Tuteja, Xin He, Chuan He, Kevin White
Phenotypic differences within populations and between closely related species are often driven by variation and evolution of gene expression (King and Wilson 1975; Romero et al. 2012; Villar et al. 2014). However, most analyses have focused on the effects of genomic variation at cis-regulatory elements such as promoters and enhancers that control transcriptional activity, and little is understood about the influence of post-transcriptional processes on transcript evolution. Post-transcriptional modification of RNA by N6-methyladenosine (m6A) has been shown to be widespread throughout the transcriptome (Desrosiers et al...
January 4, 2017: Genome Research
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28039490/impaired-fasting-blood-glucose-is-associated-to-cognitive-impairment-and-cerebral-atrophy-in-middle-aged-non-human-primates
#9
Fathia Djelti, Marc Dhenain, Jérémy Terrien, Jean-Luc Picq, Isabelle Hardy, Delphine Champeval, Martine Perret, Esther Schenker, Jacques Epelbaum, Fabienne Aujard
Age-associated cognitive impairment is a major health and social issue because of increasing aged population. Cognitive decline is not homogeneous in humans and the determinants leading to differences between subjects are not fully understood. In middle-aged healthy humans, fasting blood glucose levels in the upper normal range are associated with memory impairment and cerebral atrophy. Due to a close evolutional similarity to Man, non-human primates may be useful to investigate the relationships between glucose homeostasis, cognitive deficits and structural brain alterations...
December 28, 2016: Aging
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28038494/constantin-von-economo-s-last-publication-a-commentary-on-charles-fraipont-s-%C3%A3-volution-c%C3%A3-r%C3%A3-brale
#10
Lazaros C Triarhou
This paper highlights a commentary written by the neurologist Constantin von Economo on a book published by the Belgian paleontologist Charles Fraipont in 1931. The commentary appears to be Economo's last opus, published posthumously in early 1933. The reviewed work deals with the evolution of the brain in primates, hominids and humans, presenting some interesting ideas about the phylogeny of the human cerebral hemispheres in conjunction with the living conditions of the genera in consideration.
December 2016: Acta Medico-historica Adriatica: AMHA
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28030541/tissue-specificity-of-gene-expression-diverges-slowly-between-orthologs-and-rapidly-between-paralogs
#11
Nadezda Kryuchkova-Mostacci, Marc Robinson-Rechavi
The ortholog conjecture implies that functional similarity between orthologous genes is higher than between paralogs. It has been supported using levels of expression and Gene Ontology term analysis, although the evidence was rather weak and there were also conflicting reports. In this study on 12 species we provide strong evidence of high conservation in tissue-specificity between orthologs, in contrast to low conservation between within-species paralogs. This allows us to shed a new light on the evolution of gene expression patterns...
December 2016: PLoS Computational Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28028868/neurometabolic-profiles-of-the-substantia-nigra-and-striatum-of-mptp-intoxicated-common-marmosets-an-in-vivo-proton-mrs-study-at-9-4%C3%A2-t
#12
Hwon Heo, Jae-Bum Ahn, Hyeong Hun Lee, Euna Kwon, Jun-Won Yun, Hyeonjin Kim, Byeong-Cheol Kang
Given the strong coupling between the substantia nigra (SN) and striatum (STR) in the early stage of Parkinson's disease (PD), yet only a few studies reported to date that have simultaneously investigated the neurochemistry of these two brain regions in vivo, we performed longitudinal metabolic profiling in the SN and STR of 1-methyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP)-intoxicated common marmoset monkey models of PD (n = 10) by using proton MRS ((1) H-MRS) at 9.4 T. T2 relaxometry was also performed in the SN by using MRI...
December 28, 2016: NMR in Biomedicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28018626/chimpanzee-fathers-bias-their-behaviour-towards-their-offspring
#13
Carson M Murray, Margaret A Stanton, Elizabeth V Lonsdorf, Emily E Wroblewski, Anne E Pusey
Promiscuous mating was traditionally thought to curtail paternal investment owing to the potential costs of providing care to unrelated infants. However, mounting evidence suggests that males in some promiscuous species can recognize offspring. In primates, evidence for paternal care exists in promiscuous Cercopithecines, but less is known about these patterns in other taxa. Here, we examine two hypotheses for paternal associations with lactating mothers in eastern chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes schweinfurthii): paternal effort, whereby males associate and interact more with their own infants, and mating effort, whereby males invest in mothers and offspring for mating privileges...
November 2016: Royal Society Open Science
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28012463/microchoerus-hookeri-nov-sp-a-new-late-eocene-european-microchoerine-omomyidae-primates-new-insights-on-the-evolution-of-the-genus-microchoerus
#14
Raef Minwer-Barakat, Judit Marigó, Joan Femenias-Gual, Loïc Costeur, Soledad De Esteban-Trivigno, Salvador Moyà-Solà
The study of Eocene primates is crucial for understanding the evolutionary steps undergone by the earliest members of our lineage and the relationships between extinct and extant taxa. Recently, the description of new material from Spain has improved knowledge of European Paleogene primates considerably, particularly regarding microchoerines. Here we describe the remains of Microchoerus from Sossís (late Eocene, Northern Spain), consisting of more than 120 specimens and representing the richest sample of Microchoerus from Spain...
January 2017: Journal of Human Evolution
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28012462/new-sivaladapid-primate-from-lower-siwalik-deposits-surrounding-ramnagar-jammu-and-kashmir-state-india
#15
Christopher C Gilbert, Biren A Patel, N Premjit Singh, Christopher J Campisano, John G Fleagle, Kathleen L Rust, Rajeev Patnaik
Over the past century, numerous vertebrate fossils collected near the town of Ramnagar, India, have proven to be important for understanding the evolution and biogeography of many mammalian groups. Primates from Ramnagar, though rare, include a number of hominoid specimens attributable to Sivapithecus, as well as a single published mandibular fragment preserving the P4-M1 of the Miocene adapoid Sivaladapis palaeindicus. Since 2010, we have renewed fossil prospecting in the Lower Siwalik deposits near Ramnagar in an attempt to better understand the evolution, biogeographic timing, and paleoclimatic context of mammalian radiations in Asia, with a particular focus on primates...
January 2017: Journal of Human Evolution
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28004894/explanations-for-adaptations-just-so-stories-and-limitations-on-evidence-in-evolutionary-biology
#16
Richard J Smith
Explanations of the historical origin of specific individual traits are a key part of the research program in paleontology and evolutionary biology. Why did bipedalism evolve in the human lineage? Why did some dinosaurs and related species have head crests? Why did viviparity evolve in some reptiles? Why did the common ancestor of primates evolve stereoscopic vision, grasping hands and feet, nails instead of claws, and large brains? These are difficult questions. To varying degrees, an explanation must grapple with (1) judgments about changes in fitness that might follow from a change in morphology - without actually observing behavior or measuring reproductive success, (2) the relationship between genes and traits, (3) limitations on doing relevant experiments, (4) the interpretation of causes that are almost certainly contingent, multifactorial, interactive, hierarchical, nonlinear, emergent, and probabilistic rather than deterministic, (5) limited information about variation and ontogeny, (6) a dataset based on the random fortunes of the historical record, including only partial hard-tissue morphology and no soft-tissue morphology, (7) an equally partial and problematic (for example, time-averaged) record of the environment, (8) the compression of all data into a geological time scale that is likely to miss biologically important events or fluctuations, (9) dependence on a process that can only be inferred ("form and even behavior may leave fossil traces, but forces like natural selection do not", (1:130) ) and finally, (10) the assumption of the "adaptationist programme"(2) that the trait in question is in fact an adaptation rather than a consequence of genetic drift, correlated evolution, pleiotropy, exaptation, or other mechanisms...
November 2016: Evolutionary Anthropology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28003448/the-costs-of-a-big-brain-extreme-encephalization-results-in-higher-energetic-demand-and-reduced-hypoxia-tolerance-in-weakly-electric-african-fishes
#17
Kimberley V Sukhum, Megan K Freiler, Robert Wang, Bruce A Carlson
A large brain can offer several cognitive advantages. However, brain tissue has an especially high metabolic rate. Thus, evolving an enlarged brain requires either a decrease in other energetic requirements, or an increase in overall energy consumption. Previous studies have found conflicting evidence for these hypotheses, leaving the metabolic costs and constraints in the evolution of increased encephalization unclear. Mormyrid electric fishes have extreme encephalization comparable to that of primates. Here, we show that brain size varies widely among mormyrid species, and that there is little evidence for a trade-off with organ size, but instead a correlation between brain size and resting oxygen consumption rate...
December 28, 2016: Proceedings. Biological Sciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28003442/the-heritability-of-chimpanzee-and-human-brain-asymmetry
#18
Aida Gómez-Robles, William D Hopkins, Steven J Schapiro, Chet C Sherwood
Human brains are markedly asymmetric in structure and lateralized in function, which suggests a relationship between these two properties. The brains of other closely related primates, such as chimpanzees, show similar patterns of asymmetry, but to a lesser degree, indicating an increase in anatomical and functional asymmetry during hominin evolution. We analysed the heritability of cerebral asymmetry in chimpanzees and humans using classic morphometrics, geometric morphometrics, and quantitative genetic techniques...
December 28, 2016: Proceedings. Biological Sciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27977913/primate-empathy-three-factors-and-their-combinations-for-empathy-related-phenomena
#19
REVIEW
Shinya Yamamoto
Empathy as a research topic is receiving increasing attention, although there seems some confusion on the definition of empathy across different fields. Frans de Waal (de Waal FBM. Putting the altruism back into altruism: the evolution of empathy. Annu Rev Psychol 2008, 59:279-300. doi:10.1146/annurev.psych.59.103006.093625) used empathy as an umbrella term and proposed a comprehensive model for the evolution of empathy with some of its basic elements in nonhuman animals. In de Waal's model, empathy consists of several layers distinguished by required cognitive levels; the perception-action mechanism plays the core role for connecting ourself and others...
December 15, 2016: Wiley Interdisciplinary Reviews. Cognitive Science
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27974564/within-host-evolution-of-simian-arteriviruses-in-crab-eating-macaques
#20
Louise H Moncla, Andrea M Weiler, Gabrielle Barry, Jason T Weinfurter, Jorge M Dinis, Olivia Charlier, Michael Lauck, Adam L Bailey, Victoria Wahl-Jensen, Chase W Nelson, Joshua C Johnson, Yíngyún Caì, Tony L Goldberg, David H O'Connor, Peter B Jahrling, Jens H Kuhn, Thomas C Friedrich
: Simian arteriviruses are a diverse clade of viruses infecting captive and wild nonhuman primates. We recently reported that Kibale red colobus virus 1 (KRCV-1) causes a mild and self-limiting disease in experimentally infected crab-eating macaques, while simian hemorrhagic fever virus (SHFV) causes lethal viral hemorrhagic fever. Here we characterize how these viruses evolved during replication in cell culture and in experimentally infected macaques. During passage in cell culture, 68 substitutions became fixed in the KRCV-1 genome that were localized in open reading frames (ORFs) likely associated with host cell entry and exit...
December 14, 2016: Journal of Virology
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