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primate evolution

Julia Fischer, Tabitha Price
Two core questions in the study of speech evolution are whether nonhuman primate signals should be conceived as referential, and what the role of social cognition is in primate communication. Current evidence suggests that the structure of primate vocalizations is largely innate and related to the affective/motivational state of the caller, with a probabilistic and underdetermined relationship between specific events and calls. Moreover, nonhuman primates do not appear to express or comprehend communicative or informative intent, which is in line with a lack of mental state attribution to others...
October 20, 2016: Neuroscience and Biobehavioral Reviews
Omar Navarro Leija, Sanju Varghese, Mira V Han
Evolutionary constraint for insertions and deletions (indels) is not necessarily equal to constraint for nucleotide substitutions for any given region of a genome. Knowing the variation in indel-specific evolutionary rates across the sequence will aid our understanding of evolutionary constraints on indels, and help us infer how indels have contributed to the evolution of the sequence. However, unlike for nucleotide substitutions, there has been no phylogenetic method that can statistically infer significantly different rates of indels across the sequence space independent of substitution rates...
October 21, 2016: Journal of Molecular Evolution
Sandra A Heldstab, Carel P van Schaik, Karin Isler
Humans stand out among non-aquatic mammals by having both an extremely large brain and a relatively large amount of body fat. To understand the evolution of this human peculiarity we report a phylogenetic comparative study of 120 mammalian species, including 30 primates, using seasonal variation in adult body mass as a proxy of the tendency to store fat. Species that rely on storing fat to survive lean periods are expected to be less active because of higher costs of locomotion and have increased predation risk due to reduced agility...
November 2016: Journal of Human Evolution
Scott N Furlan, Benjamin Watkins, Victor Tkachev, Sarah Cooley, Angela Panoskaltsis-Mortari, Kayla Betz, Melanie Brown, Daniel J Hunt, John B Schell, Katie Zeleski, Alison Yu, Cindy Giver, Edmund Waller, Jeffrey S Miller, Bruce R Blazar, Leslie S Kean
One of the central challenges of transplantation is the development of alloreactivity despite the use of multi-agent immunoprophylaxis. Effective control of this immune-suppression-resistant T cell activation represents one of the key unmet needs in the fields of both solid organ and hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HCT). To address this unmet need, we have used a highly-translational non-human primate model to interrogate the transcriptional signature of T cells during Breakthrough Acute GVHD that occurs in the setting of clinically-relevant immune suppression and compared this to the Hyperacute GVHD, that develops in unprophylaxed or sub-optimally prophylaxed transplant recipients...
October 6, 2016: Blood
Nicholas J White
Relapse may have evolved in malaria as a mechanism to avoid suppression by more virulent species in mixed infections, thereby increasing transmission opportunities. Later evolution of long latency in Plasmodium vivax was a necessary adaptation as early hominins moved to colder areas with shorter mosquito breeding seasons. Genetic diversity was maintained through heterologous hypnozoite activation.
October 12, 2016: Trends in Parasitology
Alex S Hartlage, John M Cullen, Amit Kapoor
Hepaciviruses and pegiviruses constitute two closely related sister genera of the family Flaviviridae. In the past five years, the known phylogenetic diversity of the hepacivirus genera has absolutely exploded. What was once an isolated infection in humans (and possibly other primates) has now expanded to include horses, rodents, bats, colobus monkeys, cows, and, most recently, catsharks, shedding new light on the genetic diversity and host range of hepaciviruses. Interestingly, despite the identification of these many animal and primate hepaciviruses, the equine hepaciviruses remain the closest genetic relatives of the human hepaciviruses, providing an intriguing clue to the zoonotic source of hepatitis C virus...
September 29, 2016: Annual Review of Virology
Barbora Kubenova, Martina Konecna, Bonaventura Majolo, Petr Smilauer, Julia Ostner, Oliver Sch├╝lke
Social knowledge beyond one's direct relationships is a key in successfully manoeuvring the social world. Individuals gather information on the quality of social relationships between their group companions, which has been termed triadic awareness. Evidence of the use of triadic awareness in natural contexts is limited mainly to conflict management. Here we investigated triadic awareness in wild Barbary macaques (Macaca sylvanus) in the context of bridging interactions defined as male-infant-male interactions whereby a male (initiator, holder) presents an infant to another male (receiver, non-holder) in order to initiate an affiliative interaction with that male...
October 12, 2016: Animal Cognition
Piera Filippi
Across a wide range of animal taxa, prosodic modulation of the voice can express emotional information and is used to coordinate vocal interactions between multiple individuals. Within a comparative approach to animal communication systems, I hypothesize that the ability for emotional and interactional prosody (EIP) paved the way for the evolution of linguistic prosody - and perhaps also of music, continuing to play a vital role in the acquisition of language. In support of this hypothesis, I review three research fields: (i) empirical studies on the adaptive value of EIP in non-human primates, mammals, songbirds, anurans, and insects; (ii) the beneficial effects of EIP in scaffolding language learning and social development in human infants; (iii) the cognitive relationship between linguistic prosody and the ability for music, which has often been identified as the evolutionary precursor of language...
2016: Frontiers in Psychology
Dan-Dan He, Yueer Lu, Rachel Gittelman, Yabin Jin, Fei Ling, Akey Joshua
Viral selection pressure has acted on restriction factors that play an important role in the innate immune system by inhibiting the replication of viruses during primate evolution. Tripartite motif-containing (TRIM) family members are some of these restriction factors. It is becoming increasingly clear that gene expression differences, rather than protein-coding regions changes, could play a vital role in the anti-retroviral immune mechanism. Increasingly, recent studies have created genome-scale catalogues of DNase I hypersensitive sites (DHSs), which demark potentially functional regulatory DNA...
October 12, 2016: Proceedings. Biological Sciences
Cristina J Wittkopp, Madison B Adolph, Lily I Wu, Linda Chelico, Michael Emerman
Humans express seven human APOBEC3 proteins, which can inhibit viruses and endogenous retroelements through cytidine deaminase activity. The seven paralogs differ in the potency of their antiviral effects, as well as in their antiviral targets. One APOBEC3, APOBEC3C, is exceptional as it has been found to only weakly block viruses and endogenous retroelements compared to other APOBEC3s. However, our positive selection analyses suggest that APOBEC3C has played a role in pathogen defense during primate evolution...
October 2016: PLoS Pathogens
K V S Hari Kumar, Anurag Garg, N S Ajai Chandra, S P Singh, Rakesh Datta
Voice is one of the advanced features of natural evolution that differentiates human beings from other primates. The human voice is capable of conveying the thoughts into spoken words along with a subtle emotion to the tone. This extraordinary character of the voice in expressing multiple emotions is the gift of God to the human beings and helps in effective interpersonal communication. Voice generation involves close interaction between cerebral signals and the peripheral apparatus consisting of the larynx, vocal cords, and trachea...
September 2016: Indian Journal of Endocrinology and Metabolism
Wanlong Li, Ghana S Challa, Huilan Zhu, Wenjie Wei
Chromosomal rearrangements (CRs) play important roles in karyotype diversity and speciation. While many CR breakpoints have been characterized at the sequence level in yeast, insects and primates, little is known about the structure of evolutionary CR breakpoints in plant genomes, which are much more dynamic in genome size and sequence organization. Here, we report identification of breakpoints of a translocation between chromosome arms 4L and 5L of Triticeae, which is fixed in several species including diploid wheat and rye, by comparative mapping and comparative analysis of the draft genome and chromosome survey sequences of the Triticeae species...
October 11, 2016: G3: Genes—Genomes—Genetics
Mohammed Asmal, Sophie Lane, Meijuan Tian, Gabrielle Nickel, Colin Venner, Brennan Dirk, Jimmy Dikeakos, Corinne Luedemann, Linh Mach, Harikrishnan Balachandran, Adam Buzby, Srinivas Rao, Norman Letvin, Yong Gao, Eric J Arts
For studies on vaccines and therapies for HIV disease, SIV-HIV chimeric viruses harboring the HIV-1 env gene (SHIVenv) remain the best virus in non-human primate models. However, there are still very few SHIVenv viruses that can cause AIDS in non-CD8-depleted animals. In the present study, a recently created CCR5-using SHIVenv_B3 virus with env gene derived from acute/early HIV-1 infections (AHI) successfully established pathogenic infection in macaques. Through a series of investigations on the evolution, mutational profile, and phenotype of the virus and the resultant humoral immune response in infected rhesus macaques, we found that the E32K mutation in the Env C1 domain was associated with macaque pathogenesis, and that the electrostatic interactions in Env may favor E32K at the gp120 N terminus and "lock" the binding to heptad repeat 1 of gp41 in the trimer and produce a SHIVenv with increased fitness and pathogenesis during macaque infections...
October 6, 2016: Virology
Zongmin Du, Xiaoyi Wang
Various types of animal models of plague have been developed, including mice, rats, guinea pigs, and nonhuman primates. Studies have indicated that rodent and nonhuman primate models of pneumonic plague closely resemble the human disease and that the pathologic changes that occur during bubonic plague are very similar in rodents, nonhuman primates, and humans. In this section, the pathological changes caused by Y. pestis in different animal models are described. The bacterium Y. pestis causes deadly plague, whereas the other two closely related enteropathogenic Yersinia species merely cause limited gastrointestinal manifestations...
2016: Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology
Zofia M Sikorska-Piwowska, Antoni L Dawidowicz
The authors examined a large random sample of skulls from two species of macaques: rhesus monkeys and cynomolgus monkeys. The skulls were measured, divided into age and sex groups and thoroughly analysed using statistical methods. The analysis shows that skulls of young rhesuses are considerably more domed, i.e. have better-developed neurocrania, than their adult counterparts. Male and female skulls, on the other hand, were found to be very similar, which means that sexual dimorphism of the rhesus macaque was suppressed...
October 7, 2016: Folia Morphologica (Warsz)
Charles H Janson
There is considerable controversy about the existence, extent and adaptive value of integrated multimodal memory in non-human animals. Building on prior results showing that wild capuchin monkeys in Argentina appear to recall both the location and amount of food at patches they had previously visited, I tested whether they also track and use elapsed time as a basis for decisions about which feeding patches to visit. I presented them with an experimental array of eight feeding sites, at each of which food rewards increased with increasing elapsed time since the previous visit, similar to the pattern of ripe fruit accumulation in natural feeding trees...
October 12, 2016: Proceedings. Biological Sciences
Serena Bianchi, Laura D Reyes, William D Hopkins, Jared P Taglialatela, Chet C Sherwood
Vocal learning is a key property of spoken language, which might also be present in nonhuman primate species, such as chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes), to a limited degree. While understanding the origins of vocal learning in the primate brain may help shed light on the evolution of speech and language, little is still known regarding the neurobiological correlates of vocal flexibility in nonhuman primates. The current study used voxel-based morphometry (VBM) to assess whether the cerebral cortex of captive chimpanzees that learned to voluntarily produce sounds to attract the attention of a human experimenter (attention-getting sounds) differs in grey matter distribution compared to chimpanzees that do not exhibit this behavior...
October 5, 2016: Scientific Reports
Kazuaki Okawa, Misa Ohno, Akinori Kashimura, Masahiro Kimura, Yuki Kobayashi, Masayoshi Sakaguchi, Yasusato Sugahara, Minori Kamaya, Yoshihiro Kino, Peter O Bauer, Fumitaka Oyama
Acidic mammalian chitinase (AMCase) is implicated in asthma, allergic inflammation, and food processing. Little is known about genetic and evolutional regulation of chitinolytic activity of AMCase. Here, we relate human AMCase polymorphisms to the mouse AMCase, and show that the highly active variants encoded by nonsynonymous single-nucleotide polymorphisms (nsSNPs) are consistent with the mouse AMCase sequence. The chitinolytic activity of the recombinant human AMCase was significantly lower than that of the mouse counterpart...
October 4, 2016: Molecular Biology and Evolution
Sacha Heerschop, Hans Zischler, Stefan Merker, Dyah Perwitasari-Farajallah, Christine Driller
PRDM9 is currently the sole speciation gene found in vertebrates causing hybrid sterility probably due to incompatible alleles. Its role in defining the double strand break loci during the meiotic prophase I is crucial for proper chromosome segregation. Therefore, the rapid turnover of the loci determining zinc finger array seems to be causative for incompatibilities. We here investigated the zinc finger domain-containing exon of PRDM9 in 23 tarsiers. Tarsiers, the most basal extant haplorhine primates, exhibit two frameshifting indels at the 5'-end of the array...
October 4, 2016: Scientific Reports
Alastair J M Key
The human hand is unparalleled amongst primates in its ability to manipulate objects forcefully and dexterously. Previous research has predominantly sought to explain the evolution of these capabilities through an adaptive relationship between more modern human-like anatomical features in the upper limb and increased stone tool production and use proficiency. To date, however, we know little about the influence that other manipulatively demanding behaviors may have had upon the evolution of the human hand. The present study addresses one aspect of this deficiency by examining the recruitment of the distal phalanges during a range of manual transportation (i...
2016: PloS One
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