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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28317557/the-role-of-allometry-and-posture-in-the-evolution-of-the-hominin-subaxial-cervical-spine
#1
Mikel Arlegi, Asier Gómez-Olivencia, Lou Albessard, Ignacio Martínez, Antoine Balzeau, Juan Luis Arsuaga, Ella Been
Cervical vertebrae not only protect the spinal cord but also are the insertion and origin points for muscles related to the movement of the head, upper limb, and trunk, among others, and are thus important elements in primate evolution. While previous work has been undertaken on the first two cervical vertebrae, there is a dearth of studies on the subaxial cervical spine in hominines. In this paper, we provide detailed morphological information on two important aspects of the subaxial cervical vertebrae (C3 - C7): mid-sagittal morphology and superior facet orientation...
March 2017: Journal of Human Evolution
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28315475/evolution-of-the-ability-to-modulate-host-chemokine-networks-via-gene-duplication-in-human-cytomegalovirus-hcmv
#2
Jessica A Scarborough, John R Paul, Juliet V Spencer
Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is a widespread pathogen that is particularly skillful at evading immune detection and defense mechanisms, largely due to extensive co-evolution with its host. One aspect of this co-evolution involves the acquisition of virally encoded G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) with homology to the chemokine receptor family. GPCRs are the largest family of cell surface proteins, found in organisms from yeast to humans, and they regulate a variety of cellular processes including development, sensory perception, and immune cell trafficking...
March 14, 2017: Infection, Genetics and Evolution
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28302841/nonhuman-primates-model-language-evolution
#3
EDITORIAL
Julia Fahrenkamp-Uppenbrink
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
March 17, 2017: Science
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28296969/the-traits-of-the-great-calls-in-the-juvenile-and-adolescent-gibbon-males-nomascus-gabriellae
#4
Michal Hradec, Pavel Linhart, Luděk Bartoš, Petra Bolechová
Knowledge about vocal ontogeny and vocal plasticity during ontogeny in primate species is central to understanding the evolution of human speech. Vocalizations in gibbons (Hominoidea) are very interesting and contain complex species- and sex-specific patterns. However, ontogeny of gibbon songs is little studied. Here, we document regular production and ontogenetic changes of female-specific "great call" in 4 immature (2 juvenile-c.a. 3 years old; and 2 adolescent-c.a. 5 years old) males of southern yellow-cheeked gibbon (N...
2017: PloS One
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28281099/tool-use-by-amazonian-capuchin-monkeys-during-predation-on-caiman-nests-in-a-high-productivity-forest
#5
Kelly Torralvo, Rafael M Rabelo, Alfredo Andrade, Robinson Botero-Arias
Descriptions of new tool-use events are important for understanding how ecological context may drive the evolution of tool use among primate traditions. Here, we report a possible case of the first record of tool use by wild Amazonian capuchin monkeys (Sapajus macrocephalus). The record was made by a camera trap, while we were monitoring caiman nest predation at Mamirauá Reserve in Central Amazonia. An adult individual was registered in a bipedal posture, apparently using a branch as a shovel to dig eggs out of a nest...
March 9, 2017: Primates; Journal of Primatology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28280597/testing-the-adaptive-radiation-hypothesis-for-the-lemurs-of-madagascar
#6
James P Herrera
Lemurs, the diverse, endemic primates of Madagascar, are thought to represent a classic example of adaptive radiation. Based on the most complete phylogeny of living and extinct lemurs yet assembled, I tested predictions of adaptive radiation theory by estimating rates of speciation, extinction and adaptive phenotypic evolution. As predicted, lemur speciation rate exceeded that of their sister clade by nearly twofold, indicating the diversification dynamics of lemurs and mainland relatives may have been decoupled...
January 2017: Royal Society Open Science
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28278215/dietary-diversity-feeding-selectivity-and-responses-to-fruit-scarcity-of-two-sympatric-bornean-primates-hylobates-albibarbis-and-presbytis-rubicunda-rubida
#7
Dena J Clink, Christopher Dillis, Katie L Feilen, Lydia Beaudrot, Andrew J Marshall
Effectively characterizing primate diets is fundamental to understanding primate behavior, ecology and morphology. Examining temporal variation in a species' diet, as well as comparing the responses of different species to variation in resource availability, can enhance understanding of the evolution of morphology and socioecology. In this study, we use feeding data collected over five years to describe the diets of two sympatric Southeast Asian primate species of similar body size: white-bearded gibbons (Hylobates albibarbis) and red leaf monkeys (Presbytis rubicunda rubida), in Gunung Palung National Park, West Kalimantan, Indonesia...
2017: PloS One
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28274887/bayesian-inference-reveals-ancient-origin-of-simian-foamy-virus-in-orangutans
#8
Michael J C Reid, William M Switzer, Michael A Schillaci, Amy R Klegarth, Ellsworth Campbell, Manon Ragonnet, Isabelle Joanisse, Kyna Caminiti, Carl A Lowenberger, Birute Mary F Galdikas, Hope Hollocher, Paul A Sandstrom, James I Brooks
Simian foamy viruses (SFVs) infect most nonhuman primate species and appears to co-evolve with its hosts. This co-evolutionary signal is particularly strong among great apes, including orangutans (genus Pongo). Previous studies have identified three distinct orangutan SFV clades. The first of these three clades is composed of SFV from P. abelii from Sumatra, the second consists of SFV from P. pygmaeus from Borneo, while the third clade is mixed, comprising an SFV strain found in both species of orangutan. The existence of the mixed clade has been attributed to an expansion of P...
March 5, 2017: Infection, Genetics and Evolution
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28267239/the-transcriptome-of-the-avian-malaria-parasite-plasmodium-ashfordi-displays-host-specific-gene-expression
#9
Elin Videvall, Charlie K Cornwallis, Dag Ahrén, Vaidas Palinauskas, Gediminas Valkiūnas, Olof Hellgren
Malaria parasites (Plasmodium spp.) include some of the world's most widespread and virulent pathogens. Our knowledge of the molecular mechanisms these parasites use to invade and exploit hosts other than mice and primates is, however, extremely limited. It is therefore imperative to characterize transcriptome-wide gene expression from non-model malaria parasites and how this varies across host individuals. Here, we used high-throughput Illumina RNA-sequencing on blood from wild-caught Eurasian siskins experimentally infected with a clonal strain of the avian malaria parasite Plasmodium ashfordi (lineage GRW2)...
March 7, 2017: Molecular Ecology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28264649/segmental-duplications-and-evolutionary-acquisition-of-uv-damage-response-in-the-spata31-gene-family-of-primates-and-humans
#10
Cemalettin Bekpen, Sven Künzel, Chen Xie, Muthukrishnan Eaaswarkhanth, Yen-Lung Lin, Omer Gokcumen, Cezmi A Akdis, Diethard Tautz
BACKGROUND: Segmental duplications are an abundant source for novel gene functions and evolutionary adaptations. This mechanism of generating novelty was very active during the evolution of primates particularly in the human lineage. Here, we characterize the evolution and function of the SPATA31 gene family (former designation FAM75A), which was previously shown to be among the gene families with the strongest signal of positive selection in hominoids. The mouse homologue for this gene family is a single copy gene expressed during spermatogenesis...
March 6, 2017: BMC Genomics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28261454/howler-monkey-foraging-ecology-suggests-convergent-evolution-of-routine-trichromacy-as-an-adaptation-for-folivory
#11
Amanda D Melin, Vishal Khetpal, Yuka Matsushita, Kaile Zhou, Fernando A Campos, Barbara Welker, Shoji Kawamura
Primates possess remarkably variable color vision, and the ecological and social factors shaping this variation remain heavily debated. Here, we test whether central tenants of the folivory hypothesis of routine trichromacy hold for the foraging ecology of howler monkeys. Howler monkeys (genus Alouatta) and paleotropical primates (Parvorder: Catarrhini) have independently acquired routine trichromacy through fixation of distinct mid- to long-wavelength-sensitive (M/LWS) opsin genes on the X-chromosome. The presence of routine trichromacy in howlers, while other diurnal neotropical monkeys (Platyrrhini) possess polymorphic trichromacy, is poorly understood...
March 2017: Ecology and Evolution
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28257906/comparative-and-evolutionary-studies-of-mammalian-arylsulfatase-and-sterylsulfatase-genes-and-proteins-encoded-on-the-x-chromosome
#12
Roger S Holmes
At least 19 sulfatase genes have been reported on the human genome, including four arylsulfatase (ARS) genes (ARSD; ARSE; ARSF; ARSH) and a sterylsulfatase (STS) gene located together on the X-chromosome. Bioinformatic analyses of mammalian genomes were undertaken using known human STS and ARS amino acid sequences to study the evolution of these genes and proteins encoded on eutherian and marsupial genomes. Several domain regions and key residues were conserved including signal peptides, active site residues, metal (Ca(2+)) and substrate binding sequences, transmembranes and N-glycosylation sites...
February 24, 2017: Computational Biology and Chemistry
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28250339/the-evolutionary-appearance-of-signaling-motifs-in-pgrmc1
#13
Michael A Cahill
A complex PGRMC1-centred regulatory system controls multiple cell functions. Although PGRMC1 is phosphorylated at several positions, we do not understand the mechanisms regulating its function. PGRMC1 is the archetypal member of the membrane associated progesterone receptor (MAPR) family. Phylogentic comparison of MAPR proteins suggests that the ancestral metazoan "PGRMC-like" MAPR gene resembled PGRMC1/PGRMC2, containing the equivalents of PGRMC1 Y139 and Y180 SH2 target motifs. It later acquired a CK2 site with phosphoacceptor at S181...
February 28, 2017: Bioscience Trends
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28242298/the-alu-neurodegeneration-hypothesis-a-primate-specific-mechanism-for-neuronal-transcription-noise-mitochondrial-dysfunction-and%C3%A2-manifestation-of-neurodegenerative-disease
#14
Peter A Larsen, Michael W Lutz, Kelsie E Hunnicutt, Mirta Mihovilovic, Ann M Saunders, Anne D Yoder, Allen D Roses
It is hypothesized that retrotransposons have played a fundamental role in primate evolution and that enhanced neurologic retrotransposon activity in humans may underlie the origin of higher cognitive function. As a potential consequence of this enhanced activity, it is likely that neurons are susceptible to deleterious retrotransposon pathways that can disrupt mitochondrial function. An example is observed in the TOMM40 gene, encoding a β-barrel protein critical for mitochondrial preprotein transport. Primate-specific Alu retrotransposons have repeatedly inserted into TOMM40 introns, and at least one variant associated with late-onset Alzheimer's disease originated from an Alu insertion event...
February 24, 2017: Alzheimer's & Dementia: the Journal of the Alzheimer's Association
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28223401/transcriptome-analyses-of-rhesus-monkey-pre-implantation-embryos-reveal-a-reduced-capacity-for-dna-double-strand-break-repair-in-primate-oocytes-and-early-embryos
#15
Xinyi Wang, Denghui Liu, Dajian He, Shengbo Suo, Xian Xia, Xiechao He, Jing-Dong Han, Ping Zheng
Pre-implantation embryogenesis encompasses several critical events including genome reprogramming, zygotic genome activation (ZGA), and cell fate commitment, most of which remain mechanistically unclear in primates. In addition, primates display a high rate of embryo wastage without any clear molecular basis. Understanding the factors involved in genome reprogramming and ZGA will help the generation of induced pluripotent stem cells with high efficiency. Moreover, explaining the molecular basis responsible for embryo wastage in primates will greatly expand our knowledge of species evolution...
February 21, 2017: Genome Research
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28208702/the-glutamate-dehydrogenase-pathway-and-its-roles-in-cell-and-tissue-biology-in-health-and-disease
#16
REVIEW
Andreas Plaitakis, Ester Kalef-Ezra, Dimitra Kotzamani, Ioannis Zaganas, Cleanthe Spanaki
Glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) is a hexameric enzyme that catalyzes the reversible conversion of glutamate to α-ketoglutarate and ammonia while reducing NAD(P)⁺ to NAD(P)H. It is found in all living organisms serving both catabolic and anabolic reactions. In mammalian tissues, oxidative deamination of glutamate via GDH generates α-ketoglutarate, which is metabolized by the Krebs cycle, leading to the synthesis of ATP. In addition, the GDH pathway is linked to diverse cellular processes, including ammonia metabolism, acid-base equilibrium, redox homeostasis (via formation of fumarate), lipid biosynthesis (via oxidative generation of citrate), and lactate production...
February 8, 2017: Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28202622/the-hypertension-pandemic-an-evolutionary-perspective
#17
REVIEW
Bernard C Rossier, Murielle Bochud, Olivier Devuyst
Hypertension affects over 1.2 billion individuals worldwide and has become the most critical and expensive public health problem. Hypertension is a multifactorial disease involving environmental and genetic factors together with risk-conferring behaviors. The cause of the disease is identified in ∼10% of the cases (secondary hypertension), but in 90% of the cases no etiology is found (primary or essential hypertension). For this reason, a better understanding of the mechanisms controlling blood pressure in normal and hypertensive patients is the aim of very active experimental and clinical research...
March 2017: Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28202600/neoteny-prolongation-of-youth-from-naked-mole-rats-to-naked-apes-humans
#18
REVIEW
Vladimir P Skulachev, Susanne Holtze, Mikhail Y Vyssokikh, Lora E Bakeeva, Maxim V Skulachev, Alexander V Markov, Thomas B Hildebrandt, Viktor A Sadovnichii
It has been suggested that highly social mammals, such as naked mole rats and humans, are long-lived due to neoteny (the prolongation of youth). In both species, aging cannot operate as a mechanism facilitating natural selection because the pressure of this selection is strongly reduced due to 1) a specific social structure where only the "queen" and her "husband(s)" are involved in reproduction (naked mole rats) or 2) substituting fast technological progress for slow biological evolution (humans). Lists of numerous traits of youth that do not disappear with age in naked mole rats and humans are presented and discussed...
April 2017: Physiological Reviews
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28202470/the-effect-of-foot-posture-on-capacity-to-apply-free-moments-to-the-ground-implications-for-fighting-performance-in-great-apes
#19
David R Carrier, Christopher Cunningham
In contrast to most other primates, great apes have feet in which the heel supports body weight during standing, walking and running. One possible advantage of this plantigrade foot posture is that it may enhance fighting performance by increasing the ability to apply free moments (i.e. force couples) to the ground. We tested this possibility by measuring performance of human subjects when performing from plantigrade and digitigrade (standing on the ball of the foot and toes) postures. We found that plantigrade posture substantially increased the capacity to apply free moments to the ground and to perform a variety of behaviors that are likely to be important to fighting performance in great apes...
February 15, 2017: Biology Open
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28197415/pharmacoinformatics-adaptive-evolution-and-elucidation-of-six-novel-compounds-for-schizophrenia-treatment-by-targeting-daoa-g72-isoforms
#20
Sheikh Arslan Sehgal
Studies on Schizophrenia so far reveal a complex picture of neurological malfunctioning reported to be strongly associated with DAOA. Detailed sequence analyses proved DAOA as a primate specific gene having conserved gene desert region on both upstream and downstream region. The analyses of 10 MB chromosomal region of primates, birds, rodents, and reptiles having DAOA evidenced the conserved part in primates and in the rest of species, while DAOA is only present in primates. DAOA has four isoforms having one interaction partner DAO...
2017: BioMed Research International
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