keyword
MENU ▼
Read by QxMD icon Read
search

primate evolution

keyword
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28435875/mandrills-use-olfaction-to-socially-avoid-parasitized-conspecifics
#1
Clémence Poirotte, François Massol, Anaïs Herbert, Eric Willaume, Pacelle M Bomo, Peter M Kappeler, Marie J E Charpentier
The evolutionary transition from a solitary to a social lifestyle entails an elevated parasite cost because the social proximity associated with group living favors parasite transmission. Despite this cost, sociality is widespread in a large range of taxonomic groups. In this context, hosts would be expected to have evolved behavioral mechanisms to reduce the risk of parasite infection. Few empirical studies have focused on the influence of pathogen-mediated selection on the evolution of antiparasitic behavior in wild vertebrates...
April 2017: Science Advances
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28434690/assessment-of-potential-mirna-biomarkers-of-vero-cell-tumorigenicity-in-a-new-line-agmk1-9t7-of-african-green-monkey-kidney-cells
#2
Belete Teferedegne, Daniel M Rotroff, Juliete Macauley, Gideon Foseh, Gladys Lewis, Alison Motsinger-Rief, Andrew M Lewis
Patterns of microRNA expression appear to delineate the process of spontaneous neoplastic development-transformation (SPNDT) occurring in the African green monkey kidney (AGMK) VERO cell line (Teferedegne et al., 2010). Analysis of microarray data identified 6 microRNAs whose high-level of expression peaked when the World Health Organization 10-87 VERO cells became tumorigenic at passage (p) 190. Six miRNAs were identified as potential biomarkers for the expression of the VERO-cell tumorigenic phenotype (Teferedegne et al...
April 20, 2017: Vaccine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28434536/scaling-of-rotational-inertia-of-primate-mandibles
#3
Callum F Ross, Jose Iriarte-Diaz, Ellen Platts, Treva Walsh, Liam Heins, Geoffrey E Gerstner, Andrea B Taylor
The relative importance of pendulum mechanics and muscle mechanics in chewing dynamics has implications for understanding the optimality criteria driving the evolution of primate feeding systems. The Spring Model (Ross et al., 2009b), which modeled the primate chewing system as a forced mass-spring system, predicted that chew cycle time would increase faster than was actually observed. We hypothesized that if mandibular momentum plays an important role in chewing dynamics, more accurate estimates of the rotational inertia of the mandible would improve the accuracy with which the Spring Model predicts the scaling of primate chew cycle period...
May 2017: Journal of Human Evolution
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28431000/left-brain-asymmetry-of-the-planum-temporale-in-a-nonhominid-primate-redefining-the-origin-of-brain-specialization-for-language
#4
Damien Marie, Muriel Roth, Romain Lacoste, Bruno Nazarian, Alice Bertello, Jean-Luc Anton, William D Hopkins, Konstantina Margiotoudi, Scott A Love, Adrien Meguerditchian
The planum temporale (PT) is a critical region of the language functional network in the human brain showing a striking size asymmetry toward the left hemisphere. Historically considered as a structural landmark of the left-brain specialization for language, a similar anatomical bias has been described in great apes but never in monkeys-indicating that this brain landmark might be unique to Hominidae evolution. In the present in vivo magnetic resonance imaging study, we show clearly for the first time in a nonhominid primate species, an Old World monkey, a left size predominance of the PT among 96 olive baboons (Papio anubis), using manual delineation of this region in each individual hemisphere...
April 19, 2017: Cerebral Cortex
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28430100/discovery-of-african-bat-polyomaviruses-and-infrequent-recombination-in-the-large-t-antigen-in-the-polyomaviridae
#5
Michael Carr, Gabriel Gonzalez, Michihito Sasaki, Kimihito Ito, Akihiro Ishii, Bernard M Hang'ombe, Aaron S Mweene, Yasuko Orba, Hirofumi Sawa
Bat species represent natural reservoirs for a number of high-consequence human pathogens. The present study investigated the diversity of polyomaviruses (PyVs) in Zambian insectivorous and fruit bat species. We describe the complete genomes from four newly proposed African bat PyV species employing the recently recommended criteria provided by the Polyomaviridae Study Group of the International Committee on Taxonomy of Viruses. A comprehensive phylogenetic and recombination analysis was performed to determine genetic relationships and the distribution of recombination events in PyV from mammalian and avian species...
April 22, 2017: Journal of General Virology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28429568/the-evolutionary-radiation-of-plesiadapiforms
#6
Mary T Silcox, Jonathan I Bloch, Doug M Boyer, Stephen G B Chester, Sergi López-Torres
Very shortly after the disappearance of the non-avian dinosaurs, the first mammals that had features similar to those of primates started appearing. These first primitive forms went on to spawn a rich diversity of plesiadapiforms, often referred to as archaic primates. Like many living primates, plesiadapiforms were small arboreal animals that generally ate fruit, insects, and, occasionally, leaves. However, this group lacked several diagnostic features of euprimates. They also had extraordinarily diverse specializations, represented in eleven families and more than 140 species, which, in some cases, were like nothing seen since in the primate order...
April 2017: Evolutionary Anthropology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28423240/biochemical-cellular-physiological-and-pathological-consequences-of-human-loss-of-n-glycolylneuraminic-acid
#7
Jonathan Okerblom, Ajit Varki
About 2-3 million years ago, Alu-mediated deletion of a critical exon in the CMAH gene became fixed in the hominin lineage ancestral to humans, possibly through a stepwise process of selection by pathogen targeting of the CMAH product (the sialic acid Neu5Gc), followed by reproductive isolation via female anti-Neu5Gc antibodies. Loss of CMAH has occurred independently in some other lineages, but is functionally intact in Old World primates, including our closest relatives, the chimpanzees. While the biophysical and biochemical ramifications of losing tens of millions of Neu5Gc hydroxyl groups at most cell surfaces remains poorly understood, there are multi-scale effects functionally relevant to both sides of the host-pathogen interface...
April 19, 2017: Chembiochem: a European Journal of Chemical Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28419279/primates-lice-and-bacteria-speciation-and-genome-evolution-in-the-symbionts-of-hominid-lice
#8
Bret M Boyd, Julie M Allen, Nam-Phuong Nguyen, Pranjal Vachaspati, Zach Quicksall, Tandy Warnow, Lawrence Mugisha, Kevin P Johnson, David L Reed
Insects with restricted diets rely on symbiotic bacteria to provide essential metabolites missing in their diet. The blood-sucking lice are obligate, host-specific parasites of mammals and are themselves host to symbiotic bacteria. In human lice, these bacterial symbionts supply the lice with B-vitamins. Here we sequenced the genomes of symbiotic and heritable bacterial of human, chimpanzee, gorilla, and monkey lice and used phylogenomics to investigate their evolutionary relationships. We find that these symbionts have a phylogenetic history reflecting the louse phylogeny, a finding contrary to previous reports of symbiont replacement...
April 14, 2017: Molecular Biology and Evolution
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28406564/neonatal-shoulder-width-suggests-a-semirotational-oblique-birth-mechanism-in-australopithecus-afarensis
#9
Jeremy M DeSilva, Natalie M Laudicina, Karen R Rosenberg, Wenda R Trevathan
Birth mechanics in early hominins are often reconstructed based on cephalopelvic proportions, with little attention paid to neonatal shoulders. Here, we find that neonatal biacromial breadth can be estimated from adult clavicular length (R(2) = 0.80) in primates. Using this relationship and clavicular length from adult Australopithecus afarensis, we estimate biacromial breadth in neonatal australopiths. Combined with neonatal head dimensions, we reconstruct birth in A. afarensis (A.L. 288-1 or Lucy) and find that the most likely mechanism of birth in this early hominin was a semi-rotational oblique birth in which the head engaged and passed through the inlet transversely, but then rotated so that the head and shoulders remained perpendicular and progressed through the midplane and outlet oblique to the main axis of the female pelvis...
May 2017: Anatomical Record: Advances in Integrative Anatomy and Evolutionary Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28401457/comparative-studies-of-vertebrate-iduronate-2-sulfatase-ids-genes-and-proteins-evolution-of-a-mammalian-x-linked-gene
#10
REVIEW
Roger S Holmes
IDS is responsible for the lysosomal degradation of heparan sulfate and dermatan sulfate and linked to an X-linked lysosomal storage disease, mucopolysaccharidosis 2 (MPS2), resulting in neurological damage and early death. Comparative IDS amino acid sequences and structures and IDS gene locations were examined using data from several vertebrate genome projects. Vertebrate IDS sequences shared 60-99% identities with each other. Human IDS showed 47% sequence identity with fruit fly (Drosophila melanogaster) IDS...
May 2017: 3 Biotech
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28400206/elucidation-of-developmental-patterns-of-marmoset-corpus-callosum-through-a-comparative-mri-in-marmosets-chimpanzees-and-humans
#11
Tomoko Sakai, Yuji Komaki, Junichi Hata, Junko Okahara, Norio Okahara, Takashi Inoue, Akichika Mikami, Mie Matsui, Kenichi Oishi, Erika Sasaki, Hideyuki Okano
The corpus callosum (CC) is present in all primate brains and is the major white matter tract connecting the cerebral hemispheres for integration of sensory, motor and higher-order cognitive information. The midsagittal area of the CC has frequently been used as a sensitive biomarker of brain development. Although the marmoset has been considered as an alternative non-human primate model for neuroscience research, the developmental patterns of the CC have not been explored. The present longitudinal study of magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated that marmosets show a rapid increase of CC during infancy, followed by a slow increase during the juvenile stage, as observed in chimpanzees and humans...
April 8, 2017: Neuroscience Research
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28399212/fossilized-mammalian-erythrocytes-associated-with-a-tick-reveal-ancient-piroplasms
#12
George Poinar
Ticks transmit a variety of pathogenic organisms to vertebrates, especially mammals. The fossil record of such associations is extremely rare. An engorged nymphal tick of the genus Ambylomma in Dominican amber was surrounded by erythrocytes from its mammalian host. Some of the exposed erythrocytes contained developmental stages of a hemoprotozoan resembling members of the Order Piroplasmida. The fossil piroplasm is described, its stages compared with those of extant piroplasms, and reasons provided why the mammalian host could have been a primate...
March 20, 2017: Journal of Medical Entomology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28397252/is-sporadic-alzheimer-s-disease-a-developmental-disorder
#13
Thomas Arendt, Jens Stieler, Uwe Ueberham
Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder of higher age that specifically occurs in human. Its clinical phase, characterized by a decline in physiological, psychological and social functioning, is preceded by a long clinically silent phase of at least several decades that might perhaps even start very early in life. Overall, key functional abilities decline in AD patients in reverse order of the development of these abilities during childhood and adolescence. Early symptoms of AD, thus, typically affect mental functions that have been acquired only during very recent hominid evolution and as such are specific to human...
April 11, 2017: Journal of Neurochemistry
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28391320/evidence-of-a-conserved-molecular-response-to-selection-for-increased-brain-size-in-primates
#14
Amy M Boddy, Peter W Harrison, Stephen H Montgomery, Jason A Caravas, Mary Ann Raghanti, Kimberley A Phillips, Nicholas I Mundy, Derek E Wildman
The adaptive significance of human brain evolution has been frequently studied through comparisons with other primates. However, the evolution of increased brain size is not restricted to the human lineage but is a general characteristic of primate evolution. Whether or not these independent episodes of increased brain size share a common genetic basis is unclear. We sequenced and de novo assembled the transcriptome from the neocortical tissue of the most highly encephalized nonhuman primate, the tufted capuchin monkey (Cebus apella)...
March 1, 2017: Genome Biology and Evolution
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28389720/superoxide-dismutase-1-is-positively-selected-to-minimize-protein-aggregation-in-great-apes
#15
Pouria Dasmeh, Kasper P Kepp
Positive (adaptive) selection has recently been implied in human superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1), a highly abundant antioxidant protein with energy signaling and antiaging functions, one of very few examples of direct selection on a human protein product (exon); the molecular drivers of this selection are unknown. We mapped 30 extant SOD1 sequences to the recently established mammalian species tree and inferred ancestors, key substitutions, and signatures of selection during the protein's evolution. We detected elevated substitution rates leading to great apes (Hominidae) at ~1 per 2 million years, significantly higher than in other primates and rodents, although these paradoxically generally evolve much faster...
April 7, 2017: Cellular and Molecular Life Sciences: CMLS
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28383997/full-genome-characterization-of-a-new-simian-immune-deficiency-virus-lineage-in-a-naturally-infected-cercopithecus-ascanius-whitesidei-in-the-democratic-republic-of-congo-reveals-high-genetic-diversity-among-red-tailed-monkeys-in-central-and-eastern-africa
#16
Steve Ahuka-Mundeke, Placide Mbala-Kingebeni, Simon-Pierre Ndimbo-Kumogo, Caroline Foncelle, Octavie Lunguya-Metila, Jean-Jacques Muyembe-Tamfum, Eric Delaporte, Martine Peeters, Ahidjo Ayouba
Our knowledge on simian immune deficiency virus (SIV) diversity and evolution in the different nonhuman primate species is still incomplete. In this study, we report the full genome characterization of a new SIV from a red-tailed monkey (2013DRC-I8), from the Cercopithecus ascanius whitesidei subspecies, in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC). The new full-length genome is 9,926 bp long, and the genomic structure is similar to that of other SIVs with the absence of vpx and vpu genes. The new SIVasc-13DRC-I8 strain fell within the Cercopithecus specific SIV lineage...
April 6, 2017: AIDS Research and Human Retroviruses
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28382515/evolutionary-and-polymorphism-analyses-reveal-the-central-role-of-btn3a2-in-the-concerted-evolution-of-the-btn3-gene-family
#17
Hassnae Afrache, Pierre Pontarotti, Laurent Abi-Rached, Daniel Olive
The butyrophilin 3 (BTN3) receptors are implicated in the T lymphocytes regulation and present a wide plasticity in mammals. In order to understand how these genes have been diversified, we studied their evolution and show that the three human BTN3 are the result of two successive duplications in Primates and that the three genes are present in Hominoids and the Old World Monkey groups. A thorough phylogenetic analysis reveals a concerted evolution of BTN3 characterized by a strong and recurrent homogenization of the region encoding the signal peptide and the immunoglobulin variable (IgV) domain in Hominoids, where the sequences of BTN3A1 or BTN3A3 are replaced by BTN3A2 sequence...
April 5, 2017: Immunogenetics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28379570/gene-tree-discordance-does-not-explain-away-the-temporal-decline-of-convergence-in-mammalian-protein-sequence-evolution
#18
Zhengting Zou, Jianzhi Zhang
Several authors reported lower frequencies of protein sequence convergence between more distantly related evolutionary lineages and attributed this trend to epistasis, which renders the acceptable amino acids at a site more different and convergence less likely in more divergent lineages. A recent primate study, however, suggested that this trend is at least partially and potentially entirely an artifact of gene tree discordance (GTD). Here we demonstrate in a genome-wide dataset from 17 mammals that the temporal trend remains (1) upon the control of the GTD level, (2) in genes whose genealogies are concordant with the species tree, and (3) for convergent changes, which are extremely unlikely to be caused by GTD...
April 3, 2017: Molecular Biology and Evolution
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28369510/antagonistic-coevolution-of-mer-tyrosine-kinase-expression-and-function
#19
Amanda L Evans, Jack W D Blackburn, Kyle Taruc, Angela Kipp, Brennan S Dirk, Nina R Hunt, Stephen D Barr, Jimmy D Dikeakos, Bryan Heit
TYRO3, AXL, and MERTK (TAM) receptors are a family of receptor tyrosine kinases that maintain homeostasis through the clearance of apoptotic cells, and when defective, contribute to chronic inflammatory and autoimmune diseases such as atherosclerosis, multiple sclerosis, systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis, and Crohn's disease. In addition, certain enveloped viruses utilize TAM receptors for immune evasion and entry into host cells, with several viruses preferentially hijacking MERTK for these purposes...
March 23, 2017: Molecular Biology and Evolution
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28366198/another-look-at-the-foramen-magnum-in-bipedal-mammals
#20
Gabrielle A Russo, E Christopher Kirk
A more anteriorly positioned foramen magnum evolved in concert with bipedalism at least four times within Mammalia: once in macropodid marsupials, once in heteromyid rodents, once in dipodid rodents, and once in hominoid primates. Here, we expand upon previous research on the factors influencing mammalian foramen magnum position (FMP) and angle with four new analyses. First, we quantify FMP using a metric (basioccipital ratio) not previously examined in a broad comparative sample of mammals. Second, we evaluate the potential influence of relative brain size on both FMP and foramen magnum angle (FMA)...
April 2017: Journal of Human Evolution
keyword
keyword
59114
1
2
Fetch more papers »
Fetching more papers... Fetching...
Read by QxMD. Sign in or create an account to discover new knowledge that matter to you.
Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read
×

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"