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primate evolution

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28533464/the-colours-of-humanity-the-evolution-of-pigmentation-in-the-human-lineage
#1
REVIEW
Nina G Jablonski, George Chaplin
Humans are a colourful species of primate, with human skin, hair and eye coloration having been influenced by a great variety of evolutionary forces throughout prehistory. Functionally naked skin has been the physical interface between the physical environment and the human body for most of the history of the genus Homo, and hence skin coloration has been under intense natural selection. From an original condition of protective, dark, eumelanin-enriched coloration in early tropical-dwelling Homo and Homo sapiens, loss of melanin pigmentation occurred under natural selection as Homo sapiens dispersed into non-tropical latitudes of Africa and Eurasia...
July 5, 2017: Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London. Series B, Biological Sciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28528334/hormones-and-human-and-nonhuman-primate-growth
#2
Robin Miriam Bernstein
The aim of this paper was to review information pertaining to the hormonal regulation of nonhuman primate growth, with specific focus on the growth hormone (GH)-insulin-like growth factor (IGF) axis and adrenal androgens. Hormones of the GH-IGF axis are consistently associated with measures of growth - linear, weight, or both - during the growth period; in adulthood, concentrations of IGF-I, IGF-binding protein-3, and GH-binding protein are not associated with any measures of size. Comparing patterns of dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) and DHEA sulfate (DHEAS) may be especially relevant for understanding whether the childhood stage of growth and development is unique to humans and perhaps other apes...
May 19, 2017: Hormone Research in Pædiatrics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28515726/comparative-analysis-of-immune-checkpoint-molecules-and-their-potential-role-in-the-transmissible-tasmanian-devil-facial-tumor-disease
#3
Andrew S Flies, Nicholas B Blackburn, Alan Bruce Lyons, John D Hayball, Gregory M Woods
Immune checkpoint molecules function as a system of checks and balances that enhance or inhibit immune responses to infectious agents, foreign tissues, and cancerous cells. Immunotherapies that target immune checkpoint molecules, particularly the inhibitory molecules programmed cell death 1 and cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated protein 4 (CTLA-4), have revolutionized human oncology in recent years, yet little is known about these key immune signaling molecules in species other than primates and rodents. The Tasmanian devil facial tumor disease is caused by transmissible cancers that have resulted in a massive decline in the wild Tasmanian devil population...
2017: Frontiers in Immunology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28511559/migrating-microbes-what-pathogens-can-tell-us-about-population-movements-and-human-evolution
#4
Charlotte J Houldcroft, Jean-Baptiste Ramond, Riaan F Rifkin, Simon J Underdown
BACKGROUND: The biology of human migration can be observed from the co-evolutionary relationship with infectious diseases. While many pathogens are brief, unpleasant visitors to human bodies, others have the ability to become life-long human passengers. The story of a pathogen's genetic code may, therefore, provide insight into the history of its human host. The evolution and distribution of disease in Africa is of particular interest, because of the deep history of human evolution in Africa, the presence of a variety of non-human primates, and tropical reservoirs of emerging infectious diseases...
May 16, 2017: Annals of Human Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28510580/disease-associated-mitochondrial-mutations-and-the-evolution-of-primate-mitogenomes
#5
William Corrêa Tavares, Héctor N Seuánez
Several human diseases have been associated with mutations in mitochondrial genes comprising a set of confirmed and reported mutations according to the MITOMAP database. An analysis of complete mitogenomes across 139 primate species showed that most confirmed disease-associated mutations occurred in aligned codon positions and gene regions under strong purifying selection resulting in a strong evolutionary conservation. Only two confirmed variants (7.1%), coding for the same amino acids accounting for severe human diseases, were identified without apparent pathogenicity in non-human primates, like the closely related Bornean orangutan...
2017: PloS One
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28496051/molecular-investigations-of-development-and-diseases-of-the-brain-of-higher-mammals-using-the-ferret
#6
Hiroshi Kawasaki
The brains of higher mammals such as primates and carnivores contain well-developed unique brain structures. Uncovering the physiological functions, developmental mechanisms and evolution of these brain structures would greatly facilitate our understanding of the human brain and its diseases. Although the anatomical and electrophysiological features of these brain structures have been intensively investigated, our knowledge about their molecular bases is still limited. To overcome this limitation, genetic techniques for the brains of carnivores and primates have been established, and molecules whose expression patterns correspond to these brain structures were identified recently...
2017: Proceedings of the Japan Academy. Series B, Physical and Biological Sciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28495649/identification-and-molecular-characterization-of-novel-primate-bocaparvoviruses-from-wild-western-lowland-gorillas-of-moukalaba-doudou-national-park-gabon
#7
Chimene Nze-Nkogue, Masayuki Horie, Shiho Fujita, Eiji Inoue, Etienne-François Akomo-Okoue, Makoto Ozawa, Alfred Ngomanda, Juichi Yamagiwa, Kyoko Tsukiyama-Kohara
Bocaparvoviruses have been studied extensively owing to their ability to cause respiratory illness or gastroenteritis in humans. Some bocaparvoviruses have been detected in non-human primates (gorillas and chimpanzees), but the diversity and evolution of these viruses are not fully understood. In this study, we collected 107 fecal samples from wild western lowland gorillas in Moukalaba-Doudou National Park in Gabon to investigate the presence of bocaparvoviruses. Using a combination of pan-bocaparvovirus PCR and individual identification by microsatellite genotyping, we found that two samples from two apparently healthy infant gorillas were positive for bocaparvovirus...
May 8, 2017: Infection, Genetics and Evolution
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28479979/the-evolution-of-intelligence-in-mammalian-carnivores
#8
REVIEW
Kay E Holekamp, Sarah Benson-Amram
Although intelligence should theoretically evolve to help animals solve specific types of problems posed by the environment, it is unclear which environmental challenges favour enhanced cognition, or how general intelligence evolves along with domain-specific cognitive abilities. The social intelligence hypothesis posits that big brains and great intelligence have evolved to cope with the labile behaviour of group mates. We have exploited the remarkable convergence in social complexity between cercopithecine primates and spotted hyaenas to test predictions of the social intelligence hypothesis in regard to both cognition and brain size...
June 6, 2017: Interface Focus
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28473258/representational-specializations-of-the-hippocampus-in-phylogenetic-perspective
#9
REVIEW
Elisabeth A Murray, Steven P Wise, Kim S Graham
In a major evolutionary transition that occurred more than 520 million years ago, the earliest vertebrates adapted to a life of mobile, predatory foraging guided by distance receptors concentrated on their heads. Vision and olfaction served as the principal sensory systems for guiding their search for nutrients and safe haven. Among their neural innovations, these animals had a telencephalon that included a homologue of the hippocampus. Experiments on goldfish, turtles, lizards, rodents, macaque monkeys and humans have provided insight into the initial adaptive advantages provided by the hippocampus homologue...
May 1, 2017: Neuroscience Letters
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28462042/agerinia-marandati-sp-nov-a-new-early-eocene-primate-from-the-iberian-peninsula-sheds-new-light-on-the-evolution-of-the-genus-agerinia
#10
Joan Femenias-Gual, Raef Minwer-Barakat, Judit Marigó, Miquel Poyatos-Moré, Salvador Moyà-Solà
BACKGROUND: The Eocene was the warmest epoch of the Cenozoic and recorded the appearance of several orders of modern mammals, including the first occurrence of Euprimates. During the Eocene, Euprimates were mainly represented by two groups, adapiforms and omomyiforms, which reached great abundance and diversity in the Northern Hemisphere. Despite this relative abundance, the record of early Eocene primates from the European continent is still scarce and poorly known, preventing the observation of clear morphological trends in the evolution of the group and the establishment of phylogenetic relationships among different lineages...
2017: PeerJ
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28454687/development-of-motor-coordination-during-joint-action-in-mid-childhood
#11
E Satta, S Ferrari-Toniolo, F Visco-Comandini, R Caminiti, A Battaglia-Mayer
The ability to act jointly with others is a hallmark of primate evolution and is fundamental for human development. In recent years, the study of coordination strategies between individuals performing joint actions has received growing attention. However, when, in the course of post-natal development, this cognitive-motor function emerges is still unknown. Here, we studied dyads of peers aged 6 to 9 years, as well as adult subjects, while they performed a task where the same action, namely, exerting hand force on an isometric joystick to move a visual cursor from a central toward a peripheral target, was performed in a "solo" and in a social "cooperative" context...
April 25, 2017: Neuropsychologia
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28435875/mandrills-use-olfaction-to-socially-avoid-parasitized-conspecifics
#12
Clémence Poirotte, François Massol, Anaïs Herbert, Eric Willaume, Pacelle M Bomo, Peter M Kappeler, Marie J E Charpentier
The evolutionary transition from a solitary to a social lifestyle entails an elevated parasite cost because the social proximity associated with group living favors parasite transmission. Despite this cost, sociality is widespread in a large range of taxonomic groups. In this context, hosts would be expected to have evolved behavioral mechanisms to reduce the risk of parasite infection. Few empirical studies have focused on the influence of pathogen-mediated selection on the evolution of antiparasitic behavior in wild vertebrates...
April 2017: Science Advances
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28434690/assessment-of-potential-mirna-biomarkers-of-vero-cell-tumorigenicity-in-a-new-line-agmk1-9t7-of-african-green-monkey-kidney-cells
#13
Belete Teferedegne, Daniel M Rotroff, Juliete Macauley, Gideon Foseh, Gladys Lewis, Alison Motsinger-Rief, Andrew M Lewis
Patterns of microRNA expression appear to delineate the process of spontaneous neoplastic development-transformation (SPNDT) occurring in the African green monkey kidney (AGMK) VERO cell line (Teferedegne et al., 2010). Analysis of microarray data identified 6 microRNAs whose high-level of expression peaked when the World Health Organization 10-87 VERO cells became tumorigenic at passage (p) 190. Six miRNAs were identified as potential biomarkers for the expression of the VERO-cell tumorigenic phenotype (Teferedegne et al...
April 20, 2017: Vaccine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28434536/scaling-of-rotational-inertia-of-primate-mandibles
#14
Callum F Ross, Jose Iriarte-Diaz, Ellen Platts, Treva Walsh, Liam Heins, Geoffrey E Gerstner, Andrea B Taylor
The relative importance of pendulum mechanics and muscle mechanics in chewing dynamics has implications for understanding the optimality criteria driving the evolution of primate feeding systems. The Spring Model (Ross et al., 2009b), which modeled the primate chewing system as a forced mass-spring system, predicted that chew cycle time would increase faster than was actually observed. We hypothesized that if mandibular momentum plays an important role in chewing dynamics, more accurate estimates of the rotational inertia of the mandible would improve the accuracy with which the Spring Model predicts the scaling of primate chew cycle period...
May 2017: Journal of Human Evolution
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28431000/left-brain-asymmetry-of-the-planum-temporale-in-a-nonhominid-primate-redefining-the-origin-of-brain-specialization-for-language
#15
Damien Marie, Muriel Roth, Romain Lacoste, Bruno Nazarian, Alice Bertello, Jean-Luc Anton, William D Hopkins, Konstantina Margiotoudi, Scott A Love, Adrien Meguerditchian
The planum temporale (PT) is a critical region of the language functional network in the human brain showing a striking size asymmetry toward the left hemisphere. Historically considered as a structural landmark of the left-brain specialization for language, a similar anatomical bias has been described in great apes but never in monkeys-indicating that this brain landmark might be unique to Hominidae evolution. In the present in vivo magnetic resonance imaging study, we show clearly for the first time in a nonhominid primate species, an Old World monkey, a left size predominance of the PT among 96 olive baboons (Papio anubis), using manual delineation of this region in each individual hemisphere...
April 19, 2017: Cerebral Cortex
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28430100/discovery-of-african-bat-polyomaviruses-and-infrequent-recombination-in-the-large-t-antigen-in-the-polyomaviridae
#16
Michael Carr, Gabriel Gonzalez, Michihito Sasaki, Kimihito Ito, Akihiro Ishii, Bernard M Hang'ombe, Aaron S Mweene, Yasuko Orba, Hirofumi Sawa
Bat species represent natural reservoirs for a number of high-consequence human pathogens. The present study investigated the diversity of polyomaviruses (PyVs) in Zambian insectivorous and fruit bat species. We describe the complete genomes from four newly proposed African bat PyV species employing the recently recommended criteria provided by the Polyomaviridae Study Group of the International Committee on Taxonomy of Viruses. A comprehensive phylogenetic and recombination analysis was performed to determine genetic relationships and the distribution of recombination events in PyV from mammalian and avian species...
April 2017: Journal of General Virology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28429568/the-evolutionary-radiation-of-plesiadapiforms
#17
Mary T Silcox, Jonathan I Bloch, Doug M Boyer, Stephen G B Chester, Sergi López-Torres
Very shortly after the disappearance of the non-avian dinosaurs, the first mammals that had features similar to those of primates started appearing. These first primitive forms went on to spawn a rich diversity of plesiadapiforms, often referred to as archaic primates. Like many living primates, plesiadapiforms were small arboreal animals that generally ate fruit, insects, and, occasionally, leaves. However, this group lacked several diagnostic features of euprimates. They also had extraordinarily diverse specializations, represented in eleven families and more than 140 species, which, in some cases, were like nothing seen since in the primate order...
April 2017: Evolutionary Anthropology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28423240/biochemical-cellular-physiological-and-pathological-consequences-of-human-loss-of-n-glycolylneuraminic-acid
#18
Jonathan Okerblom, Ajit Varki
About 2-3 million years ago, Alu-mediated deletion of a critical exon in the CMAH gene became fixed in the hominin lineage ancestral to humans, possibly through a stepwise process of selection by pathogen targeting of the CMAH product (the sialic acid Neu5Gc), followed by reproductive isolation via female anti-Neu5Gc antibodies. Loss of CMAH has occurred independently in some other lineages, but is functionally intact in Old World primates, including our closest relatives, the chimpanzees. While the biophysical and biochemical ramifications of losing tens of millions of Neu5Gc hydroxyl groups at most cell surfaces remains poorly understood, there are multi-scale effects functionally relevant to both sides of the host-pathogen interface...
April 19, 2017: Chembiochem: a European Journal of Chemical Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28419279/primates-lice-and-bacteria-speciation-and-genome-evolution-in-the-symbionts-of-hominid-lice
#19
Bret M Boyd, Julie M Allen, Nam-Phuong Nguyen, Pranjal Vachaspati, Zach Quicksall, Tandy Warnow, Lawrence Mugisha, Kevin P Johnson, David L Reed
Insects with restricted diets rely on symbiotic bacteria to provide essential metabolites missing in their diet. The blood-sucking lice are obligate, host-specific parasites of mammals and are themselves host to symbiotic bacteria. In human lice, these bacterial symbionts supply the lice with B-vitamins. Here we sequenced the genomes of symbiotic and heritable bacterial of human, chimpanzee, gorilla, and monkey lice and used phylogenomics to investigate their evolutionary relationships. We find that these symbionts have a phylogenetic history reflecting the louse phylogeny, a finding contrary to previous reports of symbiont replacement...
April 14, 2017: Molecular Biology and Evolution
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28406564/neonatal-shoulder-width-suggests-a-semirotational-oblique-birth-mechanism-in-australopithecus-afarensis
#20
Jeremy M DeSilva, Natalie M Laudicina, Karen R Rosenberg, Wenda R Trevathan
Birth mechanics in early hominins are often reconstructed based on cephalopelvic proportions, with little attention paid to neonatal shoulders. Here, we find that neonatal biacromial breadth can be estimated from adult clavicular length (R(2) = 0.80) in primates. Using this relationship and clavicular length from adult Australopithecus afarensis, we estimate biacromial breadth in neonatal australopiths. Combined with neonatal head dimensions, we reconstruct birth in A. afarensis (A.L. 288-1 or Lucy) and find that the most likely mechanism of birth in this early hominin was a semi-rotational oblique birth in which the head engaged and passed through the inlet transversely, but then rotated so that the head and shoulders remained perpendicular and progressed through the midplane and outlet oblique to the main axis of the female pelvis...
May 2017: Anatomical Record: Advances in Integrative Anatomy and Evolutionary Biology
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