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Cognitive bias and decision making

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28649904/debiasing-health-related-judgments-and-decision-making-a-systematic-review
#1
Ramona Ludolph, Peter J Schulz
BACKGROUND: Being confronted with uncertainty in the context of health-related judgments and decision making can give rise to the occurrence of systematic biases. These biases may detrimentally affect lay persons and health experts alike. Debiasing aims at mitigating these negative effects by eliminating or reducing the biases. However, little is known about its effectiveness. This study seeks to systematically review the research on health-related debiasing to identify new opportunities and challenges for successful debiasing strategies...
June 1, 2017: Medical Decision Making: An International Journal of the Society for Medical Decision Making
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28641601/the-impact-of-traumatic-stress-on-pavlovian-biases
#2
O T Ousdal, Q J Huys, A M Milde, A R Craven, L Ersland, T Endestad, A Melinder, K Hugdahl, R J Dolan
BACKGROUND: Disturbances in Pavlovian valuation systems are reported to follow traumatic stress exposure. However, motivated decisions are also guided by instrumental mechanisms, but to date the effect of traumatic stress on these instrumental systems remain poorly investigated. Here, we examine whether a single episode of severe traumatic stress influences flexible instrumental decisions through an impact on a Pavlovian system. METHODS: Twenty-six survivors of the 2011 Norwegian terror attack and 30 matched control subjects performed an instrumental learning task in which Pavlovian and instrumental associations promoted congruent or conflicting responses...
June 23, 2017: Psychological Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28640035/the-professionalism-and-integrity-in-research-program-description-and-preliminary-outcomes
#3
James M DuBois, John T Chibnall, Raymond Tait, Jillon S Vander Wal
Violations of rules and regulations in research can cause significant problems for human participants, animal subjects, data integrity, institutions, and investigators. The Professionalism and Integrity in Research Program (PI Program) provides remediation training that addresses the root causes of violations of rules and regulations in research. Through assessments, a three-day workshop, and follow-up coaching calls, the PI Program teaches evidence-based decision-making strategies designed to help researchers to compensate for bias, uncertainty, and work-related stress, and foster the skills needed to oversee research projects in today's complex regulatory environments...
June 20, 2017: Academic Medicine: Journal of the Association of American Medical Colleges
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28603756/cognitive-mechanisms-and-therapeutic-targets-of-addiction
#4
Marc L Copersino
Fundamental to cognitive models of addiction is the gradual strengthening of automatic, urge-related responding that develops in tandem with the diminution of self-control-related processes aimed at inhibiting impulses. Recent conceptualizations of addiction also include a third set of cognitive processes related to self-awareness and superordinate regulation of self-control and other higher brain function. This review describes new human research evidence and theoretical developments related to the multicausal strengthening of urge-related responding and failure of self-control in addiction, and the etiology of disrupted self-awareness and rational decision-making associated with continued substance use...
February 2017: Current Opinion in Behavioral Sciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28600924/-only-you-can-play-with-me-children-s-inclusive-decision-making-reasoning-and-emotions-based-on-peers-gender-and-behavior-problems
#5
Joanna Peplak, Ju-Hyun Song, Tyler Colasante, Tina Malti
This study examined the development of children's decisions, reasoning, and emotions in contexts of peer inclusion/exclusion. We asked an ethnically diverse sample of 117 children aged 4years (n=59; 60% girls) and 8years (n=58; 49% girls) to choose between including hypothetical peers of the same or opposite gender and with or without attention deficit/hyperactivity problems and aggressive behavior. Children also provided justifications for, and emotions associated with, their inclusion decisions. Both 4- and 8-year-olds predominantly chose to include the in-group peer (i...
June 7, 2017: Journal of Experimental Child Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28587695/hyper-responsivity-to-losses-in-the-anterior-insula-during-economic-choice-scales-with-depression-severity
#6
J B Engelmann, G S Berns, B W Dunlop
BACKGROUND: Commonly observed distortions in decision-making among patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) may emerge from impaired reward processing and cognitive biases toward negative events. There is substantial theoretical support for the hypothesis that MDD patients overweight potential losses compared with gains, though the neurobiological underpinnings of this bias are uncertain. METHODS: Twenty-one unmedicated patients with MDD were compared with 25 healthy controls (HC) using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) together with an economic decision-making task over mixed lotteries involving probabilistic gains and losses...
June 7, 2017: Psychological Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28572846/legal-and-psychological-considerations-for-obtaining-informed-consent-for-reverse-total-shoulder-arthroplasty
#7
REVIEW
Craig Blackwood, Jen Dixon, Peter Reilly, Roger J Emery
This paper seeks to outline recent legal developments and requirements pertinent to obtaining informed consent. We argue that this is of particular relevance to patients considering a reverse total shoulder arthroplasty, due to the high complication rate associated with this procedure. By examining the cognitive processes involved in decision-making, and other clinician-related factors such as delivery of information, gender bias and conflict of interest, we explore some of the barriers that can undermine the processes of shared decision-making and obtaining genuine informed consent...
January 2017: Shoulder & Elbow
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28546312/prefrontal-dopamine-d1-and-d2-receptors-regulate-dissociable-aspects-of-decision-making-via-distinct-ventral-striatal-and-amygdalar-circuits
#8
Nicole L Jenni, Joshua D Larkin, Stan B Floresco
Mesocortical dopamine (DA) regulates a variety of cognitive functions via actions on D1 and/or D2 receptors. For example, risk/reward decision making is differentially modulated by these two receptors within the prefrontal cortex (PFC), with D2 receptors enabling flexible decision making and D1 receptors promoting persistence in choice biases. Yet, it is unclear how DA mediates opposing patterns of behavior by acting on different receptors within the same terminal region. We explored the possibility that DA may act on separate networks of PFC neurons that are modulated by D1 or D2 receptors and in turn interface with divergent downstream structures, such as the basolateral amygdala (BLA) or nucleus accumbens (NAc)...
May 25, 2017: Journal of Neuroscience: the Official Journal of the Society for Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28536918/-cognitive-errors-in-diagnostic-decision-making
#9
REVIEW
Martin Gäbler
Approximately 10-15% of our diagnostic decisions are faulty and may lead to unfavorable and dangerous outcomes, which could be avoided. These diagnostic errors are mainly caused by cognitive biases in the diagnostic reasoning process.Our medical diagnostic decision-making is based on intuitive "System 1" and analytical "System 2" diagnostic decision-making and can be deviated by unconscious cognitive biases.These deviations can be positively influenced on a systemic and an individual level. For the individual, metacognition (internal withdrawal from the decision-making process) and debiasing strategies, such as verification, falsification and rule out worst-case scenarios, can lead to improved diagnostic decisions making...
May 23, 2017: Wiener Medizinische Wochenschrift
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28521070/drug-therapy-for-symptoms-associated-with-anxiety-in-adult-palliative-care-patients
#10
REVIEW
Susan Salt, Caroline A Mulvaney, Nancy J Preston
BACKGROUND: This is an update of a Cochrane Review first published in 2004 (Issue 1) and previously updated in 2012 (Issue 10). Anxiety is common in palliative care patients. It can be a natural response to the complex uncertainty of having a life-limiting illness or impending death, but it may represent a clinically significant issue in its own right. OBJECTIVES: To assess the effectiveness of drug therapy for treating symptoms of anxiety in adults with a progressive life-limiting illness who are thought to be in their last year of life...
May 18, 2017: Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28516209/foreign-language-effect-and-psychological-distance
#11
Hong Im Shin, Juyoung Kim
Does using a foreign language result in forming different moral decisions than using our mother tongue? Two studies were conducted to investigate whether there is a relationship between foreign language effects (differences between native vs. foreign language conditions) and psychological distance. Study 1 tested four moral dilemmas adapted from Greene et al. (Cognition 107: 1144-1155, 2008). Non-fluent Korean-English bilingual participants (N = 161) indicated decisions regarding four moral dilemmas in either Korean or English languages...
May 17, 2017: Journal of Psycholinguistic Research
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28502553/a-shortened-protocol-for-assessing-cognitive-bias-in-rats
#12
Nichola M Brydges, Lynsey Hall
BACKGROUND: Reliable measurement of affective state in animals is a significant goal of animal welfare. Such measurements would also improve the validity of pre-clinical mental health research which relies on animal models. However, at present, affective states in animals are inaccessible to direct measurement. In humans, changes in cognitive processing can give reliable indications of emotional state. Therefore, similar techniques are increasingly being used to gain proxy measures of affective states in animals...
May 11, 2017: Journal of Neuroscience Methods
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28490292/countering-cognitive-biases-in-minimising-low-value-care
#13
REVIEW
Ian A Scott, Jason Soon, Adam G Elshaug, Robyn Lindner
Cognitive biases in decision making may make it difficult for clinicians to reconcile evidence of overuse with highly ingrained prior beliefs and intuition. Such biases can predispose clinicians towards low value care and may limit the impact of recently launched campaigns aimed at reducing such care. Commonly encountered biases comprise commission bias, illusion of control, impact bias, availability bias, ambiguity bias, extrapolation bias, endowment effects, sunken cost bias and groupthink. Various strategies may be used to counter such biases, including cognitive huddles, narratives of patient harm, value considerations in clinical assessments, defining acceptable levels of risk of adverse outcomes, substitution, reflective practice and role modelling, normalisation of deviance, nudge techniques and shared decision making...
May 15, 2017: Medical Journal of Australia
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28483979/chronic-and-acute-stress-promote-overexploitation-in-serial-decision-making
#14
Jennifer K Lenow, Sara M Constantino, Nathaniel D Daw, Elizabeth A Phelps
Many decisions that humans make resemble foraging problems in which a currently available, known option must be weighed against an unknown alternative option. In such foraging decisions, the quality of the overall environment can be used as a proxy for estimating the value of future unknown options against which current prospects are compared. We hypothesized that such foraging-like decisions would be characteristically sensitive to stress, a physiological response that tracks biologically relevant changes in environmental context...
June 7, 2017: Journal of Neuroscience: the Official Journal of the Society for Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28482278/mania-risk-is-characterized-by-an-aberrant-optimistic-update-bias-for-positive-life-events
#15
Sandra Schönfelder, Johanna Langer, Eva Elisa Schneider, Michèle Wessa
BACKGROUND: Early cognitive models of mania posit that a cognitive triad consisting of unrealistically optimistic beliefs about the self, world and future may predispose vulnerable individuals to develop manic symptoms. Hypomanic personality traits (HYP) pose such a vulnerability factor in the etiopathogenesis of mania. METHODS: To test the cognitive tenet of overly optimistic views of the future, 24 individuals with high-HYP and 24 age- and sex-matched controls (low-HYP) performed a belief update paradigm, during which they estimated their personal chances to experience future positive and negative life events...
April 30, 2017: Journal of Affective Disorders
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28474279/revelation-effects-in-remembering-forecasting-and-perspective-taking
#16
Deanne L Westerman, Jeremy K Miller, Marianne E Lloyd
The revelation effect is a robust phenomenon in episodic memory whereby stimuli that immediately follow a simple cognitive task are more likely to garner positive responses on a variety of memory tests, including autobiographical memory judgments. Six experiments investigated the revelation effect for judgments of past and future events as well as judgments made from others' perspectives. The purpose of this work was to determine whether these subjectively distinct judgments are subject to the same decision-making biases, as might be expected if they are governed by similar processes (e...
May 4, 2017: Memory & Cognition
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28469290/ostracism-reduces-reliance-on-poor-advice-from-others-during-decision-making
#17
Kaileigh A Byrne, Thomas P Tibbett, Lauren N Laserna, Adrienne R Carter-Sowell, Darrell A Worthy
Decision-making is rarely context-free, and often both social information and non-social information are weighed into one's decisions. Incorporating information into a decision can be influenced by previous experiences. Ostracism has extensive effects, including taxing cognitive resources and increasing social monitoring. In decision-making situations, individuals are often faced with both objective and social information and must choose which information to include or filter out. How will ostracism affect the reliance on objective and social information during decision-making? Participants (N=245) in Experiment 1 were randomly assigned to be included or ostracized in a standardized, group task...
October 2016: Journal of Behavioral Decision Making
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28464220/human-factors-effecting-forensic-decision-making-workplace-stress-and-well-being
#18
Amy M Jeanguenat, Itiel E Dror
Over the past decade, there has been a growing openness about the importance of human factors in forensic work. However, most of it focused on cognitive bias, and neglected issues of workplace wellness and stress. Forensic scientists work in a dynamic environment that includes common workplace pressures such as workload volume, tight deadlines, lack of advancement, number of working hours, low salary, technology distractions, and fluctuating priorities. However, in addition, forensic scientists also encounter a number of industry-specific pressures, such as technique criticism, repeated exposure to crime scenes or horrific case details, access to funding, working in an adversarial legal system, and zero tolerance for "errors"...
May 2, 2017: Journal of Forensic Sciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28444507/heuristics-and-bias-in-rectal-surgery
#19
Ewan MacDermid, Christopher J Young, Susan J Moug, Robert G Anderson, Heather L Shepherd
PURPOSE: Deciding to defunction after anterior resection can be difficult, requiring cognitive tools or heuristics. From our previous work, increasing age and risk-taking propensity were identified as heuristic biases for surgeons in Australia and New Zealand (CSSANZ), and inversely proportional to the likelihood of creating defunctioning stomas. We aimed to assess these factors for colorectal surgeons in the British Isles, and identify other potential biases. METHODS: The Association of Coloproctology of Great Britain and Ireland (ACPGBI) was invited to complete an online survey...
April 25, 2017: International Journal of Colorectal Disease
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28430040/foraging-value-risk-avoidance-and-multiple-control-signals-how-the-acc-controls-value-based-decision-making
#20
Joshua W Brown, William H Alexander
Recent work on the role of the ACC in cognition has focused on choice difficulty, action value, risk avoidance, conflict resolution, and the value of exerting control among other factors. A main underlying question is what are the output signals of ACC, and relatedly, what is their effect on downstream cognitive processes? Here we propose a model of how ACC influences cognitive processing in other brain regions that choose actions. The model builds on the earlier Predicted Response Outcome model and suggests that ACC learns to represent specifically the states in which the potential costs or risks of an action are high, on both short and long timescales...
April 21, 2017: Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience
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