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Cognitive bias and decision making

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28811178/acute-%C3%AE-9-tetrahydrocannabinol-administration-in-female-rats-attenuates-immediate-responses-following-losses-but-not-multi-trial-reinforcement-learning-from-wins
#1
Scott A Wong, Sienna H Randolph, Victorita E Ivan, Aaron J Gruber
Δ-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) is the main psychoactive component of marijuana and has potent effects on decision-making, including a proposed reduction in cognitive flexibility. We demonstrate here that acute THC administration differentially affects some of the processes that contribute to cognitive flexibility. Specifically, THC reduces lose-shift responding in which female rats tend to immediately shift choice responses away from options that result in reward omission on the previous trial. THC, however, did not impair the ability of rats to flexibly bias responses toward feeders with higher probability of reward in a reversal task...
August 12, 2017: Behavioural Brain Research
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28802440/debiasing-visual-pilots-weather-related-decision-making
#2
Stephen Walmsley, Andrew Gilbey
Pilots who decide to continue a flight into deteriorating weather conditions, rather than turn back or divert, are a significant cause of fatal crashes in general aviation. Earlier research has suggested that cognitive biases such as the anchoring effect and confirmation bias are implicated in many decisions to continue into worsening weather. In this study, we explored whether a simple debiasing technique, 'considering the alternative', reduced the effect of these two potentially fatal biases. Despite the study being adequately powered, our attempts to reduce the effects of biases were both unsuccessful...
November 2017: Applied Ergonomics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28798411/group-augmentation-in-realistic-visual-search-decisions-via-a-hybrid-brain-computer-interface
#3
Davide Valeriani, Caterina Cinel, Riccardo Poli
Groups have increased sensing and cognition capabilities that typically allow them to make better decisions. However, factors such as communication biases and time constraints can lead to less-than-optimal group decisions. In this study, we use a hybrid Brain-Computer Interface (hBCI) to improve the performance of groups undertaking a realistic visual-search task. Our hBCI extracts neural information from EEG signals and combines it with response times to build an estimate of the decision confidence. This is used to weigh individual responses, resulting in improved group decisions...
August 10, 2017: Scientific Reports
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28753383/quantifying-heuristic-bias-anchoring-availability-and-representativeness
#4
Megan Richie, S Andrew Josephson
Construct: Authors examined whether a new vignette-based instrument could isolate and quantify heuristic bias. BACKGROUND: Heuristics are cognitive shortcuts that may introduce bias and contribute to error. There is no standardized instrument available to quantify heuristic bias in clinical decision making, limiting future study of educational interventions designed to improve calibration of medical decisions. This study presents validity data to support a vignette-based instrument quantifying bias due to the anchoring, availability, and representativeness heuristics...
July 28, 2017: Teaching and Learning in Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28735282/a-systematic-review-of-criteria-used-to-define-recovery-from-sport-related-concussion-in-youth-athletes
#5
REVIEW
Mohammad Nadir Haider, John J Leddy, Sonja Pavlesen, Melissa Kluczynski, John G Baker, Jeffrey C Miecznikowski, Barry S Willer
OBJECTIVE: The Concussion in Sport Group guidelines recommend a multifaceted approach to help clinicians make return to sport decisions. The purpose of this study was to identify the most common multifaceted measures used to define clinical recovery from sport-related concussion in young athletes (high school and/or college level) and to summarise existing knowledge of criteria used to make return to sport decisions. DESIGN: Systematic review. DATA SOURCES: The PubMed (MEDLINE), SPORTDiscus and Embase electronic databases were searched from 1 January 2000 to 1 March 2017 by three independent reviewers...
July 22, 2017: British Journal of Sports Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28734975/how-consumers-are-affected-by-product-descriptions-in-online-shopping-event-related-potentials-evidence-of-the-attribute-framing-effect
#6
Jia Jin, Wuke Zhang, Mingliang Chen
Due to the limitations of the human ability to process information, e-consumers' decisions are likely to be influenced by various cognitive biases, such as the attribute framing effect. This effect has been well studied by numerous scholars; however, the associated underlying neural mechanisms with a critical temporal resolution have not been revealed. Thus, this study applies the measurement of event-related potentials (ERPs) to directly examine the role of attribute framing in information processing and decision-making in online shopping...
July 19, 2017: Neuroscience Research
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28733811/pharmacological-evidence-that-5-ht2c-receptor-blockade-selectively-improves-decision-making-when-rewards-are-paired-with-audiovisual-cues-in-a-rat-gambling-task
#7
Wendy K Adams, Chris Barkus, Jacqueline-Marie N Ferland, Trevor Sharp, Catharine A Winstanley
RATIONALE: Adding reward-concurrent cues to a rat gambling task (rGT) increases risky choice. This cued version of the task may reflect an "addiction-like" cognitive process, more similar to human gambling than the uncued task. Serotonergic drugs that target 5-HT2 receptors alter mechanisms linked to impulse control. However, relatively little is known regarding the impact of such agents on either risky decision making, or the ability of conditioned stimuli to bias the choice process, despite potential relevance to addiction development and treatment...
July 21, 2017: Psychopharmacology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28725188/using-virtual-reality-to-assess-ethical-decisions-in-road-traffic-scenarios-applicability-of-value-of-life-based-models-and-influences-of-time-pressure
#8
Leon R Sütfeld, Richard Gast, Peter König, Gordon Pipa
Self-driving cars are posing a new challenge to our ethics. By using algorithms to make decisions in situations where harming humans is possible, probable, or even unavoidable, a self-driving car's ethical behavior comes pre-defined. Ad hoc decisions are made in milliseconds, but can be based on extensive research and debates. The same algorithms are also likely to be used in millions of cars at a time, increasing the impact of any inherent biases, and increasing the importance of getting it right. Previous research has shown that moral judgment and behavior are highly context-dependent, and comprehensive and nuanced models of the underlying cognitive processes are out of reach to date...
2017: Frontiers in Behavioral Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28696023/mcda-swing-weighting-and-discrete-choice-experiments-for-elicitation-of-patient-benefit-risk-preferences-a-critical-assessment
#9
Tommi Tervonen, Heather Gelhorn, Sumitra Sri Bhashyam, Jiat-Ling Poon, Katharine S Gries, Anne Rentz, Kevin Marsh
PURPOSE: Multiple criteria decision analysis swing weighting (SW) and discrete choice experiments (DCE) are appropriate methods for capturing patient preferences on treatment benefit-risk trade-offs. This paper presents a qualitative comparison of the 2 methods. METHODS: We review and critically assess similarities and differences of SW and DCE based on 6 aspects: comprehension by study participants, cognitive biases, sample representativeness, ability to capture heterogeneity in preferences, reliability and validity, and robustness of the results...
July 11, 2017: Pharmacoepidemiology and Drug Safety
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28694338/no-effect-of-commercial-cognitive-training-on-brain-activity-choice-behavior-or-cognitive-performance
#10
Joseph W Kable, M Kathleen Caulfield, Mary Falcone, Mairead McConnell, Leah Bernardo, Trishala Parthasarathi, Nicole Cooper, Rebecca Ashare, Janet Audrain-McGovern, Robert Hornik, Paul Diefenbach, Frank J Lee, Caryn Lerman
Increased preference for immediate over delayed rewards and for risky over certain rewards has been associated with unhealthy behavioral choices. Motivated by evidence that enhanced cognitive control can shift choice behavior away from immediate and risky rewards, we tested whether training executive cognitive function could influence choice behavior and brain responses. In this randomized controlled trial, 128 young adults (71 male, 57 female) participated in 10 weeks of training with either a commercial web-based cognitive training program or web-based video games that do not specifically target executive function or adapt the level of difficulty throughout training...
August 2, 2017: Journal of Neuroscience: the Official Journal of the Society for Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28676772/executive-functions-of-divers-are-selectively-impaired-at-20-meter-water-depth
#11
Fabian Steinberg, Michael Doppelmayr
Moving and acting underwater within recreational or occupational activities require intact executive functions, since they subserve higher cognitive functions such as successful self-regulation, coping with novel situations, and decision making; all of which could be influenced by nitrogen narcosis due to elevated partial pressure under water. However, specific executive functions that could provide a differentiated view on humans' cognitive performance ability have not yet been systematically analyzed in full-water immersion, which is a research gap addressed within this approach to contribute to a better understanding of nitrogen narcosis...
2017: Frontiers in Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28649904/debiasing-health-related-judgments-and-decision-making-a-systematic-review
#12
Ramona Ludolph, Peter J Schulz
BACKGROUND: Being confronted with uncertainty in the context of health-related judgments and decision making can give rise to the occurrence of systematic biases. These biases may detrimentally affect lay persons and health experts alike. Debiasing aims at mitigating these negative effects by eliminating or reducing the biases. However, little is known about its effectiveness. This study seeks to systematically review the research on health-related debiasing to identify new opportunities and challenges for successful debiasing strategies...
June 1, 2017: Medical Decision Making: An International Journal of the Society for Medical Decision Making
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28641601/the-impact-of-traumatic-stress-on-pavlovian-biases
#13
O T Ousdal, Q J Huys, A M Milde, A R Craven, L Ersland, T Endestad, A Melinder, K Hugdahl, R J Dolan
BACKGROUND: Disturbances in Pavlovian valuation systems are reported to follow traumatic stress exposure. However, motivated decisions are also guided by instrumental mechanisms, but to date the effect of traumatic stress on these instrumental systems remain poorly investigated. Here, we examine whether a single episode of severe traumatic stress influences flexible instrumental decisions through an impact on a Pavlovian system. METHODS: Twenty-six survivors of the 2011 Norwegian terror attack and 30 matched control subjects performed an instrumental learning task in which Pavlovian and instrumental associations promoted congruent or conflicting responses...
June 23, 2017: Psychological Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28640035/the-professionalism-and-integrity-in-research-program-description-and-preliminary-outcomes
#14
James M DuBois, John T Chibnall, Raymond Tait, Jillon S Vander Wal
Violations of rules and regulations in research can cause significant problems for human participants, animal subjects, data integrity, institutions, and investigators. The Professionalism and Integrity in Research Program (PI Program) provides remediation training that addresses the root causes of violations of rules and regulations in research. Through assessments, a three-day workshop, and follow-up coaching calls, the PI Program teaches evidence-based decision-making strategies designed to help researchers to compensate for bias, uncertainty, and work-related stress, and foster the skills needed to oversee research projects in today's complex regulatory environments...
June 20, 2017: Academic Medicine: Journal of the Association of American Medical Colleges
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28603756/cognitive-mechanisms-and-therapeutic-targets-of-addiction
#15
Marc L Copersino
Fundamental to cognitive models of addiction is the gradual strengthening of automatic, urge-related responding that develops in tandem with the diminution of self-control-related processes aimed at inhibiting impulses. Recent conceptualizations of addiction also include a third set of cognitive processes related to self-awareness and superordinate regulation of self-control and other higher brain function. This review describes new human research evidence and theoretical developments related to the multicausal strengthening of urge-related responding and failure of self-control in addiction, and the etiology of disrupted self-awareness and rational decision-making associated with continued substance use...
February 2017: Current Opinion in Behavioral Sciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28600924/-only-you-can-play-with-me-children-s-inclusive-decision-making-reasoning-and-emotions-based-on-peers-gender-and-behavior-problems
#16
Joanna Peplak, Ju-Hyun Song, Tyler Colasante, Tina Malti
This study examined the development of children's decisions, reasoning, and emotions in contexts of peer inclusion/exclusion. We asked an ethnically diverse sample of 117 children aged 4years (n=59; 60% girls) and 8years (n=58; 49% girls) to choose between including hypothetical peers of the same or opposite gender and with or without attention deficit/hyperactivity problems and aggressive behavior. Children also provided justifications for, and emotions associated with, their inclusion decisions. Both 4- and 8-year-olds predominantly chose to include the in-group peer (i...
June 7, 2017: Journal of Experimental Child Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28587695/hyper-responsivity-to-losses-in-the-anterior-insula-during-economic-choice-scales-with-depression-severity
#17
J B Engelmann, G S Berns, B W Dunlop
BACKGROUND: Commonly observed distortions in decision-making among patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) may emerge from impaired reward processing and cognitive biases toward negative events. There is substantial theoretical support for the hypothesis that MDD patients overweight potential losses compared with gains, though the neurobiological underpinnings of this bias are uncertain. METHODS: Twenty-one unmedicated patients with MDD were compared with 25 healthy controls (HC) using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) together with an economic decision-making task over mixed lotteries involving probabilistic gains and losses...
June 7, 2017: Psychological Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28572846/legal-and-psychological-considerations-for-obtaining-informed-consent-for-reverse-total-shoulder-arthroplasty
#18
REVIEW
Craig Blackwood, Jen Dixon, Peter Reilly, Roger J Emery
This paper seeks to outline recent legal developments and requirements pertinent to obtaining informed consent. We argue that this is of particular relevance to patients considering a reverse total shoulder arthroplasty, due to the high complication rate associated with this procedure. By examining the cognitive processes involved in decision-making, and other clinician-related factors such as delivery of information, gender bias and conflict of interest, we explore some of the barriers that can undermine the processes of shared decision-making and obtaining genuine informed consent...
January 2017: Shoulder & Elbow
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28546312/prefrontal-dopamine-d1-and-d2-receptors-regulate-dissociable-aspects-of-decision-making-via-distinct-ventral-striatal-and-amygdalar-circuits
#19
Nicole L Jenni, Joshua D Larkin, Stan B Floresco
Mesocortical dopamine (DA) regulates a variety of cognitive functions via actions on D1 and/or D2 receptors. For example, risk/reward decision making is differentially modulated by these two receptors within the prefrontal cortex (PFC), with D2 receptors enabling flexible decision making and D1 receptors promoting persistence in choice biases. Yet, it is unclear how DA mediates opposing patterns of behavior by acting on different receptors within the same terminal region. We explored the possibility that DA may act on separate networks of PFC neurons that are modulated by D1 or D2 receptors and in turn interface with divergent downstream structures, such as the basolateral amygdala (BLA) or nucleus accumbens (NAc)...
May 25, 2017: Journal of Neuroscience: the Official Journal of the Society for Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28536918/-cognitive-errors-in-diagnostic-decision-making
#20
REVIEW
Martin Gäbler
Approximately 10-15% of our diagnostic decisions are faulty and may lead to unfavorable and dangerous outcomes, which could be avoided. These diagnostic errors are mainly caused by cognitive biases in the diagnostic reasoning process.Our medical diagnostic decision-making is based on intuitive "System 1" and analytical "System 2" diagnostic decision-making and can be deviated by unconscious cognitive biases.These deviations can be positively influenced on a systemic and an individual level. For the individual, metacognition (internal withdrawal from the decision-making process) and debiasing strategies, such as verification, falsification and rule out worst-case scenarios, can lead to improved diagnostic decisions making...
May 23, 2017: Wiener Medizinische Wochenschrift
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