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Blunt head trauma

Janis L Vahldiek, Stefan Thieme, Bernd Hamm, Stefan M Niehues
BACKGROUND: The use of computed tomography (CT) scans of the head and cervical spine has markedly increased in patients with blunt minor trauma. The actual likelihood of a combined injury of head and cervical spine following a minor trauma is estimated to be low. PURPOSE: To determine the incidence of such combined injuries in patients with a blunt minor trauma in order to estimate the need to derive improved diagnostic guidelines. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A total of 1854 patients were retrospectively analyzed...
October 17, 2016: Acta Radiologica
Ashley Blanchard, Keven I Cabrera, Nathan Kuppermann, Peter S Dayan
OBJECTIVES: We aimed to determine the prevalence of and adverse outcomes caused by pneumocephali in children with minor blunt head trauma who had no other intracranial injuries (ie, isolated pneumocephali). METHODS: We conducted a secondary analysis of a public use dataset from a multicenter prospective study of pediatric minor head trauma. We included children younger than 18 years with Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) scores of 14 or 15 and non-trivial mechanisms of injury who had cranial computed tomographies obtained...
October 6, 2016: Pediatric Emergency Care
I M Villarreal, D Méndez, J M Duque Silva, P Ortega Del Álamo
Introduction. Labyrinthine concussion is a term used to describe a rare cause of sensorineural hearing loss with or without vestibular symptoms occurring after head trauma. Isolated damage to the inner ear without involving the vestibular organ would be designated as a cochlear labyrinthine concussion. Hearing loss is not a rare finding in head trauma that involves petrous bone fractures. Nevertheless it generally occurs ipsilateral to the side of the head injury and extraordinarily in the contralateral side and moreover without the presence of a fracture...
2016: Case Reports in Otolaryngology
Roger W Byard, Matthew Cox, Peter Stockham
The body of a 19-year-old male was found apparently concealed underneath bushes with recent head and facial trauma, and multiple superficial abrasions. Subsequently, it was discovered that the decedent had been running into objects and buildings following the ingestion the evening before of what was thought to be lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD). Blood staining of a nearby wall close to where the body was lying was in keeping with the described behavior. Toxicology revealed 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (Ecstasy), in addition to two only recently available drugs 2-(4-bromo-2,5-dimethoxyphenyl)-N-[(2-methoxyphenyl)methyl]ethanamine, (25B-NBOMe), and 1-(3,4-methylenedioxyphenyl)-2-(1-pyrrolidinyl)-1-butanone, (MDPBP)...
October 10, 2016: Journal of Forensic Sciences
Melvin E Stone, Stanley Kalata, Anna Liveris, Zachary Adorno, Shira Yellin, Edward Chao, Srinivas H Reddy, Michael Jones, Carlos Vargas, Sheldon Teperman
BACKGROUND: Critical administration threshold (≥3 units of packed red blood cells/h or CAT+) has been proposed as a new definition for massive transfusion (MT) that includes volume and rate of blood transfusion. CAT+ has been shown to eliminate survivor bias and be a better predictor of mortality than the traditional MT (>10 units/24h). End-tidal CO2 (ET CO2) negatively correlates with lactate and is an early predictor of shock in trauma patients. We conducted a pilot study to test the hypothesis that low ET CO2 on admission predicts CAT+...
July 5, 2016: Injury
Daniel W Spaite, Chengcheng Hu, Bentley J Bobrow, Vatsal Chikani, Bruce Barnhart, Joshua B Gaither, Kurt R Denninghoff, P David Adelson, Samuel M Keim, Chad Viscusi, Terry Mullins, Duane Sherrill
STUDY OBJECTIVE: Survival is significantly reduced by either hypotension or hypoxia during the out-of-hospital management of major traumatic brain injury. However, only a handful of small studies have investigated the influence of the combination of both hypotension and hypoxia occurring together. In patients with major traumatic brain injury, we evaluate the associations between mortality and out-of-hospital hypotension and hypoxia separately and in combination. METHODS: All moderate or severe traumatic brain injury cases in the preimplementation cohort of the Excellence in Prehospital Injury Care study (a statewide, before/after, controlled study of the effect of implementing the out-of-hospital traumatic brain injury treatment guidelines) from January 1, 2007, to March 31, 2014, were evaluated (exclusions: <10 years, out-of-hospital oxygen saturation ≤10%, and out-of-hospital systolic blood pressure <40 or >200 mm Hg)...
September 27, 2016: Annals of Emergency Medicine
Mehmet Kurt, Kaveh Laksari, Calvin Kuo, Gerald A Grant, David B Camarillo
Bicycling is the leading cause of sports-related traumatic brain injury. Most of the current bike helmets are made of expanded polystyrene (EPS) foam and ultimately designed to prevent blunt trauma, e.g., skull fracture. However, these helmets have limited effectiveness in preventing brain injuries. With the availability of high-rate micro-electrical-mechanical systems sensors and high energy density batteries, a new class of helmets, i.e., expandable helmets, can sense an impending collision and expand to protect the head...
September 27, 2016: Annals of Biomedical Engineering
Robert Zant, Michael Melter, Christian Doerfler, Felix Schlachetzki, Ernst-Michael Jung, Stefan Schilling, Juergen Kunkel
Internal carotid artery (ICA) dissections with associated stroke are rare events in infants. The usual pathomechanisms include direct trauma to the artery, blunt intraoral trauma, or child abuse. We describe the case of a 4-month-old male patient with ICA dissection and associated middle cerebral artery territory infarction associated with hyperextension/hyperrotation after a minor head injury. Upon treatment with anticoagulants, the patient showed significant improvement of the left-sided hemiparesis. Hemorrhagic transformation that presented shortly after middle cerebral artery infarction did not further increase under heparin treatment and prevented further embolism...
September 23, 2016: Pediatric Emergency Care
William L Wang, Aaron V Mares
Bilateral epidural hematoma is a rare complication of blunt head trauma. We present an unusual case of a division I collegiate football athlete who suffered a bilateral epidural hematoma with parietal skull fracture after falling down a flight of stairs. In our case, we highlight the initial presentation to rehabilitation up until eventual return-to-play 4 months later.
August 24, 2016: Journal of Sport Rehabilitation
Rachel M Stanley, Michael D Johnson, Cheryl Vance, Lalit Bajaj, Lynn Babcock, Shireen Atabaki, Danny Thomas, Harold K Simon, Daniel M Cohen, Daniel Rubacalva, P David Adelson, Blake Bulloch, Alexander J Rogers, Prashant Mahajan, Jill Baren, Lois Lee, John Hoyle, Kimberly Quayle, T Charles Casper, J Michael Dean, Nathan Kuppermann
OBJECTIVES: In preparation for a clinical trial of therapeutic agents for children with moderate-to-severe blunt traumatic brain injuries (TBIs) in emergency departments (EDs), we conducted this feasibility study to 1) determine the number and clinical characteristics of eligible children, 2) determine the timing of patient and guardian arrival to the ED, and 3) describe the heterogeneity of TBIs on computed tomography (CT) scans. METHODS: We conducted a prospective observational study at 16 EDs of children ≤ 18 years of age presenting with blunt head trauma and Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) scores of 3-12...
September 12, 2016: Academic Emergency Medicine: Official Journal of the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine
James M Feeney, Elizabeth Santone, Monica DiFiori, Lilla Kis, Vijay Jayaraman, Stephanie C Montgomery
BACKGROUND: Falls represent the leading cause of traumatic brain injury in adults older than 65, with nearly one third experiencing a fall each year. Evidence suggests that up to 0.5% of anticoagulated patients suffer from intracranial hemorrhage (ICH) annually. Direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) have become an increasingly popular alternative to warfarin for anticoagulation; however, there is a dearth of research regarding the safety of DOACs, in particular on the outcome of traumatic ICH while taking DOACs...
November 2016: Journal of Trauma and Acute Care Surgery
Hari Shanker Sharma, Dafin F Muresanu, José V Lafuente, Ala Nozari, Ranjana Patnaik, Stephen D Skaper, Aruna Sharma
The blood-brain barrier (BBB) plays a pivotal role in the maintenance of the central nervous system (CNS) function in health and disease. Thus, in almost all neurodegenerative, traumatic or metabolic insults the BBB breakdown occurs to large molecules e.g., serum proteins. Entry of serum proteins into the brain fluid microenvironment leads to edema formation and subsequently cellular injuries. Accordingly, restoration of the BBB function using drugs will lead to neurorepair. However, injury to the brain occurring following blast, bullet wounds, or knife injury appears to initiate different set of pathophysiological responses...
September 2, 2016: CNS & Neurological Disorders Drug Targets
James M Feeney, Matthew Neulander, Monica DiFiori, Lilla Kis, David S Shapiro, Vijay Jayaraman, William T Marshall, Stephanie C Montgomery
METHODS: We queried our Trauma Quality Improvement Program registry for patients who presented between 6/1/2011 and 9/1/2015 with severe (injury severity score (ISS)>15) blunt traumatic injury during anticoagulant use. Patients were then grouped into those prescribed warfarin and patients prescribed any of the available novel Direct Oral Anticoagulants (DOAC) medications. We excluded severe (AIS≧4) head injuries. RESULTS: There were no differences between DOAC and warfarin groups in terms of age, gender mean ISS, median hospital or intensive care unit lengths of stay, complication proportions, numbers of complications per patient, or the proportion of patients requiring transfusion...
August 27, 2016: Injury
Brian R Englum, Brian C Gulack, Henry E Rice, John E Scarborough, Obinna O Adibe
PURPOSE: This study aims to examine the current management strategies and outcomes after blunt pancreatic trauma in children using a national patient registry. METHODS: Using the National Trauma Data Bank (NTDB) from 2007-2011, we identified all patients ≤18years old who suffered blunt pancreatic trauma. Patients were categorized as undergoing nonoperative pancreatic management (no abdominal operation, abdominal operation without pancreatic-specific procedure, or pancreatic drainage alone) or operative pancreatic management (pancreatic resection/repair)...
September 2016: Journal of Pediatric Surgery
Tobias Haltmeier, Elizabeth Benjamin, Stefano Siboni, Evren Dilektasli, Kenji Inaba, Demetrios Demetriades
PURPOSE: Prehospital endotracheal intubation (ETI) for traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a controversial issue. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of prehospital ETI in patients with TBI. METHODS: Cohort-matched study using the US National Trauma Data Bank (NTDB) 2008-2012. Patients with isolated severe blunt TBI (AIS head ≥3, AIS chest/abdomen <3) and a field GCS ≤8 were extracted from NTDB. A 1:1 matching of patients with and without prehospital ETI was performed...
August 27, 2016: European Journal of Trauma and Emergency Surgery: Official Publication of the European Trauma Society
Kohei Tsukahara, Keiji Sato, Tetsuya Yumoto, Atsuyoshi Iida, Nobuyuki Nosaka, Michihisa Terado, Hiromichi Naito, Yorihisa Orita, Tomoyuki Naito, Kentaro Miki, Mayu Sugihara, Satoko Nagao, Toyomu Ugawa, Atsunori Nakao
INTRODUCTION: Massive bleeding from the thyroid gland causing airway compromise secondary to indirect neck trauma is rare. PRESENTATION OF CASE: An 89-year-old woman was transferred to our emergency department due to anterior neck pain after a traffic accident. She had been propelled forward and struck her head on the front mirror during emergency braking. Airway patency was confirmed at the first contact. Although her vital signs were stable at presentation, she gradually suffered from respiratory distress and severe dyspnea, implying airway compression, therefore requiring endotracheal intubation...
2016: International Journal of Surgery Case Reports
Brandon Scott, Brandon Taylor, Joseph R Shung, Prasit Nimityongskul
: Femoral neck and pelvic fractures are rarely encountered in the pediatric population secondary to the resilient nature of the immature skeleton. Both fracture types usually result from high-energy blunt trauma including motor vehicle collisions, motor vehicle-pedestrian accidents, and falls from height. Considerable studies have been published on the natural history, management, and complications of pediatric pelvis and femoral neck fractures. However, few case reports have documented both fracture types in the same patient...
August 4, 2016: Journal of Pediatric Orthopedics. Part B
Yoshihiro Katsuura, James Michael Osborn, Garrick Wayne Cason
PURPOSE: To describe the epidemiology of thoracolumbar fractures and associated injuries in blunt trauma patients. METHODS: A systematic review and metaanalysis was performed based on a MEDLINE database search using MeSH terms for studies matching our inclusion criteria. The search yielded 21 full-length articles, each sub-grouped according to content. Data extraction and multiple analyses were performed on descriptive data. RESULTS: The rate of thoracolumbar fracture in blunt trauma patients was 6...
December 2016: Journal of Orthopaedics
Sigrid Narum, Odd Brørs, Olav Stokland, Marianne K Kringen
BACKGROUND: Bleeding represents the most well-known and the most feared complications caused by the use of antithrombotic agents. There is, however, limited documentation whether pre-injury use of antithrombotic agents affects outcome after head trauma. The aim of this study was to define the relationship between the use of preinjury antithrombotic agents and mortality among elderly people sustaining blunt head trauma. METHODS: A retrospective cohort analysis was performed on the hospital based trauma registry at Oslo University Hospital...
2016: BMC Emergency Medicine
Michael G Tunik, Elizabeth C Powell, Prashant Mahajan, Jeff E Schunk, Elizabeth Jacobs, Michelle Miskin, Sally Jo Zuspan, Sandra Wootton-Gorges, Shireen M Atabaki, John D Hoyle, James F Holmes, Peter S Dayan, Nathan Kuppermann
STUDY OBJECTIVE: We describe presentations and outcomes of children with basilar skull fractures in the emergency department (ED) after blunt head trauma. METHODS: This was a secondary analysis of an observational cohort of children with blunt head trauma. Basilar skull fracture was defined as physical examination signs of basilar skull fracture without basilar skull fracture on computed tomography (CT), or basilar skull fracture on CT regardless of physical examination signs of basilar skull fracture...
October 2016: Annals of Emergency Medicine
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