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Social and cultural perspectives in health

Jonathan Delman, Vanessa V Klodnick
Peer providers are a promising practice for transition-age youth community mental health treatment engagement and support, yet little is known about the experience of being a young adult peer provider or what helps to make an individual in this role successful. Utilizing a capital theory lens, this study uses data from focus groups (two with young adult peer providers and two with their supervisors) to examine facilitators of young adult peer provider success in community mental health treatment settings. Eight factors were identified as critical to young adult peer provider on-the-job success: persistence, job confidence, resilience, job training, skilled communications with colleagues, regular and individualized supervision, support from colleagues, and family support...
October 22, 2016: Community Mental Health Journal
Alex Hall, Tracy Finch, Niina Kolehmainen, Deborah James
BACKGROUND: Implementing good-quality health and social care requires empowerment of staff members within organizations delivering care. Video Interaction Guidance (VIG) is an intervention using positive video feedback to empower staff through reflection on practice. This qualitative study explored the implementation of VIG within an autism care organization in England, from the perspective of staff members undergoing training to deliver VIG. METHODS: Semi-structured interviews were conducted with a purposive sample of 7 participants working within the organization (5 staff undergoing training to deliver VIG; 2 senior managers influencing co-ordination of training)...
October 21, 2016: BMC Health Services Research
Naomi Priest, Laura Thompson, Tamara Mackean, Alison Baker, Elizabeth Waters
OBJECTIVE: Australian Indigenous children experience some of the most substantial health inequalities globally. In this context, research regarding their health and well-being has overemphasised physical illnesses with limited exploration of a diverse range of dimensions and determinants, particularly those based on Indigenous holistic understandings of health and well-being. This deficit-based approach has thus missed many strengths and assets of Indigenous children. This research aimed to gain insight into the perspectives of Indigenous children about their health and well-being in an urban setting in Australia...
October 21, 2016: Ethnicity & Health
Andrew Paul Gray, Faisca Richer, Sam Harper
OBJECTIVES: Following the onset of intensive colonial intervention and rapid social change in the lives of Inuit people, youth in Nunavik have experienced high rates of mental health problems and suicide. Inuit people describe a broad range of contextual influences on mental wellness based on lived experience, but most epidemiological studies have focused on individual risk factors and pathologies. This study aimed to assess the influence of multiple determinants of mental wellness among Inuit youth in Nunavik, including culturally meaningful activities, housing and community social characteristics...
October 20, 2016: Canadian Journal of Public Health. Revue Canadienne de Santé Publique
Qingyan Ma, Lai Sze Tso, Zachary C Rich, Brian J Hall, Rachel Beanland, Haochu Li, Mellanye Lackey, Fengyu Hu, Weiping Cai, Meg Doherty, Joseph D Tucker
INTRODUCTION: Qualitative research on antiretroviral therapy (ART) adherence interventions can provide a deeper understanding of intervention facilitators and barriers. This systematic review aims to synthesize qualitative evidence of interventions for improving ART adherence and to inform patient-centred policymaking. METHODS: We searched 19 databases to identify studies presenting primary qualitative data on the experiences, attitudes and acceptability of interventions to improve ART adherence among PLHIV and treatment providers...
2016: Journal of the International AIDS Society
Deborah Q Shelef, Cynthia Rand, Randi Streisand, Ivor B Horn, Kabir Yadav, Lisa Stewart, Naja Foushee, Damian Waters, Stephen J Teach
BACKGROUND: Stakeholder engagement has the potential to develop research interventions which are responsive to patient and provider preferences. This approach contrasts with traditional models of clinical research, in which researchers determine the study's design. OBJECTIVE: This article describes the impact of stakeholder engagement on the design of a randomized trial of an intervention designed to improve child asthma outcomes by reducing parental stress. METHODS: The study team developed and implemented a stakeholder engagement process that provided iterative feedback regarding the study design, patient-centered outcomes, and intervention...
October 12, 2016: Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology
Christine H Oedegaard, Lesley Berk, Michael Berk, Eric A Youngstrom, Steven C Dilsaver, Robert H Belmaker, Ketil J Oedegaard, Ole B Fasmer, Ingunn M Engebretsen
OBJECTIVE: Clinical management of bipolar disorder patients might be affected by culture and is further dependent on the context of healthcare delivery. There is a need to understand how healthcare best can be delivered in various systems and cultures. The objective of this qualitative study was to gain knowledge about culture-specific values, beliefs and practices in the medical care provided to patients with bipolar disorders from a provider perspective in various areas of the world...
October 14, 2016: Australian and New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry
J Dunn, G Garvey, P C Valery, D Ball, K M Fong, S Vinod, D L O'Connell, S K Chambers
PURPOSE: Globally, lung cancer is the most common cancer and the leading cause of cancer death. Problematically, there is a wide variation in the management and survival for people with lung cancer and there is limited understanding of the reasons for these variations. To date, the views of health professionals across relevant disciplines who deliver such care are largely absent. The present study describes Australian health professionals' views about barriers to lung cancer care to help build a research and action agenda for improving lung cancer outcomes...
October 10, 2016: Supportive Care in Cancer: Official Journal of the Multinational Association of Supportive Care in Cancer
Bonnie B McConnell
Drawing on ethnographic research with kanyeleng fertility society performers and health workers in The Gambia (2012-2013), this paper uses a social capital approach to analyze the relationship between musical performance and health communication. Health communication research has demonstrated the important role of social capital in mediating the impact of interventions. Music research has drawn attention to performance as a site in which social relationships and obligations are produced and negotiated. In this paper, I bring these two perspectives together in order to open up new ways of thinking about musical performance as a culturally appropriate strategy in health communication...
September 19, 2016: Social Science & Medicine
Tabassum Firoz, Marianne Vidler, Prestige Tatenda Makanga, Helena Boene, Rogério Chiaú, Esperança Sevene, Laura A Magee, Peter von Dadelszen, Khátia Munguambe
BACKGROUND: Mozambique has one of the highest rates of maternal mortality in sub-Saharan Africa. The main influences on maternal health encompass social, economic, political, environmental and cultural determinants of health. To effectively address maternal mortality in the post-2015 agenda, interventions need to consider the determinants of health so that their delivery is not limited to the health sector. The objective of this exploratory qualitative study was to identify key community groups' perspectives on the perceived determinants of maternal health in rural areas of southern Mozambique...
September 30, 2016: Reproductive Health
Marije Oostindjer, Jessica Aschemann-Witzel, Qing Wang, Silje Elisabeth Skuland, Bjørg Egelandsdal, Gro V Amdam, Alexander Schjøll, Mark C Pachucki, Paul Rozin, Jarrett Stein, Valerie Lengard Almli, Ellen van Kleef
There is little agreement among governments, institutions, scientists and food activists as to how to best tackle the challenging issues of health and sustainability in the food sector. This essay discusses the potential of school meals as a platform to promote healthy and sustainable food behavior. School meal programs are of particular interest for improving public diet because they reach children at a population scale across socio-economic classes and for over a decade of their lives, and because food habits of children are more malleable than those of adults...
August 10, 2016: Critical Reviews in Food Science and Nutrition
Lotte Elton
Purpose This paper aims to describe and analyse some of the ways in which good leadership can enable those working within the National Health Service (NHS) to weather the changes and difficulties likely to arise in the coming years, and takes the format of an essay written by the prize-winner of the Faculty of Medical Leadership and Management's Student Prize. The Faculty of Medical Leadership and Management ran its inaugural Student Prize in 2015-2016, which aimed at medical students with an interest in medical leadership...
October 3, 2016: Leadership in Health Services
Simona Hvalič-Touzery, Hanna Hopia, Sanna Sihvonen, Sadhna Diwan, Soma Sen, Brigita Skela-Savič
BACKGROUND: Internationalization of practical training in health and social care study programs is an important aspect of higher education. However, field mentors' and classroom teachers' competence in guiding culturally diverse students varies widely in European countries, and the majority does not have enough training in guiding foreign students. OBJECTIVES: This study aimed to examine which factors enhance the efficacy of international practical placement experiences in health and social care study programs...
September 28, 2016: Nurse Education Today
Adam Fusheini
BACKGROUND: National/social health insurance schemes have increasingly been seen in many low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) as a vehicle to universal health coverage (UHC) and a viable alternative funding mechanism for the health sector. Several countries, including Ghana, have thus introduced and implemented mandatory national health insurance schemes (NHIS) as part of reform efforts towards increasing access to health services. Ghana passed mandatory national health insurance (NHI) legislation (ACT 650) in 2003 and commenced nationwide implementation in 2004...
April 27, 2016: International Journal of Health Policy and Management
Alice Travers, Vanessa Taylor
INTRODUCTION: Improving end of life care is a national imperative. Unsatisfactory care persists particularly in acute hospitals, with shortcomings, variability in communication and advance care planning identified as fundamental issues. This review explored the literature to identify what is known about the barriers to initiating end-of-life conversations with patients from the perspective of doctors and nurses in the acute hospital setting. METHOD: Six electronic databases were searched for potentially relevant records published between 2008 and 2015...
September 2, 2016: International Journal of Palliative Nursing
Stefanie Puszka, Kylie M Dingwall, Michelle Sweet, Tricia Nagel
BACKGROUND: Electronic mental health (e-mental health) interventions offer effective, easily accessible, and cost effective treatment and support for mental illness and well-being concerns. However, e-mental health approaches have not been well utilized by health services to date and little is known about their implementation in practice, particularly in diverse contexts and communities. OBJECTIVE: This study aims to understand stakeholder perspectives on the requirements for implementing e-mental health approaches in regional and remote health services for Indigenous Australians...
2016: JMIR Mental Health
Ali Lakhani, Donna McDonald, Heidi Zeeman
Self-directed disability support policies aim to encourage greater choice and control for service users in terms of the health and social care they receive. The proliferation of self-directed disability support policies throughout the developed world has resulted in a growing amount of research exploring the outcomes for service users, and their families and carers. Our understanding of the issues faced by people with disabilities, particularly how they make health and social care decisions and the key areas that determine their engagement with service providers within a self-directed environment is limited...
September 19, 2016: Health & Social Care in the Community
Suzanne Rainsford, Roderick D MacLeod, Nicholas J Glasgow, Donna M Wilson, Christine B Phillips, Robert B Wiles
The 'good death' is one objective of palliative care, with many 'good death' viewpoints and research findings reflecting the urban voice. Rural areas are distinct and need special consideration. This scoping review identified and charted current research knowledge on the 'good' rural death through the perspectives of rural residents, including rural patients with a life-limiting illness, to identify evidence and gaps in the literature for future studies. A comprehensive literature search of English language articles (no date filter applied) was conducted in 2016 (2 January to 14 February) using five library databases...
September 19, 2016: Health & Social Care in the Community
Maayan Agmon, Amalia Sa'ar, Tal Araten-Bergman
BACKGROUND: Persons with disabilities (PWD) are one of the most marginalized groups in Western societies. These inequalities are manifested through various disadvantages in the psychosocial, cultural, and economic domains. Inspired by the World Health Organization's holistic conceptualization of disability, the present study examines the relation between the body and personhood in Israeli culture, through cases of newly diagnosed adults with disability. METHOD: Participant observation at a rehabilitation daycare center was carried out for a period of two years...
2016: International Journal for Equity in Health
Michelle Johnson-Motoyama, Mindi Moses, Tiffany Koloroutis Kann, E Susana Mariscal, Michelle Levy, Carolina Navarro, Paula J Fite
Teen pregnancy remains a public health concern particularly among Latinos, whose pregnancy rate of 83.5 per 1000 girls constitutes one of the highest rates of teen pregnancy among all ethnic and racial groups in the United States. To enhance the effectiveness of interventions for diverse Latino populations in the US, it is crucial to assess the community's understanding of the etiology of the problem of adolescent pregnancy and to implement programs that reflect the local community's beliefs and preferences...
September 15, 2016: Journal of Primary Prevention
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