Read by QxMD icon Read

Pregnancy depression

Nedeljka Ivković, Maja Racic, Radoslavka Lecic, Djordje Bozovic, Milan Kulic
AIMS: To evaluate whether serum estrogen level is associated with chronic pain, masticatory dysfunction, and depressive symptoms and/or somatization in women with temporomandibular disorders (TMD) and different menstrual cycle status. METHODS: A total of 64 women were allocated into one of three groups: one composed of women with normal menstrual cycles (Group 1), one composed of pregnant women (Group 2), and one composed of women in surgical menopause (Group 3)...
March 21, 2018: Journal of Oral & Facial Pain and Headache
Eszter Bogi, Kristina Belovicová, Eduard Ujhazy, Mojmír Mach, Romana Koprdova, Ludmila Zilava, Alexandra Garafová, Daniela Jezova, Michal Dubovicky
Depression during pregnancy and in the post-partum period is a growing health issue. Venlafaxine, a representative of serotonin and noradrenaline reuptake inhibitors, is used to treat a wide spectrum of mood disorders. However, the limited number of prenatal and perinatal studies raises the question about the long-term consequences of venlafaxine therapy. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of venlafaxine exposure during pregnancy and lactation on anxiety-like and depression-like behaviors, as well as adrenocortical hormone concentrations in the adult rat offspring...
March 20, 2018: Behavioural Pharmacology
Shari I Lusskin, Sabrina J Khan, Carrie Ernst, Sally Habib, Madeleine E Fersh, Elizabeth S Albertini
Perinatal depression is associated with serious risks for the mother, baby, and family. When considering treating perinatal depression with a drug indicated for the treatment of depression, the major concerns are whether the drug increases the risks of teratogenicity, pregnancy complications, poor neonatal adaptation, or neurodevelopmental disorders. Although different studies have produced different results, the majority have not shown increases in risk for selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, serotonin norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors, tricyclic antidepressants, or the noradrenergic/dopaminergic drug bupropion...
March 20, 2018: Clinical Obstetrics and Gynecology
Farzaneh Zaheri, Lila Hashemi Nasab, Fariba Ranaei, Roonak Shahoei
Background and aim: Postpartum period is associated with significant changes in the quality of women's lives. These changes can affect the health of both the mother and child. Given the importance of the postpartum period and the factors influencing quality of life after childbirth especially the method of childbirth, the aim of this study was to determine the relationship between quality of life after childbirth and the childbirth method in nulliparous women referred to healthcare centers in Sanandaj, Iran...
December 2017: Electronic Physician
Laura Pogliani, Sara Baldelli, Dario Cattaneo, Paola Pileri, Emilio Clementi, Irene Cetin, M D Gianvincenzo Zuccotti
OBJECTIVE: Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors are commonly used for the treatment of pregnancy-related and postnatal depression. However, only a few studies have evaluated the passage of these drugs into human milk, often with conflicting results. Here, we sought to evaluate the passage of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors into human milk in the first days after delivery and their potential association with neonatal outcomes. STUDY DESIGN: The passage of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors into human milk was expressed both as percentage of milk-to-plasma ratio of drug concentrations and as the relative infant dose...
March 20, 2018: Journal of Maternal-fetal & Neonatal Medicine
Omotayo Bernard, Roger C Gibson, Affette McCaw-Binns, Jody Reece, Charlene Coore-Desai, Sydonnie Shakespeare-Pellington, Maureen Samms-Vaughan
BACKGROUND: Antenatal depression is associated with adverse maternal and infant well-being. However, compared to postpartum depression, it has been less frequently explored globally or in Jamaica. This study aimed to determine the prevalence of, and factors associated with, antenatal depressive symptoms among Jamaican women in order to inform policy and build interventions that could improve their management and reduce their negative consequences. METHODS: This secondary analysis of data from the second Jamaican Birth Cohort Study (JA-Kids Birth Cohort) included 3,517 women enrolled during pregnancy...
2018: PloS One
Safwat Y Diab, Sanna Isosävi, Samir R Qouta, Saija Kuittinen, Raija-Leena Punamäki
BACKGROUND: Women at pre partum and post partum are especially susceptible to war trauma because they struggle to protect their infants from danger. Trauma research suggests increased problems in maternal mental health and infant development. Yet many cognitive-emotional processes affect the trauma survivors' mental health, such as post-traumatic growth and post-traumatic cognition. The aim of this study was to examine whether a mother's high post-traumatic growth and optimal post-traumatic cognition could protect their own mental health and their infant's stress regulation from the effects of traumatic war experiences...
February 21, 2018: Lancet
I Hyun Ruisch, Jan K Buitelaar, Jeffrey C Glennon, Pieter J Hoekstra, Andrea Dietrich
BACKGROUND: Pregnancy factors have been implicated in offspring oppositional-defiant disorder (ODD) and conduct disorder (CD) symptoms. Literature still holds notable limitations, such as studying only a restricted set of pregnancy factors, use of screening questionnaires which assess broadly defined outcome measures, and lack of control for disruptive behavior comorbidity and genetic confounds. We aimed to address these gaps by prospectively studying a broad range of pregnancy factors in relation to both offspring ODD and CD symptomatology in the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parent and Children...
February 23, 2018: Journal of Psychiatric Research
Misbah Salim, Verinder Sharma, Kelly K Anderson
We conducted a systematic review of the literature to determine the prevalence of mood episode recurrences during pregnancy among women with bipolar disorder. Included studies (n = 11) had wide variation in the reported proportions of pregnant women with bipolar disorder who experienced a recurrence (median = 24%, range = 4-73%). There is some evidence that pregnant women are more likely to have a depressive or mixed episode, rather than hypomanic or manic. The extant literature cannot answer the question of how pregnancy affects the course of bipolar disorder; it merely informs us of the effect of medication discontinuation during pregnancy...
March 17, 2018: Archives of Women's Mental Health
Štefica Mikšić, Maja Miškulin, Brankica Juranić, Željko Rakošec, Aleksandar Včev, Dunja Degmečić
BACKGROUND: Pregnant women experience a set of biological and psychological disturbances. The aim of this study was to assess the appearance of depressive symptoms and suicidal thoughts in pregnant women during the third trimester of pregnancy. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: A total of 110 pregnant women were included in the study. All of them filled out an anonymous questionnaire about sociodemographic data, Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS), Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), and Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI)...
March 2018: Psychiatria Danubina
Yong-Jun Xu, Hui Sheng, Tian-Wen Wu, Qing-Yue Bao, You Zheng, Yan-Min Zhang, Yu-Xiang Gong, Jian-Qiang Lu, Zhen-Dong You, Yang Xia, Xin Ni
Pregnant women at risk of preterm labor usually receive synthetic glucocorticoids (sGCs) to promote fetal lung development. Emerging evidence indicates that antenatal sGC increases the risk of affective disorders in offspring. Data from animal studies show that such disorders can be transmitted to the second generation. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the intergenerational effects of prenatal sGC remain largely unknown. Here we show that prenatal dexamethasone (Dex) administration in late pregnancy induced depression-like behavior in first-generation (F1) offspring, which could be transmitted to second-generation (F2) offspring with maternal dependence...
March 15, 2018: FASEB Journal: Official Publication of the Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology
Jennifer Katz, Hugh F Crean, Catherine Cerulli, Ellen L Poleshuck
Introduction Although poverty is an established correlate of poorer mental health for pregnant women, limited research has examined the mental health effects of material hardship (i.e., difficulties meeting basic needs such as for food, transportation, or stable housing) during pregnancy. Methods The current research examined rates of material hardship among pregnant women seeking prenatal care and the relationships of both income and material hardship with depression and anxiety during pregnancy. Pregnant women (N = 892) responded to self-report measures of mental health symptoms, annual household income, and current material hardship in the waiting areas of community-based obstetrics/gynecology practices serving primarily financially disadvantaged patients...
March 14, 2018: Maternal and Child Health Journal
Daisy Oliveira Costa, Fabíola Isabel Suano de Souza, Glaura César Pedroso, Maria Wany Louzada Strufaldi
This study aimed to determine the presence and association of possible mental disorders diagnoses in primary care pregnant women and newborns' conditions. This is a longitudinal study with pregnant women (18-39 years), in the second and third trimesters of pregnancy, attended at primary care facilities in the metropolitan region of São Paulo (February to August/2014). The following tools were used: sociodemographic questionnaire; Mental Disorders in Primary Care Assessment tool; and an interview with information and mother´s perception of the behavior of newborns...
March 2018: Ciência & Saúde Coletiva
Julia F Litzky, Maya A Deyssenroth, Todd M Everson, Barry M Lester, Luca Lambertini, Jia Chen, Carmen J Marsit
BACKGROUND: Depression and/or anxiety during pregnancy have been associated with impaired fetal growth and neurodevelopmental. Because placental imprinted genes play a central role in fetal development and respond to environmental stressors, we hypothesized that imprinted gene expression would be affected by prenatal depression and anxiety. METHODS: Placental gene expression was compared between mothers with prenatal depression and/or anxiety/obsessive compulsive disorder/panic and control mothers without psychiatric history (n=458) in the Rhode Island Child Health Study...
March 14, 2018: Pediatric Research
Nancy Byatt, Lucille Cox, Tiffany A Moore Simas, Nisha Kini, Kathleen Biebel, Padma Sankaran, Holly A Swartz, Linda Weinreb
To elucidate (1) the challenges associated with under-recognition of bipolar disorder in obstetric settings, (2) barriers pregnant and postpartum women with bipolar disorder face when trying to access psychiatric care, and (3) how obstetric settings can identify such women and connect them with mental health services. Structured, in-depth interviews were conducted with 25 pregnant and postpartum women recruited from obstetric practices who scored ≥ 10 on the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale and met DSM-IV criteria for bipolar disorder I, II, or not otherwise specified using the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview...
March 13, 2018: Archives of Women's Mental Health
Sukanya Srinivasan, Lisa Schlar, Stephanie E Rosener, Daniel J Frayne, Scott G Hartman, Michael A Horst, Jessica L Brubach, Stephen Ratcliffe
BACKGROUND: Preterm birth, birth defects, and unintended pregnancy are major sources of infant and maternal morbidity, mortality, and associated resource use in American health care. Interconception Care (ICC) is recommended as a strategy to improve birth outcomes by modifying maternal risks between pregnancies, but no established model currently exists. The Interventions to Minimize Preterm and Low Birth Weight Infants through Continuous Improvement Techniques (IMPLICIT) Network developed and implemented a unique approach to ICC by assessing mothers during their baby's well-child visits (WCVs) up to 24 months...
March 2018: Journal of the American Board of Family Medicine: JABFM
Yoshihiro Miyake, Keiko Tanaka, Hitomi Okubo, Satoshi Sasaki, Masashi Arakawa
OBJECTIVES: The present prebirth cohort study examined the association between maternal caffeine consumption during pregnancy and behavioral problems in Japanese children aged 5 years. METHODS: Subjects were 1199 mother-child pairs. Dietary intake was assessed using a diet history questionnaire. Emotional problems, conduct problems, hyperactivity problems, and peer problems were assessed using the Japanese parent-report version of the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire...
March 13, 2018: Nutritional Neuroscience
Lina Kurdahi Badr
PURPOSE: Although the negative consequences of maternal depression on infants has been documented in several Western societies, similar studies have not been conducted in Middle-Eastern countries where cultural norms and traditions may differ. The main objective of this study was to determine the risk factors for postpartum depression (PPD) and its relationship to mother -infant bonding in a Lebanese population. METHODS: One hundred and fifty participants were administered the Edinburgh Postpartum Depression Scale (EPDS), and the social support scale at 2-3 days postpartum...
March 10, 2018: Infant Behavior & Development
Bozidarka L Zaric, Milan Obradovic, Vladan Bajic, Mohamed A Haidara, Milos Jovanovic, Esma R Isenovic
Homocysteine (Hcy) is thiol group containing the amino acid, which naturally occurs in all humans. Hcy is degraded in the body through two metabolic pathways, while a minor part is excreted through kidneys. The chemical reactions that are necessary for degradation of Hcy require the presence of the folic acid, vitamins B6 and B12. Consequently, the level of the total Hcy in the serum is influenced by the presence or absence of these vitamins. An elevated level of the Hcy, hyperhomocysteinemia (HHcy) and homocystinuria are connected with occlusive artery disease, especially in the brain, the heart, and the kidney, in addition to venous thrombosis, chronic renal failure, megaloblastic anemia, osteoporosis, depression, Alzheimer's disease, pregnancy problems, and others...
March 12, 2018: Current Medicinal Chemistry
Stephen Matthey, Frances Bilbao
BACKGROUND: Routine screening for emotional health difficulties in women during pregnancy is now advocated in several countries. There is a need therefore to compare the performance of different self-report measures to accomplish this. This study reports on the comparative performance of two such measures- the well-established PHQ-2, which aims to detect depression, and the more recent MGMQ, which aims to detect a wide array of negative emotions. METHOD: Women (N = 2292) attending a public hospital antenatal clinic over a 14-month period completed the two measures, either on their own (72%), verbally administered by the midwife (25%), or with an interpreter (3%)...
February 27, 2018: Journal of Affective Disorders
Fetch more papers »
Fetching more papers... Fetching...
Read by QxMD. Sign in or create an account to discover new knowledge that matter to you.
Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"