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Food provisioning

Merel R van Veen, Renate M Winkels, Silvie H M Janssen, Ellen Kampman, Sandra Beijer
We investigated whether obtaining nutritional information influences reported changes in dietary behavior in cancer survivors and their relatives and whether nutritional information needs influence this association. We included 239 cancer survivors and their relatives, recruited from an online panel of cancer survivors and relatives. This panel completed a survey about their experiences with nutritional information provision by healthcare professionals and the media in the period after diagnosis, their information needs regarding nutrition and cancer, and whether they changed their dietary behavior since diagnosis...
March 14, 2018: Nutrition and Cancer
Garyk Brixi
Treatment of acute malnutrition typically requires the provision of ready-to-use food (RUF). Common RUF is effective but expensive, being manufactured from costly ingredients, and shipped worldwide from few global suppliers. I developed a linear programming tool to create RUF optimized for low cost using locally grown crops while maintaining necessary nutritional goals and other constraints. My tool utilizes a database of the nutritional value, price, and water efficiency of suitable ingredients and allows adjustment of constraints, including nutrients, flavour, and crop water efficiency...
March 14, 2018: Maternal & Child Nutrition
Jusun Hwang, Yongbaek Kim, Sang-Won Lee, Na-Yon Kim, Myung-Sun Chun, Hang Lee, Nicole Gottdenker
Direct or indirect supplemental feeding of free-ranging animals occurs worldwide, resulting in significant impacts on population density or altered demographic processes. Another potential impact of increased energy intake from supplemental feeding is altered immunocompetence. As immune system maintenance is energetically costly, there may be trade-offs between immune responses and other energy-demanding physiological processes in individual animals. Although increased availability of food sources through supplemental feeding is expected to increase the overall immunocompetence of animals, empirical data verifying the association between supplemental feeding and different immune parameters are lacking...
March 2018: Ecology and Evolution
Bryony Sands, Neludo Mgidiswa, Casper Nyamukondiwa, Richard Wall
Pyrethroid insecticides are widely used to control ectoparasites of livestock, particularly ticks and biting flies. Their use in African livestock systems is increasing, driven by the need to increase productivity and local food security. However, insecticide residues present in the dung after treatment are toxic to dung-inhabiting insects. In a semiarid agricultural habitat in Botswana, dung beetle adult mortality, brood ball production, and larval survival were compared between untreated cattle dung and cattle dung spiked with deltamethrin, to give concentrations of 0...
March 2018: Ecology and Evolution
Sonia Altizer, Daniel J Becker, Jonathan H Epstein, Kristian M Forbes, Thomas R Gillespie, Richard J Hall, Dana M Hawley, Sonia M Hernandez, Lynn B Martin, Raina K Plowright, Dara A Satterfield, Daniel G Streicker
Human-provided resource subsidies for wildlife are diverse, common and have profound consequences for wildlife-pathogen interactions, as demonstrated by papers in this themed issue spanning empirical, theoretical and management perspectives from a range of study systems. Contributions cut across scales of organization, from the within-host dynamics of immune function, to population-level impacts on parasite transmission, to landscape- and regional-scale patterns of infection. In this concluding paper, we identify common threads and key findings from author contributions, including the consequences of resource subsidies for (i) host immunity; (ii) animal aggregation and contact rates; (iii) host movement and landscape-level infection patterns; and (iv) interspecific contacts and cross-species transmission...
May 5, 2018: Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London. Series B, Biological Sciences
David J Civitello, Brent E Allman, Connor Morozumi, Jason R Rohr
Anthropogenic resource supplementation can shape wildlife disease directly by altering the traits and densities of hosts and parasites or indirectly by stimulating prey, competitor or predator species. We first assess the direct epidemiological consequences of supplementation, highlighting the similarities and differences between food provisioning and two widespread forms of nutrient input: agricultural fertilization and aquatic nutrient enrichment. We then review an aquatic disease system and a general model to assess whether predator and competitor species can enhance or overturn the direct effects of enrichment...
May 5, 2018: Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London. Series B, Biological Sciences
Maureen H Murray, Anjelika D Kidd, Shannon E Curry, Jeffrey Hepinstall-Cymerman, Michael J Yabsley, Henry C Adams, Taylor Ellison, Catharine N Welch, Sonia M Hernandez
Many wildlife species shift their diets to use novel resources in urban areas. The consequences of these shifts are not well known, and consumption of reliable-but low quality-anthropogenic food may present important trade-offs for wildlife health. This may be especially true for carnivorous species such as the American white ibis ( Eudocimus albus ), a nomadic wading bird which has been increasingly observed in urban parks in South Florida, USA. We tested the effects of anthropogenic provisioning on consumer nutrition (i...
May 5, 2018: Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London. Series B, Biological Sciences
Becki Lawson, Robert A Robinson, Mike P Toms, Kate Risely, Susan MacDonald, Andrew A Cunningham
Provision of supplementary food for wild birds at garden feeding stations is a common, large-scale and year-round practice in multiple countries including Great Britain (GB). While these additional dietary resources can benefit wildlife, there is a concomitant risk of disease transmission, particularly when birds repeatedly congregate in the same place at high densities and through interactions of species that would not normally associate in close proximity. Citizen science schemes recording garden birds are popular and can integrate disease surveillance with population monitoring, offering a unique opportunity to explore inter-relationships between supplementary feeding, disease epidemiology and population dynamics...
May 5, 2018: Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London. Series B, Biological Sciences
Sahnzi C Moyers, James S Adelman, Damien R Farine, Courtney A Thomason, Dana M Hawley
Anthropogenic food provisioning of wildlife can alter the frequency of contacts among hosts and between hosts and environmental sources of pathogens. Despite the popularity of garden bird feeding, few studies have addressed how feeders influence host contact rates and disease dynamics. We experimentally manipulated feeder density in replicate aviaries containing captive, pathogen-naive, groups of house finches ( Haemorhous mexicanus ) and continuously tracked behaviours at feeders using radio-frequency identification devices...
May 5, 2018: Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London. Series B, Biological Sciences
Daniel J Becker, Gábor Á Czirják, Dmitriy V Volokhov, Alexandra B Bentz, Jorge E Carrera, Melinda S Camus, Kristen J Navara, Vladimir E Chizhikov, M Brock Fenton, Nancy B Simmons, Sergio E Recuenco, Amy T Gilbert, Sonia Altizer, Daniel G Streicker
Human activities create novel food resources that can alter wildlife-pathogen interactions. If resources amplify or dampen, pathogen transmission probably depends on both host ecology and pathogen biology, but studies that measure responses to provisioning across both scales are rare. We tested these relationships with a 4-year study of 369 common vampire bats across 10 sites in Peru and Belize that differ in the abundance of livestock, an important anthropogenic food source. We quantified innate and adaptive immunity from bats and assessed infection with two common bacteria...
May 5, 2018: Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London. Series B, Biological Sciences
Tomas Strandin, Simon A Babayan, Kristian M Forbes
While urban expansion increasingly encroaches on natural habitats, many wildlife species capitalize on anthropogenic food resources, which have the potential to both positively and negatively influence their responses to infection. Here we examine how food availability and key nutrients have been reported to shape innate and adaptive immunity in wildlife by drawing from field-based studies, as well as captive and food restriction studies with wildlife species. Examples of food provisioning and key nutrients enhancing immune function were seen across the three study type distinctions, as were cases of trace metals and pharmaceuticals impairing the immunity of wildlife species...
May 5, 2018: Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London. Series B, Biological Sciences
Manon K Schweinfurth, Michael Taborsky
Reciprocal cooperation has been observed in a wide range of taxa, but the proximate mechanisms underlying the exchange of help are yet unclear. Norway rats reciprocate help received from partners in an iterated Prisoner's Dilemma game. For donors, this involves accepting own costs to the benefit of a partner, without obtaining immediate benefits in return. We studied whether such altruistic acts are conditional on the communication of the recipient's need. Our results show that in a 2-player mutual food-provisioning task, prospective recipients show a behavioral cascade reflecting increasing intensity...
March 12, 2018: Journal of Comparative Psychology
F H Arthur, M N Ghimire, S W Myers, T W Phillips
The khapra beetle, Trogoderma granarium Everts (Coleoptera: Dermestidae), is a serious pest of stored products and is the only stored product insect pest that triggers a quarantine response when it is found in the United States. The larvae of T. granarium feed on a wide range of dry food products of plant and animal origin, including cereals, dried fish, and museum specimens. In this study, we evaluated the residual efficacy of two pyrethroid insecticides, deltamethrin and cyfluthrin, applied on concrete, wood, painted wood, vinyl flooring tile, and metal surfaces using small and large T...
March 5, 2018: Journal of Economic Entomology
Frank E Muller-Karger, Erin Hestir, Christiana Ade, Kevin Turpie, Dar A Roberts, David Siegel, Robert J Miller, David Humm, Noam Izenberg, Mary Keller, Frank Morgan, Robert Frouin, Arnold G Dekker, Royal Gardner, James Goodman, Blake Schaeffer, Bryan A Franz, Nima Pahlevan, Antonio G Mannino, Javier A Concha, Steven G Ackleson, Kyle C Cavanaugh, Anastasia Romanou, Maria Tzortziou, Emmanuel S Boss, Ryan Pavlick, Anthony Freeman, Cecile S Rousseaux, John Dunne, Matthew C Long, Eduardo Klein, Galen A McKinley, Joachim Goes, Ricardo Letelier, Maria Kavanaugh, Mitchell Roffer, Astrid Bracher, Kevin R Arrigo, Heidi Dierssen, Xiaodong Zhang, Frank W Davis, Ben Best, Robert Guralnick, John Moisan, Heidi M Sosik, Raphael Kudela, Colleen B Mouw, Andrew H Barnard, Sherry Palacios, Collin Roesler, Evangelia G Drakou, Ward Appeltans, Walter Jetz
The biodiversity and high productivity of coastal terrestrial and aquatic habitats are the foundation for important benefits to human societies around the world. These globally distributed habitats need frequent and broad systematic assessments, but field surveys only cover a small fraction of these areas. Satellite-based sensors can repeatedly record the visible and near-infrared reflectance spectra that contain the absorption, scattering, and fluorescence signatures of functional phytoplankton groups, colored dissolved matter, and particulate matter near the surface ocean, and of biologically structured habitats (floating and emergent vegetation, benthic habitats like coral, seagrass, and algae)...
March 6, 2018: Ecological Applications: a Publication of the Ecological Society of America
Franziska Stoessel, Thomas Sonderegger, Peter Bayer, Stefanie Hellweg
Maintaining biotic capacity is of key importance with regard to global food and biomass provision. One reason for productivity loss is soil compaction. In this paper, we use a statistical empirical model to assess long-term yield losses through soil compaction in a regionalized manner, with global coverage and for different agricultural production systems. To facilitate the application of the model, we provide an extensive dataset including crop production data (with 81 crops and corresponding production systems), related machinery application, as well as regionalized soil texture and soil moisture data...
February 27, 2018: Science of the Total Environment
Laura G Brown, Edward Rickamer Hoover, Brenda V Faw, Nicole K Hedeen, David Nicholas, Melissa R Wong, Craig Shepherd, Daniel L Gallagher, Janell R Kause
Listeria monocytogenes (L. monocytogenes) causes the third highest number of foodborne illness deaths annually. L. monocytogenes contamination of sliced deli meats at the retail level is a significant contributing factor to L. monocytogenes illness. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Environmental Health Specialists Network (EHS-Net) conducted a study to learn more about retail delis' practices concerning L. monocytogenes growth and cross-contamination prevention. This article presents data from this study on the frequency with which retail deli refrigerator temperatures exceed 41°F, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-recommended maximum temperature for ready-to-eat food requiring time and temperature control for safety (TCS) (such as retail deli meat)...
March 2, 2018: Foodborne Pathogens and Disease
Stephen Barlas
The Food and Drug Administration has made significant progress implementing some of the 60 provisions of the 21st Century Cures Act passed in 2016. The author discusses the successes and shortcomings of the agency's regulatory activities.
March 2018: P & T: a Peer-reviewed Journal for Formulary Management
Abigail L Scott, Paul H York, Clare Duncan, Peter I Macreadie, Rod M Connolly, Megan T Ellis, Jessie C Jarvis, Kristin I Jinks, Helene Marsh, Michael A Rasheed
Seagrass meadows support key ecosystem services, via provision of food directly for herbivores, and indirectly to their predators. The importance of herbivores in seagrass meadows has been well-documented, but the links between food webs and ecosystem services in seagrass meadows have not previously been made explicit. Herbivores interact with ecosystem services - including carbon sequestration, cultural values, and coastal protection. Interactions can be positive or negative and depend on a range of factors including the herbivore identity and the grazing type and intensity...
2018: Frontiers in Plant Science
Konrad Dabrowski, Mackenzie Miller
The current body of work on rearing larval/juvenile zebrafish is based on (1) utilization of freshwater and (2) diurnal light/dark cycle, (3) provision of live feed at modest density, and (4) culture in high visibility environment. We challenged these rearing approaches by maintaining zebrafish under constant light for 46-48 days (days postfertilization [dpf]), while securing continuous feeding in high turbidity and saline (1.8-2.1 parts per thousand) environment for the experiment's duration, allowing 24 h feeding/growth of fish from first exogenous feeding to maturation...
February 27, 2018: Zebrafish
Lucie Cluver, Marija Pantelic, Mark Orkin, Elona Toska, Sally Medley, Lorraine Sherr
INTRODUCTION: The Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) present a groundbreaking global development agenda to protect the most vulnerable. Adolescents living with HIV in Sub-Saharan Africa continue to experience extreme health vulnerabilities, but we know little about the impacts of SDG-aligned provisions on their health. This study tests associations of provisions aligned with five SDGs with potential mortality risks. METHODS: Clinical and interview data were gathered from N = 1060 adolescents living with HIV in rural and urban South Africa in 2014 to 2015...
February 2018: Journal of the International AIDS Society
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