Read by QxMD icon Read

Community-based participatory research

Patricia O'Campo, Rhonda BeLue, Heidi Borenstein, Maxine Reed-Vance, Robin Gaines Lanzi, Peter Schafer, Loretta Jones, Richard Woolord
The inclusion of biomarkers in studies of stress and health outcomes is of growing interest, including for community-based participatory research (CBPR) studies. Yet the perspectives of participants and communities have been infrequently consulted to inform the biomarker collection process. The objective of this paper is to describe the process and outcomes of using CBPR in framing biomarker collection in a study of allostatic load in a maternal and child health population. Through analysis of focus group data, we identify aspects of CBPR that facilitate increased community trust and endorsement related to collecting biological samples, and also provide a community perspective that is often overlooked in the literature...
2016: Journal of Health Care for the Poor and Underserved
Elizabeth Lightfoot, Jennifer Blevins, Terry Lum, Amano Dube
This community-based participatory research study sought to identify the cultural health assets of the Somali and Oromo communities in one Minnesota neighborhood that could be mobilized to develop culturally appropriate health interventions. Community asset mappers conducted 76 interviews with Somali and Oromo refugees in in Minnesota regarding the cultural assets of their community. A community-university data analysis team coded data for major themes. Key cultural health assets of the Somali and Oromo refugee communities revealed in this study include religion and religious beliefs, religious and cultural practices, a strong culture of sharing, interconnectedness, the prominence of oral traditions, traditional healthy eating and healthy lifestyles, traditional foods and medicine, and a strong cultural value placed on health...
2016: Journal of Health Care for the Poor and Underserved
Fernando A Wagner, Payam Sheikhattari, Jane Buccheri, Mary Gunning, Lisa Bleich, Christine Schutzman
: Smoking disproportionally affects minority and underserved populations but only a handful of interventions tailored to these populations have demonstrated effectiveness in real-life situations. We use community-based participatory research (CBPR) to test two interventions delivered by a community-based health care center. METHODS: Participants randomly assigned to individual or group-based intervention for smoking cessation (N= 400). Both included cessation counseling and health education, a contingency behavioral program, Nicotine Replacement Therapy, and health care for other comorbidities...
2016: Journal of Health Care for the Poor and Underserved
Earnestine Willis, Svapna Sabnis, Chelsea Hamilton, Fue Xiong, Keli Coleman, Matt Dellinger, Michelle Watts, Richard Cox, Janice Harrell, Dorothy Smith, Melodee Nugent, Pippa Simpson
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
2016: Progress in Community Health Partnerships: Research, Education, and Action
Manuel Ángel Oscós-Sánchez, Janna Lesser, L Dolores Oscós-Flores
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
October 14, 2016: Issues in Mental Health Nursing
Melanie T Tucker, Dwight W Lewis, Pamela Payne Foster, Felecia Lucky, Lea G Yerby, Lisle Hites, John C Higginbotham
Developing meaningful community-based participatory relationships between researchers and the community can be challenging. The overall success of a community-based participatory relationship should be predicated on commitment and respect from empowered stakeholders. Prior to developing the technique discussed in this article, we hypothesized that the process of fostering relationships between researchers and the community was much like a social relationship: It has to develop organically and cannot be forced...
November 2016: Health Promotion Practice
K Closson, R McNeil, P McDougall, S Fernando, A B Collins, R Baltzer Turje, T Howard, S Parashar
BACKGROUND: Community-based HIV, harm reduction, and addiction research increasingly involve members of affected communities as Peer Research Associates (PRAs)-individuals with common experiences to the participant population (e.g. people who use drugs, people living with HIV [PLHIV]). However, there is a paucity of literature detailing the operationalization of PRA hiring and thus limited understanding regarding how affected communities can be meaningfully involved through low-barrier engagement in paid positions within community-based participatory research (CBPR) projects...
October 7, 2016: Harm Reduction Journal
Christina J Sun, Alice Ma, Amanda E Tanner, Lilli Mann, Beth A Reboussin, Manuel Garcia, Jorge Alonzo, Scott D Rhodes
Background. Little is known about the role of discrimination on depression among Latino sexual and gender identity minorities. This manuscript examined the relationship between ethnic/racial discrimination and sexual discrimination on clinically significant depressive symptoms among Latino sexual minority men (i.e., gay and bisexual men and other men who have sex with men) and Latina transgender women. Methods. A community-based participatory research partnership recruited participants (N = 186; 80.6% cisgender men) in North Carolina to a social network-based HIV intervention...
2016: Depression Research and Treatment
Payam Sheikhattari, Jummai Apata, Farin Kamangar, Christine Schutzman, Anne O'Keefe, Jane Buccheri, Fernando A Wagner
Tobacco use remains a major public health problem in the U.S. disproportionately affecting underserved communities. The Communities Engaged and Advocating for a Smoke-free Environment (CEASE) initiative is an intervention to address the problem using a community-based participatory research (CBPR) approach. This study compares quit rates in a peer-led community-based intervention with those achieved in a clinical setting. The intervention consisted of three Phases. Phase I (n = 404) was a clinic-based trial comparing two types of counseling...
September 29, 2016: Journal of Community Health
Brittney J Sullivan, Janet Prvu Bettger
BACKGROUND: Honduras is the second poorest country in Central America. The already high burden of disease is disproportionately worse among individuals with less education and limited access to health care. Community engagement is needed to bridge the gap in health care resources with the need for health promotion and education. Culturally relevant health promotion activities can foster transcultural partnerships. PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to partner nursing students with village leaders to assess a community's health needs and implement health promotion activities in Honduras...
September 26, 2016: Journal of Transcultural Nursing: Official Journal of the Transcultural Nursing Society
Dianne Goeman, J Michael, J King, Huy Luu, Claire Emmanuel, S Koch
OBJECTIVE: The aim of the Vietnamese Dementia talking-book was to address low health literacy in older people of Vietnamese background living with dementia through the provision of an online resource to help individuals, their families and carers better understand and manage this condition and provide information about available dementia services. DESIGN: This qualitative study used codesign and participatory action research to develop and refine the talking-book in consultation with expert stakeholders, a consumer advocacy group and the Vietnamese community to assess its utility and ensure cultural and linguistic appropriateness and relevance...
2016: BMJ Open
Eleshia J Morrison, Matthew M Clark, Mark L Wieland, Jennifer A Weis, Marcelo M K Hanza, Sonja J Meiers, Christi A Patten, Jeff A Sloan, Paul J Novotny, Leslie A Sim, Julie A Nigon, Irene G Sia
Immigrants experience an escalation of negative health behaviors after arrival to the United States. Negative mood is associated with poorer health behaviors in the general population; however, this relationship is understudied in immigrant populations. Adolescent (n = 81) and adult (n = 70) participants completed a health behavior survey for immigrant families using a community-based participatory research approach. Data was collected for mood, nutrition, and physical activity. Adolescents with positive mood drank less regular soda, and demonstrated more minutes, higher levels, and greater social support for physical activity (all ps < ...
September 26, 2016: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health
James D Ford, Ellie Stephenson, Ashlee Cunsolo Willox, Victoria Edge, Khosrow Farahbakhsh, Christopher Furgal, Sherilee Harper, Susan Chatwood, Ian Mauro, Tristan Pearce, Stephanie Austin, Anna Bunce, Alejandra Bussalleu, Jahir Diaz, Kaitlyn Finner, Allan Gordon, Catherine Huet, Knut Kitching, Marie-Pierre Lardeau, Graham McDowell, Ellen McDonald, Lesya Nakoneczny, Mya Sherman
Community-based adaptation (CBA) has emerged over the last decade as an approach to empowering communities to plan for and cope with the impacts of climate change. While such approaches have been widely advocated, few have critically examined the tensions and challenges that CBA brings. Responding to this gap, this article critically examines the use of CBA approaches with Inuit communities in Canada. We suggest that CBA holds significant promise to make adaptation research more democratic and responsive to local needs, providing a basis for developing locally appropriate adaptations based on local/indigenous and Western knowledge...
March 2016: Wiley Interdisciplinary Reviews. Climate Change
Dora M Raymaker, Katherine E McDonald, Elesia Ashkenazy, Martha Gerrity, Amelia M Baggs, Clarissa Kripke, Sarah Hourston, Christina Nicolaidis
Our objective was to use a community-based participatory research approach to identify and compare barriers to healthcare experienced by autistic adults and adults with and without other disabilities. To do so, we developed a Long- and Short-Form instrument to assess barriers in clinical and research settings. Using the Barriers to Healthcare Checklist-Long Form, we surveyed 437 participants (209 autistic, 55 non-autistic with disabilities, and 173 non-autistic without disabilities). Autistic participants selected different and greater barriers to healthcare, particularly in areas related to emotional regulation, patient-provider communication, sensory sensitivity, and healthcare navigation...
September 22, 2016: Autism: the International Journal of Research and Practice
Cindy Davis, Kathleen Darby, Matthew Moore, Tamara Cadet, Gwendolynn Brown
Traditional health promotion models often do not take into account the importance of shared cultural backgrounds, beliefs, and experiences unique to underserved African American women when designing community-based cancer screening and prevention programs. Thus, the purpose of this study was the development, implementation, and evaluation of a community-based participatory research (CBPR) program designed to increase breast cancer screening awareness in an underserved African American population by providing culturally appropriate social support and information...
August 11, 2016: Journal of Psychosocial Oncology
Valandra, Yvette Murphy-Erby, Brandon M Higgins, Lucy M Brown
Relatively few studies have explored domestic violence from a multiplicity of African American perspectives, experiences, and socio-demographic backgrounds within rural African American communities. Community-based participatory action research methods were used to explore domestic violence perceptions of African Americans with heterogeneous backgrounds and experiences of violence. Ten focus groups were held throughout the community with 52 diverse women (n = 33) and men (n = 19) living in the northwest region of Arkansas...
September 21, 2016: Journal of Interpersonal Violence
John Hallett, Suzanne Held, Alma Knows His Gun McCormick, Vanessa Simonds, Sloane Real Bird, Christine Martin, Colleen Simpson, Mark Schure, Nicole Turnsplenty, Coleen Trottier
Community-based participatory research and decolonizing research share some recommendations for best practices for conducting research. One commonality is partnering on all stages of research; co-developing methods of data analysis is one stage with a deficit of partnering examples. We present a novel community-based and developed method for analyzing qualitative data within an Indigenous health study and explain incompatibilities of existing methods for our purposes and community needs. We describe how we explored available literature, received counsel from community Elders and experts in the field, and collaboratively developed a data analysis method consonant with community values...
September 21, 2016: Qualitative Health Research
Charles A Walker, Harriet Cohen, David Jenkins
Despite sensationalized media attention, transgender individuals are the most marginalized and misunderstood group in the lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) community. The current article presents a case study of one woman's quest for identity. Narrative inquiry was used to analyze data from interview transcripts and four themes emerged during analysis: (a) naming the ambiguity, (b) revealing-concealing the authentic self, (c) discovering the transgender community, and (d) embracing the "T" identity...
February 1, 2016: Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services
Andrés Felipe SantoDomingo, Laura Castro-Díaz, Catalina González-Uribe
Eco-bio-social factors may increase or decrease a community's susceptibility to vector-borne disease transmission. Traditional studies have contributed information about the association between eco-bio-social factors and health outcomes, but few have provided this information in an integrative way characterizing annual dynamics among indigenous communities. Transdisciplinary research was conducted with the Bari of Karikachaboquira and the Wayúu of Marbacella and El Horno, using qualitative and participatory methods, including seasonal graphics, semi-structured interviews, geo-referencing routes, and participatory observation...
September 16, 2016: EcoHealth
Jamie Suki Chang
To understand health, research needs to move outside of controlled research settings into the environments where health activities occur-homes, streets, and neighborhoods. I offer the docent method as a qualitative place-based approach for exploring health in a participant-driven, structured, and flexible way. The docent method is a participant-led, audiotaped, and photographed walking interview through broad "sites of interest" (SOIs). It is rooted in grounded theory and influenced by community-based participatory research and walking interviews...
September 14, 2016: Qualitative Health Research
Fetch more papers »
Fetching more papers... Fetching...
Read by QxMD. Sign in or create an account to discover new knowledge that matter to you.
Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"