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Brain review

Wolfgang Enard
Humans are a remarkable species, especially because of the remarkable properties of their brain. Since the split from the chimpanzee lineage, the human brain has increased three-fold in size and has acquired abilities for vocal learning, language and intense cooperation. To better understand the molecular basis of these changes is of great biological and biomedical interest. However, all the about 16 million fixed genetic changes that occurred during human evolution are fully correlated with all molecular, cellular, anatomical and behavioral changes that occurred during this time...
October 24, 2016: Current Biology: CB
William J Joiner
Despite decades of intense study, the functions of sleep are still shrouded in mystery. The difficulty in understanding these functions can be at least partly attributed to the varied manifestations of sleep in different animals. Daily sleep duration can range from 4-20 hrs among mammals, and sleep can manifest throughout the brain, or it can alternate over time between cerebral hemispheres, depending on the species. Ecological factors are likely to have shaped these and other sleep behaviors during evolution by altering the properties of conserved arousal circuits in the brain...
October 24, 2016: Current Biology: CB
Joerg T Albert, Andrei S Kozlov
The evolution of hearing in terrestrial animals has resulted in remarkable adaptations enabling exquisitely sensitive sound detection by the ear and sophisticated sound analysis by the brain. In this review, we examine several such characteristics, using examples from insects and vertebrates. We focus on two strong and interdependent forces that have been shaping the auditory systems across taxa: the physical environment of auditory transducers on the small, subcellular scale, and the sensory-ecological environment within which hearing happens, on a larger, evolutionary scale...
October 24, 2016: Current Biology: CB
Jing Jiang, You-Jin Zhao, Xin-Yu Hu, Ming-Ying Du, Zi-Qi Chen, Min Wu, Kai-Ming Li, Hong-Yan Zhu, Poornima Kumar, Qi-Yong Gong
BACKGROUND: Multiple meta-analyses of diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) studies have reported impaired white matter integrity in patients with major depressive disorder (MDD). However, owing to inclusion of medicated patients in these studies, it is difficult to conclude whether these reported alterations are associated with MDD or confounded by medication effects. A meta-analysis of DTI studies on medication-free (medication-naive and medication washout) patients with MDD would therefore be necessary to disentangle MDD-specific effects...
October 25, 2016: Journal of Psychiatry & Neuroscience: JPN
Alexander C Schwed, Monica M Boggs, Drew Watanabe, David S Plurad, Brant A Putnam, Dennis Y Kim
Consensus is lacking for ideal management of mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) with intracranial hemorrhage (ICH). Patients are often monitored in the intensive care unit (ICU) without additional interventions. We sought to identify admission variables associated with a favorable outcome (ICU admission for 24 hours, no neurosurgical interventions, no complications or mortality) to divert these patients to a non-ICU setting in the future. We reviewed all patients with mTBI [Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) = 13-15] and concomitant ICH between July 1, 2012, and June 30, 2015...
October 2016: American Surgeon
Tijl Grootswagers, Susan G Wardle, Thomas A Carlson
Multivariate pattern analysis (MVPA) or brain decoding methods have become standard practice in analyzing fMRI data. Although decoding methods have been extensively applied in brain-computer interfaces, these methods have only recently been applied to time series neuroimaging data such as MEG and EEG to address experimental questions in cognitive neuroscience. In a tutorial style review, we describe a broad set of options to inform future time series decoding studies from a cognitive neuroscience perspective...
October 25, 2016: Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience
C Y Cheung, M L Pong, S F Au Yeung, K F Chau
INTRODUCTION: The number of actual donors per million population is the most commonly used metric to measure organ donation rates worldwide. It is deemed inadequate, however, because it does not take into account the potential donor pool. The aim of this study was to determine the true potential for solid organ donation from deceased brain-dead donors and the reasons for non-donation from potential donors in the Chinese community. METHODS: Medical records of all hospital deaths between 1 January and 31 December 2014 at a large regional hospital in Hong Kong were reviewed...
October 24, 2016: Hong Kong Medical Journal, Xianggang Yi Xue za Zhi
Ana Carolina Coelho Milani, Elis Viviane Hoffmann, Victor Fossaluza, Andrea Parolin Jackowski, Marcelo Feijo Mello
Several studies have recently demonstrated that the volumes of specific brain regions are reduced in children and adolescents with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) compared with those of healthy controls. Our study investigated the potential association between early traumatic experiences and altered brain regions and functions. We conducted a systematic review of the scientific literature regarding functional MRI and a meta-analysis of structural MRI studies that investigated cerebral region volumes in pediatric patients with PTSD...
October 25, 2016: Psychiatry and Clinical Neurosciences
Tyler C Hein, Christopher S Monk
BACKGROUND: Child maltreatment is common and has long-term consequences for affective function. Investigations of neural consequences of maltreatment have focused on the amygdala. However, developmental neuroscience indicates that other brain regions are also likely to be affected by child maltreatment, particularly in the social information processing network (SIPN). We conducted a quantitative meta-analysis to: confirm that maltreatment is related to greater bilateral amygdala activation in a large sample that was pooled across studies; investigate other SIPN structures that are likely candidates for altered function; and conduct a data-driven examination to identify additional regions that show altered activation in maltreated children, teens, and adults...
October 25, 2016: Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, and Allied Disciplines
Paula Castro, Shahid Zaman, Anthony Holland
People with Down's syndrome (DS) are at high risk for developing Alzheimer's disease (AD) at a relatively young age. This increased risk is not observed in people with intellectual disabilities for reasons other than DS and for this reason it is unlikely to be due to non-specific effects of having a neurodevelopmental disorder but, instead, a direct consequence of the genetics of DS (trisomy 21). Given the location of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) gene on chromosome 21, the amyloid cascade hypothesis is the dominant theory accounting for this risk, with other genetic and environmental factors modifying the age of onset and the course of the disease...
October 24, 2016: Journal of Neurology
Fary Khan, Bhasker Amatya, Mary P Galea, Roman Gonzenbach, Jürg Kesselring
The prevalence of disability due to neurological conditions is escalating worldwide. Neurological disorders have significant disability-burden with long-term functional and psychosocial issues, requiring specialized rehabilitation services for comprehensive management, especially treatments tapping into brain recovery 'neuroplastic' processes. Neurorehabilitation is interdisciplinary and cross-sectorial, requiring coordinated effort of diverse sectors, professions, patients and community to manage complex condition-related disability...
October 24, 2016: Journal of Neurology
Qian Jiao, Xi-Xun DU, Jun-Xia Xie, Hong Jiang
Neural stem cells (NSCs) offer great promise for the treatment of multiple neurodegenerative diseases. However, the survival and differentiation rates of grafted cells in the host brain need to be enhanced. In this regard, understanding of the underlying mechanism of NSCs survival and death is of great importance for the implications of stem cell-based therapeutic application in the treatments of neurological disorders. Autophagy is a conserved proteolytic mechanism required for maintaining cellular homeostasis, which can affect NSCs fate through regulating their biological behaviors, such as survival and proliferation...
October 25, 2016: Sheng Li Xue Bao: [Acta Physiologica Sinica]
Xi-Xun DU, Kang Qin, Qian Jiao, Jun-Xia Xie, Hong Jiang
ATP-sensitive potassium channels (KATP), as an inward rectifying potassium channel, are widely distributed in many types of tissues. KATP are activated by the depletion of ATP level and the increase in oxidative stress in cells. The activity of KATP couples cell metabolism with electrical activity and results in membrane hyperpolarization. KATP are ubiquitously distributed in the brain, including substantia nigra, hippocampus, hypothalamus, cerebral cortex, dorsal nucleus of vagus and glial cells, and participate in neuronal excitability, mitochondria homeostasis and neurotransmitter release...
October 25, 2016: Sheng Li Xue Bao: [Acta Physiologica Sinica]
Vellingiri Balachandar, Venkatesan Dhivya, Mohan Gomathi, Subramaniam Mohanadevi, Balasubramanian Venkatesh, Bharathi Geetha
Human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) are pluripotent stem cells generated from somatic cells by the introduction of a combination of pluripotency-associated genes such as OCT4, SOX2, along with either KLF4 and c-MYC or NANOG and LIN28 via retroviral or lentiviral vectors. Most importantly, hiPSCs are similar to human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) functionally as they are pluripotent and can potentially differentiate into any desired cell type when provided with the appropriate cues, but do not have the ethical issues surrounding hESCs...
2016: Stem Cell Investigation
Abdoulaye Diane, W David Pierce, Sandra E Kelly, Sharon Sokolik, Faye Borthwick, Miriam Jacome-Sosa, Rabban Mangat, Jesus Miguel Pradillo, Stuart McRae Allan, Megan R Ruth, Catherine J Field, Rebecca Hutcheson, Petra Rocic, James C Russell, Donna F Vine, Spencer D Proctor
Obesity and its metabolic complications have emerged as the epidemic of the new millennia. The use of obese rodent models continues to be a productive component of efforts to understand the concomitant metabolic complications of this disease. In 1978, the JCR:LA-cp rat model was developed with an autosomal recessive corpulent (cp) trait resulting from a premature stop codon in the extracellular domain of the leptin receptor. Rats that are heterozygous for the cp trait are lean-prone, while those that are homozygous (cp/cp) spontaneously display the pathophysiology of obesity as well as a metabolic syndrome (MetS)-like phenotype...
2016: Frontiers in Nutrition
Jacinta Nwamaka Nwogu, Qing Ma, Chinedum Peace Babalola, Waheed Adeola Adedeji, Gene D Morse, Babafemi Taiwo
Neurological complications associated with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) are a matter of great concern. While antiretroviral (ARV) drugs are the cornerstone of HIV treatment and typically produce neurological benefit, some ARV drugs have limited CNS penetration while others have been associated with neurotoxicity. CNS penetration is a function of several factors including sieving role of blood-brain and blood-CSF barriers and activity of innate drug transporters. Other factors are related to pharmacokinetics and pharmacogenetics of the specific ARV agent or mediated by drug interactions, local inflammation, and blood flow...
2016: AIDS Research and Treatment
Sara Ajina, Holly Bridge
Damage to the primary visual cortex removes the major input from the eyes to the brain, causing significant visual loss as patients are unable to perceive the side of the world contralateral to the damage. Some patients, however, retain the ability to detect visual information within this blind region; this is known as blindsight. By studying the visual pathways that underlie this residual vision in patients, we can uncover additional aspects of the human visual system that likely contribute to normal visual function but cannot be revealed under physiological conditions...
October 23, 2016: Neuroscientist: a Review Journal Bringing Neurobiology, Neurology and Psychiatry
Dennis T Lockney, Sasha Vaziri, Frank Walch, Paul Kubilis, Dan Neal, Gregory J A Murad, Maryam Rahman
BACKGROUND: Prophylactic use of anti-epileptic drugs (AEDs) for patients undergoing brain tumor surgery is common practice despite lack of clear evidence. We hypothesized that prophylactic AED (pAED) use did not affect seizure rates in brain tumor patients who underwent craniotomy for tumor resection. METHODS: A retrospective review was performed of 606 patients who underwent surgery for brain tumors from 2006-2013 at the University of Florida, excluding patients with pre-existing seizure condition prior to tumor diagnosis...
October 21, 2016: World Neurosurgery
Gabriel P Joseph, Ryan McDermott, Maria A Baryshnikova, Charles S Cobbs, Ilya V Ulasov
Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most aggressive neoplastic brain tumor in humans with a median survival of less than 2 years. It is therefore critical to understand the mechanism of glioma progression and to identify future targets for intervention. We investigate the mechanisms of cytomegalovirus as an oncomodulatory agent implicated in glioma progression, as well as immunosuppression. This review provides a comprehensive evaluation of recent investigative developments concerning the role of CMV in cellular processes during glioma growth...
October 21, 2016: Cancer Letters
Elijah Mak, Silvy Gabel, Habib Mirette, Li Su, Guy B Williams, Adam Waldman, Katie Wells, Karen Ritchie, Craig Ritchie, John O'Brien
The last decade has witnessed a proliferation of neuroimaging studies characterising brain changes associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD), where both widespread atrophy and 'signature' brain regions have been implicated. In parallel, a prolonged latency period has been established in AD, with abnormal cerebral changes beginning many years before symptom onset. This raises the possibility of early therapeutic intervention, even before symptoms, when treatments could have the greatest effect on disease-course modification...
October 21, 2016: Ageing Research Reviews
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