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Helena Rosenblatt
Rosenblatt questions whether Pocock's Barbarism and Religion, though enormously learned and rich, in fact accomplishes Pocock's stated aims. In other words, does the context presented help to explain the intended meaning and significance of Gibbon's Decline and Fall? She asks whether Pocock's methodology, indebted to the Cambridge School, is consistent and serviceable and challenges his claim that Gibbon should be seen as a member of the "Protestant Enlightenment."
2016: Journal of the History of Ideas
Michael Y Ni, Tom K Li, Herbert Pang, Brandford H Y Chan, Betty Y Yuan, Ichiro Kawachi, C Mary Schooling, Gabriel M Leung
Despite the extensive history of social movements around the world, the evolution of population mental health before, during, and after a social movement remains sparsely documented. We sought to assess over time the prevalence of depressive symptoms during and after the Occupy Central movement in Hong Kong and to examine the associations of direct and indirect exposures to Occupy Central with depressive symptoms. We longitudinally administered interviews to 909 adults who were randomly sampled from the population-representative FAMILY Cohort at 6 time points from March 2009 to March 2015: twice each before, during, and after the Occupy Central protests...
October 19, 2016: American Journal of Epidemiology
Alexis Pauline Gumbs
In 1974, warrior poet mother Audre Lorde published the poem "Blackstudies," a freeform dream villanelle about her complicated experience as a Black lesbian feminist English professor at the City University of New York during the dynamic period when students rose up in protest. The university granted open admissions, and cultural nationalists who taught at City University worked to create a Black Studies program. In the poem, she describes her vantage point at this particular historical and pedagogical moment from the seventeenth floor within a dreamscape where she navigates the stereotypes, silences, and urgencies that shaped her experience as an educator...
October 10, 2016: Journal of Lesbian Studies
Hyun Woo Kim, John D McCarthy
Extensive research has shown individual religiosity to have an impact upon U.S. protest participation. But very little work has examined the role of religious density in a community on the likelihood of protest mobilization. Our research links the religious density across 62 counties in New York State to various protest mobilization issues during the period of 1960-1995. In this research, we develop a theory of socially organized sentiments to examine religious influences on overall protest event mobilizations in local communities, a specific example of a more general theory that can link community structure to multiple forms of civic engagement...
November 2016: Social Science Research
John Weeks
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
October 2016: Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine: Research on Paradigm, Practice, and Policy
Pat Sidley
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
October 4, 2016: BMJ: British Medical Journal
Arin H Ayanian, Nicole Tausch
Social psychological research has overlooked collective action in repressive contexts, where activists face substantial personal risks. This paper examines the social psychological processes motivating activists to engage in collective action in risky contexts. We investigate the idea that perceived risks due to government sanctions can galvanize action through fuelling anger, shaping efficacy beliefs, and increasing identification with the movement. We also argue that anger, efficacy, and identification motivate action intentions directly and indirectly through reducing the personal importance activists attach to these risks...
October 3, 2016: British Journal of Social Psychology
Jeongeun Jo
After the defeat of the Opium War and the Sino-Japanese War, China's intellectuals realized necessity of modernization (Westernization) to survive in the imperial order of the survival of the fittest. In particular, it was urgent to accept Western medicine and train the doctors who learned Western medicine to change the sick and weary Chinese to be robust. Thus, new occupations of the Western Medicine Group (xiyi, doctors who learned Western medicine) emerged in China. As with the first profession, the new Western Medicine Group tried to define standards of Western medicine and medical profession; however, it was difficult in the absence of the strong central government...
August 2016: ┼Či Sahak
M Mir, A Rostami, M Hormozi
BACKGROUND AND AIM: Interleukin (IL)-18 is a proinflammatory cytokine secreted from mononuclear cells. Serum concentration of IL-18 is a strong predictor of death in patients with cardiovascular diseases. Recent studies have shown that microinflammation is involved in the pathogenesis of diabetic nephropathy as well as of cardiovascular diseases. This study aimed to test the hypothesis that the serum level of IL-18 is a common predictor of nephropathy and atherosclerosis in patients with type 2 diabetes...
August 31, 2016: Diabetes & Metabolic Syndrome
Richard Ledet
Literature on religion and political intolerance indicates competing expectations about how Black Protestant church affiliation affects African Americans' attitudes about civil liberties. On the one hand, Black Protestant theology emphasizes personal freedom and social justice, factors generally linked to more tolerant attitudes. On the other hand, Black Protestants tend to be conservative on family and social issues, factors often linked to intolerance of gays and lesbians. Data from the General Social Survey are used to examine the influence of religious group identification, as well as other relevant aspects of religiosity, on political intolerance among African Americans...
September 15, 2016: Journal of Homosexuality
Declan Butler
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
September 14, 2016: Nature
(no author information available yet)
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
September 14, 2016: Nature
Antero Olakivi
Public care work organisations in Northern Europe often seek to increase their economic efficiency in ways that care workers criticise for reducing both their professional autonomy and the quality of care. Recently, the ideal of 'enterprising nursing' has emerged as a political belief according to which economic efficiency, care workers' autonomy and the quality of care can be improved in tandem by cultivating care workers' agential abilities. This article examines the reception of this belief among migrant care workers in Finland...
September 9, 2016: Sociology of Health & Illness
Kamaldeep Bhui, Maria Joao Silva, Raluca A Topciu, Edgar Jones
BACKGROUND: Radicalisation is proposed to explain why some individuals begin to support and take part in violent extremism. However, there is little empirical population research to inform prevention, and insufficient attention to the role of psychiatric vulnerabilities. AIMS: To test the impact of depressive symptoms, adverse life events and political engagement on sympathies for violent protest and terrorism (SVPT). METHOD: A cross-sectional survey of a representative sample of Pakistani and Bangladeshi men and women from two English cities...
September 8, 2016: British Journal of Psychiatry: the Journal of Mental Science
Alexander J Colbow, Erin Cannella, Walter Vispoel, Carrie A Morris, Charles Cederberg, Mandy Conrad, Alexander J Rice, William M Liu
Despite increasing interest in social class issues within psychology, there are a limited number of theoretically rooted instruments to measure subjective social class, particularly related to classism. The purpose of this project was to create a brief, psychometrically sound, and theoretically grounded instrument, called the Classism Attitudinal Profile (CAP), designed to measure 2 aspects of classism (downward and upward) defined in Liu's (2011) Social Class World View Model Revised (SCWM-R). Data from 2 independent samples (n = 608, n = 199) provided evidence in support of the consistency (alpha and test-retest coefficients), anticipated factor structure, and convergent/discriminant validity of CAP subscale scores...
October 2016: Journal of Counseling Psychology
Rebecca M Aldrich, Norman A White, Brittany L Conners
There is a growing body of scholarly literature about occupational justice, human rights, and power redistribution ready to be integrated into occupational science and occupational therapy education. As students around the world become familiar with the concepts and intents underlying occupational justice, it will be important to investigate their translation of occupational justice understandings into actions outside the classroom. This exploratory single case study describes curricular, university, and regional factors related to one former student's engagement in social protests following her occupational justice education...
September 3, 2016: OTJR: Occupation, Participation and Health
Tim Stockwell, Tanya Chikritzhs, Timothy Naimi, Jinhui Zhao
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
September 2016: Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs
Margaret McCartney
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
2016: BMJ: British Medical Journal
O Sarobidy Rakotonarivo, Marije Schaafsma, Neal Hockley
While discrete choice experiments (DCEs) are increasingly used in the field of environmental valuation, they remain controversial because of their hypothetical nature and the contested reliability and validity of their results. We systematically reviewed evidence on the validity and reliability of environmental DCEs from the past thirteen years (Jan 2003-February 2016). 107 articles met our inclusion criteria. These studies provide limited and mixed evidence of the reliability and validity of DCE. Valuation results were susceptible to small changes in survey design in 45% of outcomes reporting reliability measures...
December 1, 2016: Journal of Environmental Management
Michael D Barnett, Kylie B Sligar, Chiachih D C Wang
Rape myths are false beliefs about rape, rape victims, and rapists, often prejudicial and stereotypical. Guided by feminist theory and available empirical research, this study aimed to examine the influences of gender, religious affiliation, and religiosity on rape myth acceptance of U.S. emerging adults. A sample of 653 university students aged 18 to 30 years were recruited from a large public university in the southern United States to complete the research questionnaires. Results indicated that individuals who identified as Roman Catholic or Protestant endorsed higher levels of rape myth acceptance than their atheist or agnostic counterparts...
August 24, 2016: Journal of Interpersonal Violence
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