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Moral reasoning

Ewa Szymańska, Paulina Chałupnik, Katarzyna Szczepańska, Ana Maria Cuñado Moral, Darryl S Pickering, Birgitte Nielsen, Tommy N Johansen, Katarzyna Kieć-Kononowicz
A new series of carboxyaryl-substituted phenylalanines was designed, synthesized and pharmacologically characterized in vitro at native rat ionotropic glutamate receptors as well as at cloned homomeric kainate receptors GluK1-GluK3. Among them, six compounds bound to GluK1 receptor subtypes with reasonable affinity (Ki values in the range of 4.9-7.5μM). A structure-activity relationship (SAR) for the obtained series, focused mainly on the pharmacological effect of structural modifications in the 4- and 5-position of the phenylalanine ring, was established...
September 30, 2016: Bioorganic & Medicinal Chemistry Letters
Ruiping Fan
This essay offers a Confucian evaluation of Article 14 of the UNESCO Declaration on Bioethics and Human Rights, with a focus given to its statement that "the enjoyment of the highest attainable standard of health is one of the fundamental rights of every human being." It indicates that "a right to health" contained in the statement is open to two different interpretations, one radically egalitarian, another a decent minimum. It shows that Confucianism has strong moral considerations to reject the radical egalitarian interpretation, and argues that a Confucian nonegalitarian health distribution ethics of differentiated and graded love and obligation can reasonably be supported with a right to the decent minimum of health at the international level...
2016: Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal
Hille Haker
This essay explores the two main objectives of Bishop's book, which he analyzes in the context of the care for the dying: (1) the medical metaphysics underlying medical science and (2) biopolitics as governance of the human body. This essay discusses Bishop's claims in view of newer developments in medicine, especially the turn to the construction of life, and confronts the concept of the patient's sovereignty with an alternative model of vulnerable agency. In order to overcome the impasses of contemporary bioethics, the essay argues that practical reason requires a two-fold ethics: first, it must develop a new hermeneutics of illness and disease, and second, in order to protect the individuals in the process of dying, moral claims concerning death must be based on the concept of human rights...
October 6, 2016: Journal of Medicine and Philosophy
Iwao Kuwajima
Since a concept of Evidence-based Medicine appeared in medical field in 1991, modern medical treatment have been remarkably changed.However, delusive belief of EBM without criticism has brought negative aspect, such as utilization of EBM by companies as a tool of promotion of drug or medical device.Although most of clinical trials were financially supported by drug companies. result of clinical trial does not always ended in favor of test drug or device. When negative results appeared, various way were taken by industry such as usage of SPIN, emphasizing secondary endpoint...
September 2016: Journal of Hypertension
Shaina Riciputi, Meghan H McDonough, Sarah Ullrich-French
Physical activity-based positive youth development (PYD) programs often aim to foster character development. This study examined youth perspectives of character development curricula and the impact these activities have on their lives within and beyond the program. This case study examined youth from low-income families in a physical activity-based summer PYD program that integrated one character concept (respect, caring, responsibility, trust) in each of 4 weeks. Participants (N = 24) included a cross-section of age, gender, ethnicity, and past program experience...
October 13, 2016: Journal of Sport & Exercise Psychology
Qin Zhu, Brent K Jesiek
This paper begins by reviewing dominant themes in current teaching of professional ethics in engineering education. In contrast to more traditional approaches that simulate ethical practice by using ethical theories to reason through micro-level ethical dilemmas, this paper proposes a pragmatic approach to ethics that places more emphasis on the practical plausibility of ethical decision-making. In addition to the quality of ethical justification, the value of a moral action also depends on its effectiveness in solving an ethical dilemma, cultivating healthy working relationships, negotiating existing organizational cultures, and achieving contextual plausibility in everyday professional practice...
October 10, 2016: Science and Engineering Ethics
Michael Lauerer, Katharina Kaiser, Eckhard Nagel
BACKGROUND: Transplantation medicine is associated with several ethical issues related to the lack of organs. Major questions concern the regulations for giving permission for organ removal, informing the public about organ donation, setting of organ allocation priorities, waiting list access, and strategies to counteract scarcity. METHODS: This contribution is based on analyses of legal regulations, guidelines of self-regulatory bodies, administrative data, and literature from medical, normative, and empiric disciplines...
August 2016: Visc Med
Belén Encina, Leonel Lagunes, Marc Morales-Codina
Sepsis and septic shock remain a major cause of mortality among critically ill patient. This is particularly relevant among cancer patients as highlighted by different series showing that up to one in five patients admitted to intensive care units (ICU) with sepsis have cancer, and also, sepsis is a leading reason for ICU admission in patients with cancer. The classic predictors of mortality among these patients (such as cancer lineage, neutropenia degree, or bone marrow transplantation history) have changed during the last decades, and they should no longer be used to rule out ICU admission...
September 2016: Annals of Translational Medicine
Keith J Holyoak, Derek Powell
We review a broad range of work, primarily in cognitive and social psychology, that provides insight into the processes of moral judgment. In particular, we consider research on pragmatic reasoning about regulations and on coherence in decision making, both areas in which psychological theories have been guided by work in legal philosophy. Armed with these essential prerequisites, we sketch a psychological framework for how ordinary people make judgments about moral issues. Based on a literature review, we show how the framework of deontological coherence unifies findings in moral psychology that have often been explained in terms of a grab-bag of heuristics and biases...
October 6, 2016: Psychological Bulletin
Mohammed Rafique Moosa, Jonathan David Maree, Maxwell T Chirehwa, Solomon R Benatar
Universal access to renal replacement therapy is beyond the economic capability of most low and middle-income countries due to large patient numbers and the high recurrent cost of treating end stage kidney disease. In countries where limited access is available, no systems exist that allow for optimal use of the scarce dialysis facilities. We previously reported that using national guidelines to select patients for renal replacement therapy resulted in biased allocation. We reengineered selection guidelines using the 'Accountability for Reasonableness' (procedural fairness) framework in collaboration with relevant stakeholders, applying these in a novel way to categorize and prioritize patients in a unique hierarchical fashion...
2016: PloS One
Euzebiusz Jamrozik, Toby Handfield, Michael J Selgelid
Mass vaccination has been a successful public health strategy for many contagious diseases. The immunity of the vaccinated also protects others who cannot be safely or effectively vaccinated-including infants and the immunosuppressed. When vaccination rates fall, diseases like measles can rapidly resurge in a population. Those who cannot be vaccinated for medical reasons are at the highest risk of severe disease and death. They thus may bear the burden of others' freedom to opt out of vaccination. It is often asked whether it is legitimate for states to adopt and enforce mandatory universal vaccination...
October 3, 2016: Journal of Medical Ethics
David S Oderberg
I explore the increasingly important issue of cooperation in immoral actions, particularly in connection with healthcare. Conscientious objection, especially as pertains to religious freedom in healthcare, has become a pressing issue in the light of the US Supreme Court judgement in Hobby Lobby Section 'Moral evaluation using the basic principles of cooperation' outlines a theory of cooperation inspired by Catholic moral theologians such as those cited by the court. The theory has independent plausibility and is at least worthy of serious consideration-in part because it is an instance of double-effect reasoning, which is also independently plausible despite its association with moral theology...
October 3, 2016: Journal of Medical Ethics
Irene Bruna Seu
This study investigates everyday moral reasoning in relation to donations and prosocial behaviour in a humanitarian context. The discursive analysis focuses on the principles of deservingness which members of the public use to decide who to help and under what conditions. The study discusses three repertoires of deservingness - 'seeing a difference', 'waiting in queues', and 'something for nothing' - to illustrate participants' dilemmatic reasoning and to examine how the position of 'being deserving' is negotiated in humanitarian crises...
October 3, 2016: British Journal of Social Psychology
Camellia Torabizadeh, Leyla Homayuni, Marzieh Moattari
BACKGROUND: Nurses are often faced with complex situations that made them to make ethical decisions; and to make such decisions, they need to possess the power of moral reasoning. Studies in Iran show that the majority of nursing students lack proper ethical development. Socratic teaching is a student-centered method which is strongly opposed to the lecturing method. OBJECTIVES: This study was conducted to evaluate the impacts of Socratic questioning on the moral reasoning of the nursing students...
September 30, 2016: Nursing Ethics
Timothy F Murphy
Antinatalist commentators recommend that humanity bring itself to a close, on the theory that pain and suffering override the value of any possible life. Other commentators do not require the voluntary extinction of human beings, but they defend that outcome if people were to choose against having children. Against such views, Richard Kraut has defended a general moral obligation to people the future with human beings until the workings of the universe render such efforts impossible. Kraut advances this view on the grounds that we are obliged to exercise beneficence toward others and on the grounds that the goods available in human lives are morally compelling...
November 2016: Bioethics
Åsa Rejnö, Gunilla Silfverberg, Britt-Marie Ternestedt
BACKGROUND: Ethical problems are a universal phenomenon but rarely researched concerning patients dying from acute stroke. These patients often have a reduced consciousness from stroke onset and thereby lack ability to convey their needs and could be described as 'incompetent' decision makers regarding their own care. OBJECTIVE: The aim of the study was to deepen the understanding of stroke team members' reasoning about truth-telling in end-of-life care due to acute stroke...
September 22, 2016: Nursing Ethics
Ann B Hamric, Lucia D Wocial
Since 1992, institutions accredited by The Joint Commission have been required to have a process in place that allows staff members, patients, and families to address ethical issues or issues prone to conflict. While the commission's expectations clearly have made ethics committees more common, simply having a committee in no way demonstrates its effectiveness in terms of the availability of the service to key constituents, the quality of the processes used, or the outcomes achieved. Beyond meeting baseline accreditation standards, effective ethics resources are requisite for quality care for another reason...
September 2016: Hastings Center Report
Gavin Nobes, Georgia Panagiotaki, Kimberley J Bartholomew
The influence of intention and outcome information on moral judgments was investigated by telling children aged 4-8yearsandadults (N=169) stories involving accidental harms (positive intention, negative outcome) or attempted harms (negative intention, positive outcome) from two studies (Helwig, Zelazo, & Wilson, 2001; Zelazo, Helwig, & Lau, 1996). When the original acceptability (wrongness) question was asked, the original findings were closely replicated: children's and adults' acceptability judgments were based almost exclusively on outcome, and children's punishment judgments were also primarily outcome-based...
September 17, 2016: Cognition
Iwao Kuwajima
Since a concept of Evidence-based Medicine appeared in medical field in 1991, modern medical treatment have been remarkably changed.However, delusive belief of EBM without criticism has brought negative aspect, such as utilization of EBM by companies as a tool of promotion of drug or medical device.Although most of clinical trials were financially supported by drug companies. result of clinical trial does not always ended in favor of test drug or device. When negative results appeared, various way were taken by industry such as usage of SPIN, emphasizing secondary endpoint...
September 2016: Journal of Hypertension
Marco T Tejeda, José Arredondo, Pablo Liedo, Diana Pérez-Staples, Patricia Ramos-Morales, Francisco Díaz-Fleischer
Species that exhibit broad ranges of distribution may successfully navigate environmental changes by modifying some of their life-history traits. Environmental humidity imposes a critical stress that organisms may overcome by increasing their resistance to desiccation. We used experimental evolution to investigate adaptation to desiccation in the tephritid Anastrepha ludens, a species with high fecundity, late maturation, and long lifespan. We measured morphological, physiological, developmental as well as demographic changes involved in the adaptation to desiccation...
September 18, 2016: Evolution; International Journal of Organic Evolution
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