Read by QxMD icon Read

Amphetamine pregnancy

Chittaranjan Andrade
The use of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) medications during pregnancy has increased in recent years. An earlier article in this column examined whether psychostimulant medications, used to treated ADHD and related disorders, increase the risk of major congenital malformations in pregnancies with first trimester exposure to these drugs. This article examines whether amphetamines, methylphenidate, and atomoxetine exposure during early and late pregnancy are associated with other adverse gestational outcomes...
January 2018: Journal of Clinical Psychiatry
Pitchaya Homsup, Chadakarn Phaloprakarn, Siriwan Tangjitgamol, Sumonmal Manusirivithaya
OBJECTIVE: To identify characteristics and pregnancy outcomes among pregnant illicit drug users living in an urban area, and to describe trends in drug use over an 8-year period. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Data on pregnant women living in the Bangkok Metropolitan Region who delivered at our institution during 2008-2015 were studied. Women with drug use (n = 197) and women without drug use (n = 787) were compared in terms of maternal characteristics and pregnancy outcomes...
February 2018: Taiwanese Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology
Asher Ornoy
INTRODUCTION: Attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a neurobehavioral problem found in 2-5% of adults. Stimulants and drugs that affect the dopaminergic, noradrenergic and/or serotonergic systems are effective treatment and are increasingly prescribed to women at child bearing age. It is consequently important that reliable information on the safety of these drugs in pregnancy is available so that appropriate therapeutic choices can be made. RESULTS: The data on stimulants (methylphenidate and amphetamines) are generally showing that there is no increase in the rate of major congenital anomalies...
February 6, 2018: Pharmaceutical Research
Chittaranjan Andrade
The use of prescription psychostimulants during pregnancy has been increasing in recent years. One large and 3 small studies have recently examined the risk of major congenital malformations following the use of methylphenidate and amphetamines during the first trimester of pregnancy. The broad findings of these studies are that first trimester gestational exposure to methylphenidate or amphetamines is associated with an increased risk of major congenital malformations but the associations are no longer statistically significant after adjusting analyses for confounding variables; that first trimester exposure to amphetamines is not associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular malformations; and that first trimester exposure to methylphenidate may increase the risk of cardiovascular malformations...
January 23, 2018: Journal of Clinical Psychiatry
Kayla N Anderson, Elizabeth C Ailes, Melissa Danielson, Jennifer N Lind, Sherry L Farr, Cheryl S Broussard, Sarah C Tinker
Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a neurodevelopmental disorder that affects individuals across the lifespan. ADHD medication use among pregnant women is increasing (1), but consensus about the safety of ADHD medication use during pregnancy is lacking. Given that nearly half of U.S. pregnancies are unintended (2), and early pregnancy is a critical period for fetal development, examining trends in ADHD medication prescriptions among reproductive-aged women is important to quantify the population at risk for potential exposure...
January 19, 2018: MMWR. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report
William O Cooper
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
February 1, 2018: JAMA Psychiatry
Krista F Huybrechts, Gabriella Bröms, Lotte Brix Christensen, Kristjana Einarsdóttir, Anders Engeland, Kari Furu, Mika Gissler, Sonia Hernandez-Diaz, Pär Karlsson, Øystein Karlstad, Helle Kieler, Anna-Maria Lahesmaa-Korpinen, Helen Mogun, Mette Nørgaard, Johan Reutfors, Henrik Toft Sørensen, Helga Zoega, Brian T Bateman
Importance: Given the rapidly increasing use of stimulant medications during pregnancy and among women of reproductive age who may become pregnant inadvertently, there is a need to better understand their safety. Objective: To examine the risk of congenital malformations associated with intrauterine exposure to stimulants. Design, Setting, and Participants: Cohort study of the Medicaid-insured population in the United States nested in the 2000-2013 US Medicaid Analytic eXtract, with follow-up of safety signals detected in the Medicaid Analytic eXtract data using the Nordic Health registries (2003-2013) (Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway, and Sweden)...
December 13, 2017: JAMA Psychiatry
Md Dilshad Manzar, Mohammed Salahuddin, Peter Sony, Tarekegn Tesfaye Maru, Seithikurippu R Pandi-Perumal, Adam Moscovitch, Ahmed S Bahammam
Khat (Catha edulis) is a evergreen flowering shrub that is cultivated at high altitudes, especially in East Africa and the southwest of the Arabian Peninsula. The plant contains alkaloids, of which cathinone and cathine have structural similarity and pharmacological action similar to amphetamines. The leaves are, therefore, consumed in some regions as a psychoactive stimulant due to cultural beliefs and misperceptions on the health benefits of khat consumption. This resulted in a growing prevalence of khat consumption among pregnant women...
October 2017: Annals of Thoracic Medicine
Jacqueline M Cohen, Sonia Hernández-Díaz, Brian T Bateman, Yoonyoung Park, Rishi J Desai, Kathryn J Gray, Elisabetta Patorno, Helen Mogun, Krista F Huybrechts
OBJECTIVE: To evaluate whether psychostimulants used to treat attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) are associated with risk of adverse placental-associated pregnancy outcomes including preeclampsia, placental abruption, growth restriction, and preterm birth. METHODS: We designed a population-based cohort study in which we examined a cohort of pregnant women and their liveborn neonates enrolled in Medicaid from 2000 to 2010. Women who received amphetamine-dextroamphetamine or methylphenidate monotherapy in the first half of pregnancy were compared with unexposed women...
December 2017: Obstetrics and Gynecology
Lauren G Strange, Kerri Kochelek, Robert Keasling, Stacy D Brown, Brooks B Pond
In recent years, the abuse of synthetic cathinones or 'bath salts' has become a major public health concern. Although these compounds were initially sold legally and labeled "not for human consumption", the 'bath salts' are psychostimulants, with similar structures and pharmacologic mechanisms to cocaine, the amphetamines, and 3,4 methylendioxymethamphetamine (MDMA, Molly, or Ecstasy). The reported use of these substances by women of child-bearing age highlights the necessity of studies seeking to delineate risks of prenatal exposure...
August 12, 2017: Neurotoxicology and Teratology
Hamisu M Salihu, Jason L Salemi, Anjali Aggarwal, Beverly F Steele, Ross C Pepper, Mulubrhan F Mogos, Muktar H Aliyu
BACKGROUND: Cardiovascular disease remains a leading cause of pregnancy-associated deaths in the United States. The extent to which increasing opioid use among pregnant women contributes to fatal cardiovascular events is unknown. We examined trends in opioid use among pregnant women over the previous decade and the association between changes in temporal trends in opioid drug use and the incidence of acute cardiac events among mothers. METHODS: In this retrospective analysis of the Healthcare and Cost Utilization Project, we used a 2-stage stratified cluster sampling of all inpatient hospital discharges from nonfederal hospitals from January 1, 2002 through December 31, 2014...
January 2018: American Journal of Medicine
Jenna L N Sprowles, Jillian R Hufgard, Arnold Gutierrez, Rebecca A Bailey, Sarah A Jablonski, Michael T Williams, Charles V Vorhees
Most antidepressants inhibit monoamine reuptake. Selective serotonin (5-HT) reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) act on the 5-HT transporter (SERT) whereas norepinephrine-dopamine reuptake inhibitors (NDRIs) act on the norepinephrine and dopamine transporters. Epidemiological reports link SSRI use during pregnancy to an increased prevalence of autism spectrum disorder (ASD). We previously showed that perinatal exposure to the SSRI citalopram (CIT) results in rodent offspring that exhibit a number of behaviors consistent with an ASD-like phenotype...
October 2017: International Journal of Developmental Neuroscience
George Pitsilis, Dimitrios Spyridakos, George G Nomikos, George Panagis
Marijuana is currently the most commonly abused illicit drug. According to recent studies, cannabinoid use occurring prior to pregnancy can impact brain plasticity and behavior in future generations. The purpose of the present study was to determine whether adolescent exposure of female rats to Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ(9)-THC) induces transgenerational effects on the reward-facilitating effects of Δ(9)-THC and d-amphetamine in their adult male offspring. Female Sprague-Dawley rats received Δ(9)-THC (0...
2017: Frontiers in Pharmacology
Phunnapa Kittirattanapaiboon, Soontaree Srikosai, Apisak Wittayanookulluk
PURPOSE OF REVIEW: The study reviews recent publications on methamphetamine use and dependence women in term of their epidemic, physical health impact, psychosocial impacts, and also in the identified vulnerable issues. RECENT FINDINGS: Studies of vulnerable populations of women are wide ranging and include sex workers, sexual minorities, homeless, psychiatric patients, suburban women, and pregnant women, in which amphetamine type stimulants (ATSs) are the most commonly reported illicit drug used among them...
July 2017: Current Opinion in Psychiatry
D Jeffrey Newport, Amy L Hostetter, Sarah H Juul, Sunny M Porterfield, Bettina T Knight, Zachary N Stowe
OBJECTIVE: To investigate the association, if any, of prenatal mental illness and psychotropic exposure with the risk of hypertensive disorders of pregnancy (HDP). METHODS: A case-cohort analysis was conducted of 686 pregnant women participating in prospective, longitudinal observational studies in a tertiary referral center between January 1998 and May 2012. Risk estimates were produced using multivariate logistic regression modeling. Medication- and diagnosis-specific data were utilized to conduct post hoc confirmatory analyses of the risk estimates...
November 2016: Journal of Clinical Psychiatry
Rebecca Delafield, Tricia E Wright
Substance use can have serious consequences for the health and well-being of individuals. The problem is of particular concern when it involves pregnant women due to health risks for the mother and the fetus. In utero exposure to either legal (eg, alcohol, cigarettes, and certain prescription drugs) or illicit (eg, amphetamines, cocaine, and opioids) substances can result in potentially serious and long-lasting health problems for infants. Available data from Hawai'i indicate that substance use among pregnant women is higher than national targets, which reflect the fact that there is essentially no acceptable rate of use of these substances...
November 2016: Hawai'i Journal of Medicine & Public Health: a Journal of Asia Pacific Medicine & Public Health
Kamal Ali, Thomas Rosser, Ravindra Bhat, Kim Wolff, Simon Hannam, Gerrard F Rafferty, Anne Greenough
OBJECTIVES: To determine at the peak age for sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) the ventilatory response to hypoxia of infants whose mothers substance misused in pregnancy (SM infants), or smoked during pregnancy (S mothers) and controls whose mothers neither substance misused or smoked. In addition, we compared the ventilatory response to hypoxia during the neonatal period and peak age of SIDS. WORKING HYPOTHESIS: Infants of S or SM mothers compared to control infants would have a poorer ventilatory response to hypoxia at the peak age of SIDS...
May 2017: Pediatric Pulmonology
Marta Concheiro, Elena Lendoiro, Ana de Castro, Eva Gónzalez-Colmenero, Ana Concheiro-Guisan, Patricia Peñas-Silva, Manuel Macias-Cortiña, Angelines Cruz-Landeira, Manuel López-Rivadulla
Drug exposure during pregnancy constitutes a major legal issue and a public health concern. Drug and metabolite determination in biological matrices from mother and newborn is an objective indication of prenatal drug exposure. However, limited data are available regarding the interpretation of these analytical results in terms of window of detection and degree of exposure. We collected paired maternal hair, meconium, placenta, and umbilical cord from 727 mother-newborn dyads. We analyzed these specimens by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry for the determination of cocaine, opioids, methadone, and amphetamines, and compared the analytical results from the four different matrices...
September 5, 2016: Drug Testing and Analysis
Jenna L N Sprowles, Jillian R Hufgard, Arnold Gutierrez, Rebecca A Bailey, Sarah A Jablonski, Michael T Williams, Charles V Vorhees
Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) block the serotonin (5-HT) reuptake transporter (SERT) and increase synaptic 5-HT. 5-HT is also important in brain development; hence when SSRIs are taken during pregnancy there exists the potential for these drugs to affect CNS ontogeny. Prenatal SSRI exposure has been associated with an increased prevalence of autism spectrum disorder (ASD), and peripheral 5-HT is elevated in some ASD patients. Perinatal SSRI exposure in rodents has been associated with increased depression and anxiety-like behavior, decreased sociability, and impaired learning in the offspring, behaviors often seen in ASD...
November 2016: International Journal of Developmental Neuroscience
Emily Putnam-Hornstein, John J Prindle, John M Leventhal
BACKGROUND: Substance exposure is thought to contribute to reports of suspected maltreatment made to child protective services (CPS) at or shortly after birth. There are limited data, however, on whether clinicians are more likely to report black and Hispanic substance-exposed infants compared with white infants. METHODS: We examined racial differences in diagnosed substance exposure and subsequent maltreatment reports by using linked birth, hospital discharge, and CPS records...
September 2016: Pediatrics
Fetch more papers »
Fetching more papers... Fetching...
Read by QxMD. Sign in or create an account to discover new knowledge that matter to you.
Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"