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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28617773/pregnancy-outcomes-after-maternal-zika-virus-infection-during-pregnancy-u-s-territories-january-1-2016-april-25-2017
#1
Carrie K Shapiro-Mendoza, Marion E Rice, Romeo R Galang, Anna C Fulton, Kelley VanMaldeghem, Miguel Valencia Prado, Esther Ellis, Magele Scott Anesi, Regina M Simeone, Emily E Petersen, Sascha R Ellington, Abbey M Jones, Tonya Williams, Sarah Reagan-Steiner, Janice Perez-Padilla, Carmen C Deseda, Andrew Beron, Aifili John Tufa, Asher Rosinger, Nicole M Roth, Caitlin Green, Stacey Martin, Camille Delgado Lopez, Leah deWilde, Mary Goodwin, H Pamela Pagano, Cara T Mai, Carolyn Gould, Sherif Zaki, Leishla Nieves Ferrer, Michelle S Davis, Eva Lathrop, Kara Polen, Janet D Cragan, Megan Reynolds, Kimberly B Newsome, Mariam Marcano Huertas, Julu Bhatangar, Alma Martinez Quiñones, John F Nahabedian, Laura Adams, Tyler M Sharp, W Thane Hancock, Sonja A Rasmussen, Cynthia A Moore, Denise J Jamieson, Jorge L Munoz-Jordan, Helentina Garstang, Afeke Kambui, Carolee Masao, Margaret A Honein, Dana Meaney-Delman
Pregnant women living in or traveling to areas with local mosquito-borne Zika virus transmission are at risk for Zika virus infection, which can lead to severe fetal and infant brain abnormalities and microcephaly (1). In February 2016, CDC recommended 1) routine testing for Zika virus infection of asymptomatic pregnant women living in areas with ongoing local Zika virus transmission at the first prenatal care visit, 2) retesting during the second trimester for women who initially test negative, and 3) testing of pregnant women with signs or symptoms consistent with Zika virus disease (e...
June 16, 2017: MMWR. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28398681/population-based-pregnancy-and-birth-defects-surveillance-in-the-era-of-zika-virus
#2
Suzanne M Gilboa, Cara T Mai, Carrie K Shapiro-Mendoza, Janet D Cragan, Cynthia A Moore, Dana M Meaney-Delman, Denise J Jamieson, Margaret A Honein, Coleen A Boyle
BACKGROUND: Zika virus is a newly recognized human teratogen; monitoring its impact on the birth prevalence of microcephaly and other adverse pregnancy outcomes will continue to be an urgent need in the United States and worldwide. METHODS: When the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) activated the Emergency Operations Center for the Zika virus outbreak response in January of 2016, public health leadership recognized that a joint, coordinated effort was required between activities focused on the effects of the infection among pregnant women and those focused on birth defects in fetuses and infants...
March 15, 2017: Birth defects research
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28398677/preparing-for-biological-threats-addressing-the-needs-of-pregnant-women
#3
REVIEW
Amelia K Watson, Sascha Ellington, Christina Nelson, Tracee Treadwell, Denise J Jamieson, Dana M Meaney-Delman
Intentional release of infectious agents and biological weapons to cause illness and death has the potential to greatly impact pregnant women and their fetuses. We review what is known about the maternal and fetal effects of seven biological threats: Bacillus anthracis (anthrax); variola virus (smallpox); Clostridium botulinum toxin (botulism); Burkholderia mallei (glanders) and Burkholderia pseudomallei (melioidosis); Yersinia pestis (plague); Francisella tularensis (tularemia); and Rickettsia prowazekii (typhus)...
March 15, 2017: Birth defects research
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28384133/vital-signs-update-on-zika-virus-associated-birth-defects-and-evaluation-of-all-u-s-infants-with-congenital-zika-virus-exposure-u-s-zika-pregnancy-registry-2016
#4
Megan R Reynolds, Abbey M Jones, Emily E Petersen, Ellen H Lee, Marion E Rice, Andrea Bingham, Sascha R Ellington, Nicole Evert, Sarah Reagan-Steiner, Titilope Oduyebo, Catherine M Brown, Stacey Martin, Nina Ahmad, Julu Bhatnagar, Jennifer Macdonald, Carolyn Gould, Anne D Fine, Kara D Polen, Heather Lake-Burger, Christina L Hillard, Noemi Hall, Mahsa M Yazdy, Karnesha Slaughter, Jamie N Sommer, Alys Adamski, Meghan Raycraft, Shannon Fleck-Derderian, Jyoti Gupta, Kimberly Newsome, Madelyn Baez-Santiago, Sally Slavinski, Jennifer L White, Cynthia A Moore, Carrie K Shapiro-Mendoza, Lyle Petersen, Coleen Boyle, Denise J Jamieson, Dana Meaney-Delman, Margaret A Honein
BACKGROUND: In collaboration with state, tribal, local, and territorial health departments, CDC established the U.S. Zika Pregnancy Registry (USZPR) in early 2016 to monitor pregnant women with laboratory evidence of possible recent Zika virus infection and their infants. METHODS: This report includes an analysis of completed pregnancies (which include live births and pregnancy losses, regardless of gestational age) in the 50 U.S. states and the District of Columbia (DC) with laboratory evidence of possible recent Zika virus infection reported to the USZPR from January 15 to December 27, 2016...
April 7, 2017: MMWR. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28359922/first-application-of-7t-magnetic-resonance-imaging-in-endoscopic-endonasal-surgery-of-skull-base-tumors
#5
Thomas F Barrett, Hadrien A Dyvorne, Francesco Padormo, Puneet S Pawha, Bradley N Delman, Raj K Shrivastava, Priti Balchandani
BACKGROUND: Successful endoscopic endonasal surgery for the resection of skull base tumors is reliant on preoperative imaging to delineate pathology from the surrounding anatomy. The increased signal-to-noise ratio afforded by 7T MRI can be used to increase spatial and contrast resolution, which may lend itself to improved imaging of skull base. In this study, we apply a 7T imaging protocol to patients with skull base tumors and compare the images to clinical standard of care. METHODS: Images were acquired at 7T on 11 patients with skull base lesions...
March 27, 2017: World Neurosurgery
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28333910/establishing-a-timeline-to-discontinue-routine-testing-of-asymptomatic-pregnant-women-for-zika-virus-infection-american-samoa-2016-2017
#6
W Thane Hancock, Heidi M Soeters, Susan L Hills, Ruth Link-Gelles, Mary E Evans, W Randolph Daley, Emily Piercefield, Magele Scott Anesi, Mary Aseta Mataia, Anaise M Uso, Benjamin Sili, Aifili John Tufa, Jacqueline Solaita, Elizabeth Irvin-Barnwell, Dana Meaney-Delman, Jason Wilken, Paul Weidle, Karrie-Ann E Toews, William Walker, Phillip M Talboy, William K Gallo, Nevin Krishna, Rebecca L Laws, Megan R Reynolds, Alaya Koneru, Carolyn V Gould
The first patients with laboratory-confirmed cases of Zika virus disease in American Samoa had symptom onset in January 2016 (1). In response, the American Samoa Department of Health (ASDoH) implemented mosquito control measures (1), strategies to protect pregnant women (1), syndromic surveillance based on electronic health record (EHR) reports (1), Zika virus testing of persons with one or more signs or symptoms of Zika virus disease (fever, rash, arthralgia, or conjunctivitis) (1-3), and routine testing of all asymptomatic pregnant women in accordance with CDC guidance (2,3)(...
March 24, 2017: MMWR. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28253231/baseline-prevalence-of-birth-defects-associated-with-congenital-zika-virus-infection-massachusetts-north-carolina-and-atlanta-georgia-2013-2014
#7
Janet D Cragan, Cara T Mai, Emily E Petersen, Rebecca F Liberman, Nina E Forestieri, Alissa C Stevens, Augustina Delaney, April L Dawson, Sascha R Ellington, Carrie K Shapiro-Mendoza, Julie E Dunn, Cathleen A Higgins, Robert E Meyer, Tonya Williams, Kara N D Polen, Kim Newsome, Megan Reynolds, Jennifer Isenburg, Suzanne M Gilboa, Dana M Meaney-Delman, Cynthia A Moore, Coleen A Boyle, Margaret A Honein
Zika virus infection during pregnancy can cause serious brain abnormalities, but the full range of adverse outcomes is unknown (1). To better understand the impact of birth defects resulting from Zika virus infection, the CDC surveillance case definition established in 2016 for birth defects potentially related to Zika virus infection* (2) was retrospectively applied to population-based birth defects surveillance data collected during 2013-2014 in three areas before the introduction of Zika virus (the pre-Zika years) into the World Health Organization's Region of the Americas (Americas) (3)...
March 3, 2017: MMWR. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28056005/zika-virus-10-public-health-achievements-in-2016-and-future-priorities
#8
Nadia L Oussayef, Satish K Pillai, Margaret A Honein, C Ben Beard, Beth Bell, Coleen A Boyle, Lars M Eisen, Katrin Kohl, Matthew J Kuehnert, Eva Lathrop, Stacey W Martin, Rebecca Martin, Janet C McAllister, Elizabeth Pantino McClune, Paul Mead, Dana Meaney-Delman, Brett Petersen, Lyle R Petersen, Kara N D Polen, Ann M Powers, Stephen C Redd, James J Sejvar, Tyler Sharp, Julie Villanueva, Denise J Jamieson
The introduction of Zika virus into the Region of the Americas (Americas) and the subsequent increase in cases of congenital microcephaly resulted in activation of CDC's Emergency Operations Center on January 22, 2016, to ensure a coordinated response and timely dissemination of information, and led the World Health Organization to declare a Public Health Emergency of International Concern on February 1, 2016. During the past year, public health agencies and researchers worldwide have collaborated to protect pregnant women, inform clinicians and the public, and advance knowledge about Zika virus (Figure 1)...
January 6, 2017: MMWR. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27960197/birth-defects-among-fetuses-and-infants-of-us-women-with-evidence-of-possible-zika-virus-infection-during-pregnancy
#9
Margaret A Honein, April L Dawson, Emily E Petersen, Abbey M Jones, Ellen H Lee, Mahsa M Yazdy, Nina Ahmad, Jennifer Macdonald, Nicole Evert, Andrea Bingham, Sascha R Ellington, Carrie K Shapiro-Mendoza, Titilope Oduyebo, Anne D Fine, Catherine M Brown, Jamie N Sommer, Jyoti Gupta, Philip Cavicchia, Sally Slavinski, Jennifer L White, S Michele Owen, Lyle R Petersen, Coleen Boyle, Dana Meaney-Delman, Denise J Jamieson
Importance: Understanding the risk of birth defects associated with Zika virus infection during pregnancy may help guide communication, prevention, and planning efforts. In the absence of Zika virus, microcephaly occurs in approximately 7 per 10 000 live births. Objective: To estimate the preliminary proportion of fetuses or infants with birth defects after maternal Zika virus infection by trimester of infection and maternal symptoms. Design, Setting, and Participants: Completed pregnancies with maternal, fetal, or infant laboratory evidence of possible recent Zika virus infection and outcomes reported in the continental United States and Hawaii from January 15 to September 22, 2016, in the US Zika Pregnancy Registry, a collaboration between the CDC and state and local health departments...
January 3, 2017: JAMA: the Journal of the American Medical Association
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27711033/update-interim-guidance-for-preconception-counseling-and-prevention-of-sexual-transmission-of-zika-virus-for-persons-with-possible-zika-virus-exposure-united-states-september-2016
#10
Emily E Petersen, Dana Meaney-Delman, Robyn Neblett-Fanfair, Fiona Havers, Titilope Oduyebo, Susan L Hills, Ingrid B Rabe, Amy Lambert, Julia Abercrombie, Stacey W Martin, Carolyn V Gould, Nadia Oussayef, Kara N D Polen, Matthew J Kuehnert, Satish K Pillai, Lyle R Petersen, Margaret A Honein, Denise J Jamieson, John T Brooks
CDC has updated its interim guidance for persons with possible Zika virus exposure who are planning to conceive (1) and interim guidance to prevent transmission of Zika virus through sexual contact (2), now combined into a single document. Guidance for care for pregnant women with possible Zika virus exposure was previously published (3). Possible Zika virus exposure is defined as travel to or residence in an area of active Zika virus transmission (http://www.cdc.gov/zika/geo/index.html), or sex* without a condom(†) with a partner who traveled to or lived in an area of active transmission...
October 7, 2016: MMWR. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27676441/cerebral-18-%C3%A2-f-t807-av1451-retention-pattern-in-clinically-probable-cte-resembles-pathognomonic-distribution-of-cte-tauopathy
#11
D L Dickstein, M Y Pullman, C Fernandez, J A Short, L Kostakoglu, K Knesaurek, L Soleimani, B D Jordan, W A Gordon, K Dams-O'Connor, B N Delman, E Wong, C Y Tang, S T DeKosky, J R Stone, R C Cantu, M Sano, P R Hof, S Gandy
Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) is a neurodegenerative disorder most commonly associated with repetitive traumatic brain injury (TBI) and characterized by the presence of neurofibrillary tangles of tau protein, known as a tauopathy. Currently, the diagnosis of CTE can only be definitively established postmortem. However, a new positron emission tomography (PET) ligand, [(18)F]T807/AV1451, may provide the antemortem detection of tau aggregates, and thus various tauopathies, including CTE. Our goal was to examine [(18)F]T807/AV1451 retention in athletes with neuropsychiatric symptoms associated with a history of multiple concussions...
September 27, 2016: Translational Psychiatry
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27675665/the-influence-of-postoperative-lymph-node-radiation-therapy-on-overall-survival-of-patients-with-stage-iii-melanoma-a-national-cancer-data-base-analysis
#12
H Danish, K Patel, J Switchenko, T W Gillespie, J Jhaveri, M Chowdhary, M Abugideiri, K A Delman, D H Lawson, M K Khan
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
October 1, 2016: International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology, Physics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27575390/the-influence-of-postoperative-lymph-node-radiation-therapy-on-overall-survival-of-patients-with-stage-iii-melanoma-a-national-cancer-database-analysis
#13
Hasan H Danish, Kirtesh R Patel, Jeffrey M Switchenko, Theresa W Gillespie, Jaymin Jhaveri, Mudit Chowdhary, Mustafa Abugideiri, Keith A Delman, David H Lawson, Mohammad K Khan
Recently, TROG 02.01 results showed that in stage III melanoma patients with nodal metastasis, adjuvant radiation to lymph node basin after nodal dissection improves lymph node field relapse without an overall survival (OS) benefit. However, this trial was neither designed nor powered to detect an OS difference. In the present study, we analyzed patients in the National Cancer Database (NCDB) with stage III melanoma with pathologically involved nodes and compared survival outcomes of adjuvant radiation and no-radiation cohorts...
December 2016: Melanoma Research
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27488813/cadaver-based-simulation-increases-resident-confidence-initial-exposure-to-fundamental-techniques-and-may-augment-operative-autonomy
#14
REVIEW
Steven C Kim, Jeremy G Fisher, Keith A Delman, Johanna M Hinman, Jahnavi K Srinivasan
OBJECTIVE: Surgical simulation is an important adjunct in surgical education. The majority of operative procedures can be simplified to core components. This study aimed to quantify a cadaver-based simulation course utility in improving exposure to fundamental maneuvers, resident and attending confidence in trainee capability, and if this led to earlier operative independence. DESIGN: A list of fundamental surgical procedures was established by a faculty panel. Residents were assigned to a group led by a chief resident...
November 2016: Journal of Surgical Education
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27479770/prolonged-detection-of-zika-virus-rna-in-pregnant-women
#15
Dana Meaney-Delman, Titilope Oduyebo, Kara N D Polen, Jennifer L White, Andrea M Bingham, Sally A Slavinski, Lea Heberlein-Larson, Kirsten St George, Jennifer L Rakeman, Susan Hills, Christine K Olson, Alys Adamski, Lauren Culver Barlow, Ellen H Lee, Anna M Likos, Jorge L Muñoz, Emily E Petersen, Elizabeth M Dufort, Amy B Dean, Margaret M Cortese, Gilberto A Santiago, Julu Bhatnagar, Ann M Powers, Sherif Zaki, Lyle R Petersen, Denise J Jamieson, Margaret A Honein
OBJECTIVE: Zika virus infection during pregnancy is a cause of microcephaly and other fetal brain abnormalities. Reports indicate that the duration of detectable viral RNA in serum after symptom onset is brief. In a recent case report involving a severely affected fetus, Zika virus RNA was detected in maternal serum 10 weeks after symptom onset, longer than the duration of RNA detection in serum previously reported. This report summarizes the clinical and laboratory characteristics of pregnant women with prolonged detection of Zika virus RNA in serum that were reported to the U...
October 2016: Obstetrics and Gynecology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27467820/update-interim-guidance-for-health-care-providers-caring-for-pregnant-women-with-possible-zika-virus-exposure-united-states-july-2016
#16
Titilope Oduyebo, Irogue Igbinosa, Emily E Petersen, Kara N D Polen, Satish K Pillai, Elizabeth C Ailes, Julie M Villanueva, Kim Newsome, Marc Fischer, Priya M Gupta, Ann M Powers, Margaret Lampe, Susan Hills, Kathryn E Arnold, Laura E Rose, Carrie K Shapiro-Mendoza, Charles B Beard, Jorge L Muñoz, Carol Y Rao, Dana Meaney-Delman, Denise J Jamieson, Margaret A Honein
CDC has updated its interim guidance for U.S. health care providers caring for pregnant women with possible Zika virus exposure, to include the emerging data indicating that Zika virus RNA can be detected for prolonged periods in some pregnant women. To increase the proportion of pregnant women with Zika virus infection who receive a definitive diagnosis, CDC recommends expanding real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (rRT-PCR) testing. Possible exposures to Zika virus include travel to or residence in an area with active Zika virus transmission, or sex* with a partner who has traveled to or resides in an area with active Zika virus transmission without using condoms or other barrier methods to prevent infection...
July 25, 2016: MMWR. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27248295/possible-zika-virus-infection-among-pregnant-women-united-states-and-territories-may-2016
#17
Regina M Simeone, Carrie K Shapiro-Mendoza, Dana Meaney-Delman, Emily E Petersen, Romeo R Galang, Titilope Oduyebo, Brenda Rivera-Garcia, Miguel Valencia-Prado, Kimberly B Newsome, Janice Pérez-Padilla, Tonya R Williams, Matthew Biggerstaff, Denise J Jamieson, Margaret A Honein
Zika virus is a cause of microcephaly and brain abnormalities (1), and it is the first known mosquito-borne infection to cause congenital anomalies in humans. The establishment of a comprehensive surveillance system to monitor pregnant women with Zika virus infection will provide data to further elucidate the full range of potential outcomes for fetuses and infants of mothers with asymptomatic and symptomatic Zika virus infection during pregnancy. In February 2016, Zika virus disease and congenital Zika virus infections became nationally notifiable conditions in the United States (2)...
May 27, 2016: MMWR. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27031943/update-interim-guidance-for-health-care-providers-caring-for-women-of-reproductive-age-with-possible-zika-virus-exposure-united-states-2016
#18
Emily E Petersen, Kara N D Polen, Dana Meaney-Delman, Sascha R Ellington, Titilope Oduyebo, Amanda Cohn, Alexandra M Oster, Kate Russell, Jennifer F Kawwass, Mateusz P Karwowski, Ann M Powers, Jeanne Bertolli, John T Brooks, Dmitry Kissin, Julie Villanueva, Jorge Muñoz-Jordan, Matthew Kuehnert, Christine K Olson, Margaret A Honein, Maria Rivera, Denise J Jamieson, Sonja A Rasmussen
CDC has updated its interim guidance for U.S. health care providers caring for women of reproductive age with possible Zika virus exposure to include recommendations on counseling women and men with possible Zika virus exposure who are interested in conceiving. This guidance is based on limited available data on persistence of Zika virus RNA in blood and semen. Women who have Zika virus disease should wait at least 8 weeks after symptom onset to attempt conception, and men with Zika virus disease should wait at least 6 months after symptom onset to attempt conception...
2016: MMWR. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27025833/identifying-meningitis-during-an-anthrax-mass-casualty-incident-systematic-review-of-systemic-anthrax-since-1880
#19
Stefan Katharios-Lanwermeyer, Jon-Erik Holty, Marissa Person, James Sejvar, Dana Haberling, Heather Tubbs, Dana Meaney-Delman, Satish K Pillai, Nathaniel Hupert, William A Bower, Katherine Hendricks
BACKGROUND: Bacillus anthracis, the causative agent of anthrax, is a potential bioterrorism agent. Anthrax meningitis is a common manifestation of B. anthracis infection, has high mortality, and requires more aggressive treatment than anthrax without meningitis. Its rapid identification and treatment are essential for successful management of an anthrax mass casualty incident. METHODS: Three hundred six published reports from 1880 through 2013 met predefined inclusion criteria...
June 15, 2016: Clinical Infectious Diseases: An Official Publication of the Infectious Diseases Society of America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27010422/preventing-transmission-of-zika-virus-in-labor-and-delivery-settings-through-implementation-of-standard-precautions-united-states-2016
#20
Christine K Olson, Martha Iwamoto, Kiran M Perkins, Kara N D Polen, Jeffrey Hageman, Dana Meaney-Delman, Irogue I Igbinosa, Sumaiya Khan, Margaret A Honein, Michael Bell, Sonja A Rasmussen, Denise J Jamieson
Zika virus transmission was detected in the Region of the Americas (Americas) in Brazil in May 2015, and as of March 21, 2016, local mosquito-borne transmission of Zika virus had been reported in 32 countries and territories in the Americas, including Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands.* Most persons infected with Zika virus have a mild illness or are asymptomatic. However, increasing evidence supports a link between Zika virus infection during pregnancy and adverse pregnancy and birth outcomes (1), and a possible association between recent Zika virus infection and Guillain-Barré syndrome has been reported (2)...
2016: MMWR. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report
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